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  • 1.
    Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Pecorari, Diane
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples Republic of China.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Words for what?: Contrasting university students' receptive and productive academic vocabulary needs2018In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 50, p. 28-39Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the objective of determining what academic vocabulary students use productively, and exploring the relationship between receptive and productive academic vocabulary, this paper continues the dialog on what constitutes academic vocabulary. By adopting a set of principled criteria (ratio, dispersion, discipline specificity and range) and by approximating the procedures from a recent study of academic vocabulary, the academic vocabulary found in students' writing is identified and subsequently compared to the academic vocabulary found in published academic writing (indexical of receptive purposes). Nearly 600 words emerge as being represented significantly more frequently in students' academic writing than in their non-academic writing, demonstrating that students distinguish in their writing between academic and non-academic vocabulary. Furthermore, the investigation finds significant differences between students' productive academic vocabulary and academic vocabulary serving receptive purposes, suggesting that students' productive and receptive academic vocabulary needs are far from identical. The findings reported here are intended to serve as a tool for EAP educators working to help students develop academic vocabulary fit for purpose, as well as an incentive for EAP researchers to continue to explore the nature of academic vocabulary. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Mežek, Špela
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Learning subject-specific L2 terminology: The effect of medium and order of exposure2015In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 38, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the globalised university environment, many university students are expected to learn subject-specific terminology in both the local language and the L2 (English) by learning from two media in two different languages: lectures in the local language and reading in L2 English. These students' bilingual learning is greatly affected by the learning strategies they employ. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of student choice of learning media and the order of media on their learning and perception of learning of terminology in English. The results confirm that added exposure to terminology in different media, even in different languages, contributes to learning and show that, in some circumstances, learning terminology from reading may be more effective than learning it from a lecture. The results also show that students do not correctly judge their knowledge of terms learnt from different media in different languages and that they underestimate knowledge gained from reading in L2. Implications for teaching are discussed.

  • 3.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Multilingual Higher Education: Beyond English Medium Orientations2015In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 40, p. 59-60Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Plagiarism, Intellectual Property and the Teaching of L2 Composition2013In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 122-123Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Thøgersen, Jacob
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Lecturing undergraduate science in Danish and in English: A comparison of speaking rate and rhetorical style2011In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 209-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the consequences of L2 use in university lectures. Data in the study stem from parallel lectures held by the same experienced lecturer in Danish (L1) and English (L2). It is found that the lecturer takes 22% longer to present the same content in L2 compared to L1, and that the lecturer speaks 23% more slowly in L2 than in L1.

    In the second part of the paper these differences are investigated through a qualitative analysis of parallel extracts from the same data set. Here it is found that when teaching in English the lecturer uses a higher degree of repetition and adopts a more formal and condensed style as compared to the rhetorical style in L1. Finally, the potential consequences of these quantitative and qualitative differences for student learning are discussed

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