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  • 1.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Stockholm University.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University.
    Women's entrepreneurship, neoliberalism and economic justice in the postfeminist era: a discourse analysis of policy change in Sweden2018In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 531-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the early 1990s, there has been investment in women's entrepreneurship policy (WEP) in Sweden, which continued until 2015. During the same period, Sweden assumed neoliberal policies that profoundly changed the position of women within the world of work and business. The goals for WEP changed as a result, from entrepreneurship as a way to create a more equal society, to the goal of unleashing women's entrepreneurial potential so they can contribute to economic growth. To better understand this shift we approach WEP as a neoliberal governmentality which offers women 'entrepreneurial' or 'postfeminist' subject positions. The analysis is inspired by political theorist Nancy Fraser who theorized the change as the displacement of socioeconomic redistribution in favour of cultural recognition, or identity politics. We use Fraser's concepts in a discourse analysis of Swedish WEP over two decades, identifying two distinct discourses and three discursive displacements. Whilst WEP initially gave precedence to a radical feminist discourse that called for women's collective action, this was replaced by a postfeminist neoliberal discourse that encouraged individual women to assume an entrepreneurial persona, start their own business, compete in the marketplace and contribute to economic growth. The result was the continued subordination of women business owners, but it also obscured or rendered structural problems/solutions, and collective feminist action, irrelevant.

  • 2.
    Jansson, Maria
    et al.
    1. LuleDept Business Adm & Social Science, Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo/University of Umeå,.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå University of Technology.
    Old dreams, new means: an exploration of visions and situated knowledge in information technology2007In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 371-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the tensions and ambivalences of new and old technology and political visions of keeping viable, quality care and services for elderly citizens through the use of new information technologies. The visions of politicians and social service managers of keeping alive the welfare state and retaining its ability to offer quality care and services for elderly citizens are compared with the experiences of female care assistants and their expectations of technology. A feminist figure - the cyborg - will be used in this exploration. We consider how care assistants are integrated in networks of socio-technical relations between humans and non-humans, and the extent to which gender or asymmetrical power relations between women and men intervene in their stories.

  • 3.
    Jonnergård, Karin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Stafsudd, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Elg, Ulf
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Performance evaluations as gender barriers in professional organizations: A study of auditing firms2010In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 721-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gendering processes often take the form of organizational subtexts, that is, seemingly gender-neutral practices that have gender implications. The purpose of this article is to study performance evaluations, which, based on management by objectives systems, may appear neutral, but tend to be based on male norms of what is regarded as good performance. We analysed the careers and performance evaluations of 391 newly licenced Swedish auditors, using an open-ended question survey. In this industry 50 per cent of new employees and 92 per cent of partners are men. Even in the early stages of their careers, there are notable differences between women and men. The women achieved less and show lower career ambitions and expectations as well as greater intentions to leave the auditing industry. Performance evaluations are also perceived differently, men focusing on what is evaluated (reflecting the perceptions of those at higher hierarchical levels) and women focusing on who does the evaluating and how.

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