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  • 1.
    Brandic, Ivona
    et al.
    University of Vienna.
    Pllana, Sabri
    University of Vienna.
    Benkner, Siegfried
    University of Vienna.
    Specification, Planning, and Execution of QoS-awareGrid Workflows within the Amadeus Environment2008In: Concurrency and Computation, ISSN 1532-0626, E-ISSN 1532-0634, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 331-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commonly, at a high level of abstraction Grid applications are specified based on the workflow paradigm. However, majority of Grid workflow systems either do not support Quality of Service (QoS), or provide only partial QoS support for certain phases of the workflow lifecycle. In this paper we present Amadeus, which is a holistic service-oriented environment for QoS-aware Grid workflows. Amadeus considers user requirements, in terms of QoS constraints, during workflow specification, planning, and execution. Within the Amadeus environment workflows and the associated QoS constraints are specified at a high level using an intuitive graphical notation. A distinguishing feature of our system is the support of a comprehensive set of QoS requirements, which considers in addition to performance and economical aspects also legal and security aspects. A set of QoS-aware service-oriented components is provided for workflow planning to support automatic constraint-based service negotiation and workflow optimization. For improving the efficiency of workflow planning we introduce a QoS-aware workflow reduction technique. Furthermore, we present our static and dynamic planning strategies for workflow execution in accordance with user-specified requirements. For each phase of the workflow lifecycle we experimentally evaluate the corresponding Amadeus components.

  • 2.
    Fahringer, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Jugravu, Alexandru
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Pllana, Sabri
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Prodan, Radu
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Seragiotto Jr., Clovis
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Truong, Hong-Linh
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    ASKALON: a tool set for clusterand Grid computing2005In: Concurrency and Computation, ISSN 1532-0626, E-ISSN 1532-0634, Vol. 17, no 2-4, p. 143-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance engineering of parallel and distributed applications is a complex task that iterates through various phases, ranging from modeling and prediction, to performance measurement, experiment management, data collection, and bottleneck analysis. There is no evidence so far that all of these phases should/can be integrated into a single monolithic tool. Moreover, the emergence of computational Grids as a common single wide-area platform for high-performance computing raises the idea to provide tools as interacting Grid services that share resources, support interoperability among different users and tools, and, most importantly, provide omnipresent services over the Grid. We have developed the ASKALON tool set to support performance-oriented development of parallel and distributed (Grid) applications. ASKALON comprises four tools, coherently integrated into a service-oriented architecture. SCALEA is a performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis tool of parallel and distributed applications. ZENTURIO is a general purpose experiment management tool with advanced support for multi-experiment performance analysis and parameter studies. AKSUM provides semi-automatic high-level performance bottleneck detection through a special-purpose performance property specification language. The PerformanceProphet enables the user to model and predict the performance of parallel applications at the early stages of development. In this paper we describe the overall architecture of the ASKALON tool set and outline the basic functionality of the four constituent tools. The structure of each tool is based on the composition and sharing of remote Grid services, thus enabling tool interoperability. In addition, a data repository allows the tools to share the common application performance and output data that have been derived by the individual tools. A service repository is used to store common portable Grid service implementations. A general-purpose Factory service is employed to create service instances on arbitrary remote Grid sites. Discovering and dynamically binding to existing remote services is achieved through registry services. The ASKALON visualization diagrams support both online and post-mortem visualization of performance and output data. We demonstrate the usefulness and effectiveness of ASKALON by applying the tools to real-world applications.

  • 3.
    Kessler, Christoph
    et al.
    Linköping University, IDA.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Optimized composition of performance-aware parallel components2012In: Concurrency and Computation, ISSN 1532-0626, E-ISSN 1532-0634, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 481-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the principles of a novel framework for performance-aware composition of sequential and explicitly parallel software components with implementation variants. Automatic composition results in a table-driven implementation that, for each parallel call of a performance-aware component, looks up the expected best implementation variant, processor allocation and schedule given the current problem, and processor group sizes. The dispatch tables are computed off-line at component deployment time by an interleaved dynamic programming algorithm from time-prediction meta-code provided by the component supplier. 

  • 4.
    Memeti, Suejb
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Pllana, Sabri
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Combinatorial optimization of DNA sequence analysis on heterogeneous systems2017In: Concurrency and Computation, ISSN 1532-0626, E-ISSN 1532-0634, Vol. 29, no 7, article id e4037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of DNA sequences is a data and computational intensive problem, and therefore, it requires suitable parallel computing resources and algorithms. In this paper, we describe our parallel algorithm for DNA sequence analysis that determines how many times a pattern appears in the DNA sequence. The algorithm is engineered for heterogeneous platforms that comprise a host with multi-core processors and one or more many-core devices. For combinatorial optimization, we use the simulated annealing algorithm. The optimization goal is to determine the number of threads, thread affinities, and DNA sequence fractions for host and device, such that the overall execution time of DNA sequence analysis is minimized. We evaluate our approach experimentally using real-world DNA sequences of various organisms on a heterogeneous platform that comprises two Intel Xeon E5 processors and an Intel Xeon Phi 7120P co-processing device. By running only about 5% of possible experiments, our optimization method finds a near-optimal system configuration for DNA sequence analysis that yields with average speedup of 1.6 ×  and 2 ×  compared with the host-only and device-only execution.

  • 5.
    Xhafa, Fatos
    et al.
    Technical University of Catalonia.
    Pllana, Sabri
    University of Vienna.
    Barolli, Leonard
    Fukuoka Institute of Technology.
    Spaho, Evjola
    Fukuoka Institute of Technology.
    Grid and P2P middleware for wide-area parallel processing2011In: Concurrency and Computation, ISSN 1532-0626, E-ISSN 1532-0634, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 458-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grid computing emerged as a paradigm for high-performance computing and massive parallel processing. Currently, Grid systems have become an important paradigm for efficiently solving large-scale complex problems from many fields. On the other hand, P2P paradigm originated from file-sharing, but each time more is being used for the development of large-scale distributed platforms. Grid and P2P systems have thus followed different trajectories pushed by different motivations, needs and research communities. In fact, both paradigms are evolving in a way that each time they are sharing more common characteristics and are mutually benefiting from their best features. Among these characteristics, we could distinguish the cooperative model for solving complex problems by exploiting their large computing capacity. As such, Grid and P2P systems have achieved notable success, in particular, for e-Science applications, a family of complex applications arising in science and engineering that need considerable computation power. Despite important advances in the design and use of Grid and P2P systems, they remain still difficult to implement and apply to real-life problems. The main difficulties reside in the lack of easy-to-use middleware for Grid and P2P, in the complexities of setting up and in the tedious task of deploying real-world Grid/P2P platforms as well as in experimental studies which are often complex and not easy to repeat. In this paper we survey and analyze the advances in communication libraries and middleware for both Grid and P2P systems as well as their limitations when used in real Grid and P2P infrastructures. We also bring examples of real-life applications of massive data processing that can be efficiently handled through Grid and P2P approaches.

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