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  • 1.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitetet i Oslo, Inst för Informatik, Universitet i Umeå.
    Design of digital democracies: Performance of citizenship, gender and IT2007In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 10, p. 404-423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Haller, André
    et al.
    University of Bamberg, Germany.
    Holt, Kristoffer
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Media and Journalism.
    Paradoxical populism: how PEGIDA relates to mainstream and alternative media2018In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 1665-1680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distrust of mainstream media expressed in the slogan ‘the liar press’ (‘Lügenpresse’) is often used as an example of a populist, anti-establishment attitude that is currently winning terrain throughout the Western world. In combination with the rise of alternative media (especially online), it poses a serious challenge for ‘old media’. But how do those who are most suspicious and critical relate to the mainstream media in their own media channels? In this article, we have compared the official Facebook pages of the PEGIDA movement in Germany and Austria, in order to describe their use of references to traditional/mainstream and alternative media. The results indicate that references to mainstream and alternative media are distributed almost equally. Furthermore, when there are references to mainstream media, they are generally of an affirmative nature. These findings are relevant for the debate about cyberbalcanization, echo chambers, filter bubbles and the impact of alternative media on public discourse.

  • 3.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, University of Umeå, Umeå; Department of Informatics, University of Oslo,.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.
    Alander, Sara
    WHY DO THE ORDERS GO WRONG ALL THE TIME?: Exploring sustainability in an e-commerce application in Swedish public school kitchens2010In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 68-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss sustainability, particularly social and cultural sustainability, in relation to an e-commerce application used in the kitchen of a Swedish public school. The notion of sustainability got its public definition through the Brundtland Commission and the report Our Common Future in which ecological as well as economic and social dimensions were underlined. An additional dimension, culture, has recently unfolded. The data reported in this paper were collected in public school and pre-school meal production. This is a large, institutional, tax-funded activity in Sweden as all pre-schools, compulsory schools and most upper secondary schools serve free lunch to the children and students. We discuss how an e-commerce application complicated the daily routines in the school kitchen rather than making the ordering of food stuff easier or more flexible and how small things that mattered in the staff's day-to-day activities shed light on the application's problems and weaknesses. Following Agenda 21, we relate these shortcomings to sustainability and also to participation. The discussion builds on social and cultural sustainability and participatory design with a focus on the involvement of users in design and implementation of IT systems and services.

  • 4.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Practises of Internet Networking: A Resource for Alternative Political Movements2008In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 659-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past ten years, the political significance of the Internet has become a recurrent theme within the social science literature, with questions centring on the Internet's part in the emergence of political movements and in the reshaping of people's roles as citizens. These discussions have been predominantly theoretical and deterministic in nature, with the political significance of the Internet being viewed as a consequence of its features; for example, the Internet's network structure is addressed within this literature as a forerunner to a politics following network logic. For the most part, extant research has not told us much about the Internet's significance in individuals' everyday political engagement. This article aims to modestly compensate for this shortcoming by presenting empirical results from a study on the perception and use of the Internet among young people in four alternative political movements. Specifically, by drawing on semi-structured interviews with twenty-one activists and viewing the interview data through the lens of the ‘network metaphor’, the article illustrates and discusses three different networking practises in which the Internet is an important resource: (1) the activists' use of the Internet to maintain their organizations' network-like character, (2) their use of the Internet for networking within their organizations, and (3) their use of the Internet for networking in between different, alternative political organizations. The article concludes by discussing the potential significance of these networking practises for politics, and presenting a comparative outlook towards a similar, previous study of young members within established political parties' youth organizations.

  • 5.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Samuelsson, Ulli
    Jönköping University.
    Viscovi, Dino
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    At risk of exclusion?: Degrees of ICT access and literacy among senior citizens2018In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data derived from a nationwide postal survey (n = 1264) with a simple random sample of Swedes between ages 65 and 85 (response rate: 63%), the article analyses the general patterns of: (a) degrees of information and communication (ICT) access and (b) ICT-literacy among Swedish senior citizens. The overall patterns of access and literacy are analysed in light of senior citizens’ assets – conceptualized as material, discursive and social resources – and their age and gender. The analysis reveals a positive correlation between levels of material (e.g., income), discursive (e.g., English skills) and social (e.g., social networks) resources and access to ICT. With greater resources, the average number of devices increases. The analysis also reveals a positive correlation between discursive and social resources and ICT-literacy. Gender has no bearing on access to devices, but might have some effect on ICT-literacy. The correlation between age, access and literacy is negative. With increasing age, both access and literacy decreases. In this respect, the study reveals a generational effect. However, since all three resources tend to decrease over the life cycle, the results are also discussed in terms of an age effect. These data and our analyses are contextualized by a critical discussion that reflects on the implications of these general patterns: What do they mean for senior citizens’ abilities to be included and participate in a continuously digitalizing society?

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