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  • 1.
    Backåberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gummesson, Christina
    Lund University.
    Impact of musculoskeletal symptoms on general physical activity during nursing education.2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 385-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education should prepare students for a lifelong professional career including managing clinical physical demands. Musculoskeletal symptoms, such as bodily pain, have been reported among nurses and nursing students but less is known about the impact of symptoms in daily activities. The aim was to explore the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms and their impact on general physical activity among nursing students. This cross-sectional study was based on a questionnaire to all undergraduate nursing students at one university. The prevalence of symptoms and physical impact during past 3 and 12 months was calculated for each study year. Odds ratio was analysed with logistic regression. Of 348 students 224 responded, 84% women, mean age 24.6 years (range 20-46). Of those 143 (64%) reporting symptoms during the past 12 months, 91 (64%) reported impact on physical activities. Most commonly reported were everyday activities such as transportations and prolonged sitting. The odds ratio for reporting symptoms was 1.8 for year 2 (95% CI: 0.9-3.5), and 4.7 for year 3 (95% CI: 2.1-10.7). The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was high among nursing students and higher the final study year and not only resulted in discomfort but had an impact on the students' general physical activities.

  • 2.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Nursing students understanding of critical thinking and appraisal and academic writing: a descriptive qualitative study2012In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 356-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, regulations from the National Agency for Higher Education advocate an education that equips students with independence as well as critical, problem-based thinking, i.e. academic literacy skills. However, some research findings indicate that students may leave higher education without mastering these skills effectively. As part of quality-assuring a nursing programme at a university college in south-east Sweden we explored the nursing student's view of crucial academic literacy skills, such as critical thinking and appraisal and academic writing, by conducting a descriptive, qualitative study. Informants were recruited through an advertisement posted on the university's e-learning tool. Eight focused interviews were conducted during autumn 2010. The transcribed interviews were analysed – inspired by content analysis – and two categories became apparent: constantly questioning and formality before substance. The latter revealed a gap between the student's perception of academic writing and that of the educators, thus implying that nursing students might not be equipped with the tools they need to develop within academia. We suggest that students could benefit in their academic endeavours from theoretical educational models that integrate several academic skills simultaneously and which could be incorporated into the development of syllabuses and curriculums.

  • 3.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The experiences of patients receiving care from nursing students at a Dedicated Education Unit: A phenomenological study2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 353-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how patients perceive being cared for by student nurses, in a clinical context in the form of a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). The study has been performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach grounded in phenomenology. Lifeworld interviews were conducted with patients who had received care from student nurses on an orthopaedic dedicated education unit (DEU) and data have been analysed for meanings. The findings reveal how patients experience to be carried along as a part of the students' learning process. This is described in more detail via the constituents: a mutual invitation to participe, the importance of genuine encounters, and essential support. Patients experience both a stable and a less stable care in a learning environment and it is thus essential for them to be invited to be a part of both the students’ learning process and their own health process. The findings also highlight the key role of the supervisors for patients’ sense of security. Finally there are indications that concepts such as DEU with a lifeworld-led didactic, based on reflection on both the patients’ stories and the students’ experiences, can create learning environments that support patients’ health processes and also students’ learning processes.

  • 4.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The experiences of supporting learning in pairs of nursing students in clinical practice2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, no September, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how supervisors experience supporting nursing students' learning in pairs on a Developing and Learning Care Unit in Sweden. The present study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenology. A total of 25 lifeworld interviews were conducted with supervisors who had supervised pairs of students. The findings reveal how supervisors support students' learning in pairs through a reflective approach creating learning space in the encounter with patients, students and supervisors. Supervisors experience a movement that resembles balancing between providing support in learning together and individual learning. The findings also highlight the challenge in supporting both the pairs of students and being present in the reality of caring. In conclusion, the learning space has the potential of creating a relative level of independency in the interaction between pairs of students and their supervisor when the supervisor strives towards a reflective approach.

