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  • 1.
    Ekeberhg, Margaretha
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Lepp, M
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Reflective learning with Drama in Nursing Education - a Swedish attempt to overcome the theory praxis gap.2004In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, no 24, p. 622-628Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Hvalic-Touzery, Simona
    et al.
    Univ Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Skela-Savic, Brigita
    Angela Boskin Fac Hlth Care, Slovenia.
    Macrae, Rhoda
    Univ West Scotland, UK.
    Jack-Waugh, Anna
    Univ West Scotland, UK.
    Tolson, Debbie
    Univ West Scotland, UK.
    Hellström, Amanda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    de Abreu, Wilson
    Porto Sch Nursing, Portugal.
    Pesjak, Katja
    Angela Boskin Fac Hlth Care, Slovenia.
    The provision of accredited higher education on dementia in six European countries: An exploratory study2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 60, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The World Health Organization has identified developing the knowledge and skills of healthcare professionals who are involved in dementia care as a priority. Most healthcare professionals lack the necessary knowledge, skills and understanding to provide high quality dementia care. While dementia education amongst most UK university health and social care programmes is inconsistent, we know little about the provision of dementia education in European universities. Objectives: To examine the provision of accredited higher education on dementia in European countries, to illustrate that it is highly variable despite universities being the major provider of education for healthcare professionals internationally. Design: An exploratory research design was used. Settings: The providers of higher education undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the Czech Republic, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden. Participants: Higher Education Institutions who provide undergraduate and postgraduate education in the fields of nursing, medicine, psychology, social work, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and gerontology in six European countries. Methods: The data was collected using a structured questionnaire. Researchers in each country conducted an internet-based search using the websites of Higher Education Institutions to identify existing accredited dementia education. Results: These searches revealed a lack of dementia education in undergraduate health and social care study programmes. Three of the six countries offered postgraduate study programmes on dementia. There was a significant variation amongst the countries in relation to the provision of dementia education at undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral levels. Conclusions: Dementia is a global challenge and educating and upskilling the workforce is a policy imperative. To deliver the best dementia care, investment in interprofessional evidence-based education is required if we are to respond effectively and compassionately to the needs of people living with dementia and their families. Higher Education Institutions have an important role to play in equipping health and social care professionals with the knowledge, skills and understanding to respond to this imperative.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nursing students' experience of using a personal digital assistant (PDA) in clinical practice: an intervention study2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1246-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A personal digital assistant (PDA) is a multifunctional information and communication tool allowing nursing students to keep up to date with expanding health related knowledge.

    Objectives

    This study was aimed at exploring nursing students' experience of using a PDA in clinical practice.

    Method

    In this intervention study, nursing students (n=67) used PDAs during a period of 15weeks, replied to questionnaires, and participated in focus group interviews.

    Results

    The PDA was found to support nursing students in clinical practice and to have the potential to be a useful tool with benefits for both the patients and for the students. The PDA was regarded as useful, and was presumed to imply increased confidence and time savings, and contribute to improved patient safety and quality of care.

    Conclusions

    With available mobile technology, nursing students would be able to access necessary information, independent of time and place. Therefore, it is important that stakeholders and educators facilitate the use of PDAs to support nursing students during their clinical practice, in order to prepare them for their future work, and to continuously improve the safety and quality of healthcare.

  • 4.
    Lendahls, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Midwifery students´ experiences of simulation- and skills training2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 50, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In Sweden, simulation- and skills training are implemented in midwifery education in order to prepare students for clinical practice. Research regarding the use of both low to high levels of fidelity in simulation in midwifery programme is limited.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training.

    Methods

    Midwifery students (n = 61), at advanced level, were interviewed in 13 group interviews from 2011 to 2105. A semi-structured interview guide was used, and data were analysed by content analysis.

    Results

    The results are presented in four main categories: develops hands on skills and communication, power of collaborative learning, highly valued learning environment and facilitates clinical practice. The majority of students felt that the simulation- and skills training were necessary to become familiar with hands on skills. Having repetitive practices in a safe and secure environment was viewed as important, and students highly valued that mistakes could be made without fear of comprising patient safety. Student's collaboration, reflections and critical thinking increased learning ability. Simulation- and skills training created links between theory and practice, and the lecturer had an important role in providing instructions and feedback. Students felt prepared and confident before their clinical practice, and simulation- and skills training increased safety for all involved, resulting in students being more confident, as patients in clinical practice became less exposed. Furthermore, mentors were satisfied with students' basic skills.

