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  • 1. Bramberg, Elisabeth Bjork
    et al.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Interpreters in Cross-Cultural Interviews: A Three-Way Coconstruction of Data2013In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our focus in this article is research interviews that involve two languages. We present an epistemological and methodological analysis of the meaning of qualitative interviewing with an interpreter. The results of the analysis show that such interviewing is not simply exchanging words between two languages, but means understanding, grasping the essential meanings of the spoken words, which requires an interpreter to bridge the different horizons of understanding. Consequently, a research interview including an interpreter means a three-way coconstruction of data. We suggest that interpreters be thoroughly introduced into the research process and research interview technique, that they take part in the preparations for the interview event, and evaluate the translation process with the researcher and informant after the interview.

  • 2.
    Bremer, Anders
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work. University of Borås.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Sandman, Lars
    University of Borås.
    Experiencing Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Significant Others’ Lifeworld Perspective2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1407-1420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When patients suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA), significant others find themselves with no choice about being there. Afterwards they are often left with unanswered questions about the life-threatening circumstances, or the patient’s death, the emergency treatment and future needs. When it is unclear how the care, and the event itself will affect significant others’ well being, prehospital emergency personnel face ethical decisions. This study describes the experiences of significant others present at OHCA, focusing on ethical aspects and values. Using a lifeworld phenomenological approach, seven significant others were interviewed. The essence of the phenomenon of OHCA can be stated as: Unreality in the reality; Overwhelming responsibility; Inadequacy and limitation; Hope and hopelessness; Ethical considerations; Insecurity about the future; Trembling of life. These study findings show how significant others’ sense of unreality, inadequacy, and overwhelming responsibility at OHCA can threaten values deemed important for a good life.

     

  • 3.
    Bremer, Anders
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Sandman, Lars
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    To Survive Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Search for Meaning and Coherence2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 323-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary responsibility of prehospital emergency personnel at out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) is to provide lifesaving care. Ethical considerations, decisions, and actions should be based in the patient’s beliefs about health and well-being. In this article, we describe patients’ experiences of surviving OHCA. By using a phenomenological approach, we focus on how OHCA influences patients’ well-being over time. Nine survivors were interviewed. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is described as a sudden and elusive threat, an awakening in perplexity, and the memory gap as a loss of coherence. Survival means a search for coherence with distressing and joyful understanding, as well as existential insecurity exposed by feelings of vulnerability. Well-being is found through a sense of coherence and meaning in life. The study findings show survivors’ emotional needs and a potential for prehospital emergency personnel to support them as they try to make sense of what has happened to them.

     

  • 4.
    Enarsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Sandman, PO
    Umeå University.
    Ove, Hellzén
    Mid-Sweden University.
    The preservation of order: the use of common approach among staff toward clients in long-term psychiatric care2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, ISSN ISSN 1049-7323, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 718-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors performed this grounded theory study to gain a deeper understanding of the kinds of social processes that lead to a need among psychiatric nursing staff to reach a common approach on how to act toward individual clients in long-term psychiatric care. They present a theory about the development of such common approaches among staff. The main findings were that in psychiatric group dwellings, when the internal order is perceived as having been disturbed, the staff preserve or restore the internal order by formulating and reaching a common approach. The staff negotiated with each other to achieve an agreement on how to act and behave toward the individual client. The authors isolate and describe different types of order-disturbing incidents and the common approaches taken by the staff in dealing with them. However, their data also show that staff often had difficulties in maintaining a common approach over time.

  • 5.
    Erlingsson, Christen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Family Caregivers’ Health in connection with providing care2012In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 640-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim was to investigate connections between Swedish family caregivers’ health and providing care for an ill relative by conducting a systematic search and synthesis of previous research. We analyzed 31 articles using first qualitative content analysis then hermeneutic analysis. Analysis resulted in three derived themes—sliding sideways into caregiving, caregiving in reciprocity, and caregiving in disintegration—and a main interpretation and conceptual model of Swedish family caregivers’ health—caregiving in a sphere of beliefs. Results indicated that Swedish family caregivers’ beliefs, experiences of reciprocity, or nonsupport, together with quality of interpersonal relationships and feelings of responsibility and guilt, have a profound impact on their health. These results point to the value and importance of nurses gaining an understanding of family caregivers’ beliefs and experiences of reciprocity or nonsupport to effectively promote family caregivers’ health.

  • 6.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Skaraborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Christiansen, Mats
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Sweden.
    Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless2016In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1252-1262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person’s health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Annelie
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Karin, Dahlberg
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Ekenstam, Claes
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    The meaning of close relationships and sexuality: Women’s well-being following a myocardial infarction2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 375-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relationships and sexuality following heart attack (MI) have been studied; nevertheless, little is known about the meaning of social support and relationships to health and well-being after an MI. To our knowledge, no qualitative studies have further investigated the phenomenon. In this study we explore the meaning of close relationships and sexuality to women's health and well-being following MI. Ten women were interviewed using a reflective lifeworld approach and phenomenological epistemology. The meaning of women's close relationships following an MI appears to be closely intertwined with their long-term health process; both health processes and the relationships are affected. Suffering after an MI can be compared to taking a fall in that close relationships can become a safety net. Close relationships and sexuality are integrated into their lived bodies, and in that way have profound influence in their lifeworld experiences. Not all close relationships are intimate; however, all close and meaningful relationships can provide power and strength to the women's health processes. At the same time, these relationships also appear to drain energy and cause suffering.