  • 5.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    Ryhov County Council, Sweden;Linköping University, Sweden.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Safipour, Jalal
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    “Cultural awareness requires more than theoretical education”: nursing students’ experiences2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 39, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural awareness in healthcare providers is considered one of the most important factors in improving the efficiency and quality of care in a diverse population. Thus, education in cultural awareness needs to be an essential component in nursing education. This study, which uses a qualitative design, aimed to investigate cultural awareness in nursing students in Sweden. Focus groups were used to collect data from 12 students. Three categories were identified as follows after qualitative data analysis of the interviews: 1) desire to learn, 2) learning by doing and 3) caring beyond boundaries. The result clearly indicates that students are willing to learn more about how to care for people with different cultural backgrounds. However, this learning is not always available in official lecture-based education. In fact, most awareness about cultural aspects of healthcare is developed from practice and informal education.

    Finally, the result also revealed the importance of nurses being able to see the individual beyond the culture, and being aware of their own prejudice. In conclusion, education offers limited opportunities for nursing students to become culturally aware. Nursing education can be improved by strengthening both theoretical and practical tasks involving cultural awareness.

  • 6. Ivarsson, Bodil
    et al.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The subject of pedagogy from theory to practice - The view of newly registered nurses2009In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 510-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe, from the newly registered nurses’ perspective, specific events when using their pedagogical knowledge in their everyday clinical practice. The design was qualitative and the critical incident technique was used. Data was collected via interviews with ten newly registered nurses who graduated from the same University program 10 months earlier and are now employed at a university hospital.

    Two categories emerged in the analyses. The first category was “Pedagogical methods in theory” with the sub-categories Theory and the application of the course in practice, Knowledge of pedagogy and Information as a professional competence. The second category was “Pedagogical methods in everyday clinical practice” with sub-categories Factual knowledge versus pedagogical knowledge, Information and relatives, Difficulties when giving information, Understanding information received, Pedagogical tools, Collaboration in teams in pedagogical situations, and Time and giving information. By identifying specific events regarding pedagogical methods the findings can be useful for everyone from teachers and health-care managers to nurse students and newly registered nurses, to improve teaching methods in nurse education.

  • 7.
    Johannesson, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Olsson, Mats
    Linköping University.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Learning Features in Computer Simulation Skills Training2010In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 268-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New simulation tools imply new opportunities to teach skills and train health care professionals. The aim of this study was to investigate the learning gained from computer simulation skills training. The study was designed for optimal educational settings, which benefit student-centred learning. Twenty-four second year undergraduate nursing students practised intravenous catheterization with the computer simulation program CathSim. Questionnaires were answered before and after the skills training, and after the skills examination. When using CathSim, the students appreciated the variation in patient cases, the immediate feedback, and a better understanding of anatomy, but they missed having an arm model to hold. We concluded that CathSim was useful in the students’ learning process and skills training when appropriately integrated into the curriculum. Learning features to be aware of when organizing curricula with simulators are motivation, realism, variation, meaningfulness and feedback.

  • 8. Jöud, Anna
    et al.
    Sandholm, Anders
    Alseby, Lola
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Feasibility of a computerized male urethral catheterization simulator.2010In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 70-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catheterization of the male urethra might cause harm and discomfort for the patient. Computer-based simulator training might improve the skills of students as well as professional nurses. This study aims to study the feasibility of a new portable computer-based male urethral catheterization simulator, Urecath (Melerit Urecath Vision). The simulator consists of three software modules: teaching (explains the different procedures in the catheterization), learning (game settings with practice and self-assessments tests), and simulator module that is connected to a box with a model of a penis where syringes and the urinary catheter can be inserted. Registered nurses (n=23), nurse assistants (n=14), nurse students (n=12), and a nurse assistant student (n=1) participated in a simulation session and answered 30 questions about the feasibility of the simulator. The participants appreciated the different modules, particularly the teaching and learning modules. The simulator module was appreciated for its cross-sectional views and feedback but was found to lack a tactile component; there was too little and no varying resistance when inserting the catheter. The participants perceived the present prototype of Urecath as a valuable education tool. The male urethral catheterization simulator prototype Urecath has advantages in its present shape but to be an alternative to existing training options for practicing male urethral catheterization, it should be complemented with a tactile mode and degrees of difficulty.

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