    Conclusion

    Simulation- and skills training support the development of midwifery skills. It creates links between theory and practice, which facilitates students' learning ability. Training needs to include reflections and critical thinking in order to develop their learning. The lecturer has an important role in encouraging time for reflections and creating safe environment during the skills and simulation training.

  • 5.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Pernilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Reflective seminaries grounded in caring science and lifeworld theory: A phenomenological study from the perspective of nursing students2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 61, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Creative strategies are needed in nurse education to integrate theory, practice and lived experiences. Towards that end, reflective seminars, conducted in congruence with reflective lifeworld theory and caring science, were implemented during a three-year nursing programme. The reflection seminars took place during the theoretical parts of education and the clinical placements. Each reflection group consisted of six to nine students, and the seminars were led by a lecturer from the university.

    Objectives

    This article aims to describe the experiences of learning about caring science by participating in reflective seminars that were integrated into courses during a three-year nursing education programme.

    Design

    A phenomenological approach was used, and qualitative group interviews were conducted.

    Setting

    The study was conducted at a university in southern Sweden.

    Participants

    Twenty three students, 19 women and four men, volunteered to participate. All participants were at the end of a three-year nurse education programme. Data were collected through four group interviews with five to seven participants in each group.

    Methods

    This study used a reflective lifeworld research approach based on phenomenological philosophy.

    Results

    The findings reveal that nursing students experience reflective seminars as being valuable for their professional development. The result is described in more detail via four meaning units: An obtained awareness of the value of reflection in clinical practice; Reflection contributes to an approach of thoughtfulness; Caring science has become second nature, and Reflection as a strength and a challenge at the threshold of a profession.

    Conclusions

    This study contributes to the understanding of reflective seminars grounded in lifeworld theory as a didactic strategy that enables students to increase their knowledge of caring science and develop their reflective skills.

  • 6. Markström, Urban
    et al.
    Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda
    Bejerholm, Ulrika
    Björkman, Tommy
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hansson, Lars
    Leufstadius, Christel
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Svensson, Bengt
    Östman, Margareta
    Eklund, Mona
    Attitudes towards mental illness among health care students at Swedish universities:: A follow-up study after completed clinical placement2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 29, p. 660-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine the changes in attitudes towards mental illness after theoretical

    education and clinical placement among students from university programmes preparing for different

    kinds of health professions. Three different questionnaires were used, measuring the level of familiarity

    with mental illness and attitudes towards mental illness in general and towards specific mental illnesses.

    The data were collected on two occasions, before the theoretical course and after the completed clinical

    placement. The result showed that the attitudes toward mental illness in general had changed in a less

    stigmatising direction after the clinical placement. On the other hand, attitudes toward specific mental

    illnesses did not show any major changes. A conclusion is that the clinical placement included in the university

    programmes to some extent could affect attitudes in a de-stigmatizing direction, possibly because

    of the interaction with persons suffering from mental illness and experienced supervisors.

  • 7.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Sherwood, Gwen
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.
    Sandberg, Therese
    Värnamo Hospital, Sweden.
    Rehn, Jeanette
    Värnamo Hospital, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    The visibility of QSEN competencies in clinical assessment tools in Swedish nurse education2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 59, p. 110-117, article id S0260-6917(17)30207-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Prospective nurses need specific and sufficient knowledge to be able to provide quality care. The Swedish Society of Nursing has emphasized the importance of the six quality and safety competencies (QSEN), originated in the US, in Swedish nursing education.

    PURPOSE: To investigate the visibility of the QSEN competencies in the assessment tools used in clinical practice

    METHOD: A quantitative descriptive method was used to analyze assessment tools from 23 universities.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Teamwork and collaboration was the most visible competency. Patient-centered care was visible to a large degree but was not referred to by name. Informatics was the least visible, a notable concern since all nurses should be competent in informatics to provide quality and safety in care. These results provide guidance as academic and clinical programs around the world implement assessment of how well nurses have developed these essential quality and safety competencies.

  • 8.
    Tuvesson, Hanna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology ; Malmö University.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology ; Malmö University.
    The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 1343-1345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice.

1 - 8 of 8
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  • fi-FI
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