  • 8.
    Lindberg, Catharina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö University.
    Sivberg, Bengt
    Lund University.
    Befriending everyday life when bringing technology into the private sphere2017In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 843-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the findings of our phenomenological interview study concerning the meaning of being an autonomous person while dependent on advanced medical technology at home. This was elucidated in the participants' narratives as befriending everyday life when bringing technology into the private sphere. We discovered four constituents of the phenomenon: befriending the lived body, depending on good relationships, keeping the home as a private sphere, and managing time. The most important finding was the overall position of the lived body by means of the illness limiting the control over one's life. We found that the participants wanted to be involved in and have influence over their care to be able to enjoy autonomy. We therefore stress the importance of bringing the patients into the care process as chronic illness will be a part of their everyday life for a long time to come, hence challenging patient autonomy.

  • 9.
    Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Asp, Margareta
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Living with moderate-severe chronic heart failure as a middle-aged person.2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 4-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Sandgren, Anna
    et al.
    Kronoberg County, Research Center, Sweden.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Kronoberg County, Research Center, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Lund university, Sweden;Kronoberg County, Research Center, Sweden.
    Striving for emotional survival in palliative cancer nursing2006In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 79-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this grounded theory study, the authors analyze interviews and participant observation data related to palliative cancer nursing in hospitals. Striving for Emotional Survival emerged as the pattern of behavior through which nurses deal with their main concern, the risk of being emotionally overloaded by their work. It involved three main strategies: Emotional Shielding through Professional Shielding or Cold Shielding; Emotional Processing through Chatting, Confirmation Seeking, Self-Reflecting, or Ruminating; and Emotional Postponing through Storing or Stashing. Emotional Competence is a property of Striving for Emotional Survival that explains more or less adequate ways of dealing with emotional overload. The theory Striving for Emotional Survival can be useful in the nurses' daily work and provides a comprehensive framework for understanding how nurses deal with emotional difficulties. The authors suggest that health care organizations encourage self-care, prioritize time to talk, and offer counseling to nursing staff with emotionally difficult working conditions.

  • 11.
    Thulesius, Hans
    et al.
    Region Kronoberg.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Department of Community Medicine, Malmö.
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Kronoberg county Research Centre;Lund university.
    Balancing: a basic process in end-of-life cancer care.2003In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 13, no 10, p. 1353-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this grounded theory study, the authors interviewed caregivers and patients in end-of-life cancer care and found Balancing to be a fundamental process explaining the problem-solving strategies of most participants and offering a comprehensive perspective on both health care in general and end-of-life cancer care in particular. Balancing stages were Weighing--sensing needs and wishes signaled by patients, gauging them against caregiver resources in diagnosing and care planning; Shifting--breaking bad news, changing care places, and treatments; and Compensating--controlling symptoms, educating and team-working, prioritizing and "stretching" time, innovating care methods, improvising, and maintaining the homeostasis of hope. The Balancing outcome is characterized by Compromising, or "Walking a fine line," at best an optimized situation, at worst a deceit.

  • 12.
    van Wijngaarden, Els
    et al.
    Univ Humanist Studies, Netherlands.
    van der Meide, Hanneke
    Univ Humanist Studies, Netherlands.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Researching Health Care as a Meaningful Practice: Toward a Nondualistic View on Evidence for Qualitative Research2017In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 1738-1747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being able to describe how research findings become evidence is crucial in providing a justification for all kinds of research findings. However, qualitative researchers in health care, including those who conduct phenomenological research, are usually fairly modest when it comes qualifying their research findings as such. We advocate a view of evidence for phenomenological research, an approach that is rooted in philosophy of science, including perspectives of ontology, epistemology, and methodology. We suggest that phenomenology can become an exemplar for how qualitative research can make convincing arguments and thus can be better appreciated. In this article, we present a philosophical foundation for phenomenological evidence by exploring the notions of objectivity, validity, and generalizability in terms of openness, meaning, and essence.

  • 13.
    Åsbring, P.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    Linköpings universitet.
    Patient power and control: A study of women with uncertain illness trajectories2004In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 226-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors interviewed 12 women diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome and 13 with fibromyalgia with the aim of determining the strategies they perceive themselves as using to gain control over their situation during the health care process. The results highlight various strategies that the women report applying to find a way of managing the illness and to influence caregivers. They describe, for example, how they try to gain control over their situation by acquiring knowledge about the illness. The women also describe various power strategies they use in their interaction with the caregivers to take command of their situation, namely exiting, noncompliance, confrontation, persuasion/insistence, making demands, and demonstrative distancing. © 2004 Sage Publications.

  • 14.
    Åsbring, Pia
    et al.
    Centre for Development of Health Services, Department of Public Health Sciences at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    Linköpings universitet.
    Women's experiences of stigma in relation to chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia2002In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 148-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia are characterized by being difficidt to diagnose and having an elusive etiology and no clear-cut treatment strategy. The question of whether these illnesses are stigmatizing was investigated through interviews with 25 women with these illnesses. The women experienced stigmatization primarily before receiving a diagnosis, and the diffuse symptomatology associated with the illnesses were significant for stigmatization. Stigma consisted of questioning the veracity, morality, and accuracy of patient symptom descriptions and of psychologizing symptoms. Coping with stigma was also explored and found to comprise both withdrawal and approach strategies, depending on the individual's circumstances and goals.

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