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  • 1.
    Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Bohuslän Museum.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    Kalmar County Museum.
    Victor, Helena
    Kalmar County Museum.
    A moment frozen in time: evidence of a late fifth-century massacre at Sandby borg2018In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 92, no 362, p. 421-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Migration Period (c. AD 400–550) was characterised by political, social and economic instability. Recent excavations at Sandby borg ringfort on the island of Öland in Sweden have revealed indisputable evidence of a massacre which occurred at that time. Osteological, contextual and artefactual evidence strongly suggest that the fort was abandoned immediately following the attack and was left undisturbed throughout antiquity. Sandby borg offers a unique snapshot of domestic life and abrupt death in the Scandinavian Migration Period, and provides evidence highly relevant to studies of ancient conflict, and on social and military aspects of Iron Age and Migration Period societies.

  • 2.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Bredarör on Kivik:  a monumental cairn and the history of its interpretation2009In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 83, no 320, p. 359-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The famous monumental Bronze Age cairn Bredarör on Kivik with its decorated stone coffin or cist has been described as a ‘pyramid of the north’. Situating his work as the latest stage in a long history of interpretation that began in the eighteenth century, the author analyses the human bone that survived from the 1930s excavation and shows that the cist and chamber must have remained open to receive burials over a period of 600 years.

  • 3.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Academic critique and the need for an open mind (a response to Kristiansen)2008In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 490-492Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    et al.
    Emory University, USA.
    Larson, Lars
    Lund University.
    Zagorska, Ilga
    Latvian Academy of Art, Latvia.
    The Persistent Presence of the Dead: The Significance of Place and Time revealed by the recent excavations at the hunter-gatherer cemetery at Zvejnieki (Latvia)2013In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 87, no 338, p. 1016-1029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-known Mesolithic cemeteries of Northern Europe have long been viewed as evidence of developing social complexity in those regions in the centuries immediately before the Neolithic transition. These sites also had important symbolic connotations. This study uses new and more detailed analysis of the burial practices in one of these cemeteries to argue that much more is involved than social differentiation. Repeated burial in the densely packed site of Zvejnieki entailed large-scale disturbance of earlier graves, and would have involved recurrent encounters with the remains of the ancestral dead. The intentional use of older settlement material in the grave fills may also have signified a symbolic link with the past. The specific identity of the dead is highlighted by the evidence for clay face masks and tight body wrappings in some cases.

  • 5.
    Skoglund, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Joakim Goldhahn . Sagaholm: north European Bronze Age rock art and burial ritual. 2016. viii+140 pages, numerous b&w illustrations. Oxford & Havertown (PA): Oxbow; 978-1-78570-264-8 paperback £36.2017In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 91, no 357, p. 818-819Article, book review (Other academic)
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