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  • 1.
    Bruhn, Jørgen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    ”’Seeing without Understanding’: Mediality aspects of Literature and Memory in Vladimir Nabokov’s ”Spring in Fialta”2015In: Orbis Litterarum, ISSN 0105-7510, E-ISSN 1600-0730, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 380-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking as my starting point the intermedial idea that all literary texts exhibit some kind of medial mixture, the article argues that Vladimir Nabokov's formally exquisite and existentially moving short story Spring in Fialta (which I analyze in Nabokov's own English translation from Russian) is best understood when it is considered a mixed mediality text. I hope to demonstrate the general idea that when a conventionally literary text is being read as a medially mixed text the role of media turns out to be crucial for the understanding of the entire text. More specifically, I shall argue that the schism between artistic representation and life in itself, condensed into the problem of how to represent and recall memory traces, is a major theme in Spring in Fialta.

  • 2.
    Elleström, Lars
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Visual Iconicity in Poetry: Replacing the Notion of “Visual Poetry”2016In: Orbis Litterarum, ISSN 0105-7510, E-ISSN 1600-0730, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 437-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for the advantage of applying the analyticalperspective of “visual iconicity in poetry,” rather than trying todelimit the problematic category of “visual poetry,” which hasbeen understood to be a type of poetry that deviates fromnormal poetry in and through its visual characteristics (forinstance, poems looking like physical objects). However, visualityis actually an irrelevant feature for the specific character of“visual poetry”; it is iconicity that makes the difference. Whereasvisuality is a sensory trait, iconicity is a semiotic trait consistingof meaning created by way of resemblance, and these twoqualities must not be conflated.

    In order to illustrate the line of reasoning, two rather differentpoems are analyzed. No scholars refer to Sylvia Plath’s “I AmVertical” as “visual,” but in addition to being visual this poempossesses a certain level of iconicity. Eugen Gomringer’s“Wind,” on the other hand, is a standard example of “visualpoetry.” Also this poem is certainly visual, even though it is notvisuality but a high degree of iconicity that sets it apart frompoetry such as Plath’s. In fact, what is generally but misleadinglyreferred to as “visual poetry” is characterized by extensiveiconicity.

  • 3.
    Lutas, Liviu
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    L'intermédialité comme méthode d'analyse textuelle: L'exemple de Patrick Chamoiseau2018In: Orbis Litterarum, ISSN 0105-7510, E-ISSN 1600-0730, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 80-100, article id OLI12163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    Cet article a deux objectifs. Pour commencer, nous présentons lathéorie intermédiale actuelle telle qu’elle s’est établie principalement dans la recherche allemande et suédoise, par exemple dans les travaux de Werner Wolf et de Lars Elleström. Ensuite, nous appliquons cette théorie sur l’oeuvre de l’écrivain martiniquais contemporain Patrick Chamoiseau. Dans une première étape, nous abordons plusieurs aspects intermédiaux de cette oeuvre d’une perspective générale, avant de nous lancer dans une analyse textuelle de quelques extraits de trois romans –Biblique des derniers gestes (2002), Solibo Magnifique (1988) et L’empreinte à Crusoé (2012) – où l’intermédialité est mise en oeuvre de manière particulièrement intéressante. Notre parcours montre non seulement que Chamoiseau est actif dans plusieurs médias, mais que son écriture est hautement intermédiale. Il traite le médium de l’écriture de manière flexible et ouverte, non pas comme une entité essentialiste et stable. Notre conclusion est que l’originalité de l’oeuvre chamoisienne peut mettre à l’épreuve la théorie de l’intermédialité de manière constructive, sans pour autant l’invalider.

  • 4.
    Lutas, Liviu
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Mircea Cartarescu en suédois: Entre sourcisme et ciblisme2017In: Orbis Litterarum, ISSN 0105-7510, E-ISSN 1600-0730, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 51-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I analyze the reception of a Romanian writer in Sweden, looking in particular at the translation and at the influence that the translation might have on the reception. The book in question is the first volume of Mircea Cartarescu's trilogy Orbitor, published in 1996 and entitled Orbitor. Aripa stânga in Romanian, and translated into Swedish in 2004 as Orbitor. Vänster vinge. I wil concentrate on the choice of the Swedish translator Inger Johansson whether to achieve a transparent text (or naturalising it) or an opaque text (exotisizing it) for the Swedish readers. I will base my analyses on the theoretical discussions about the two different translation strategies: « sourcière » (source oriented) or « cibliste » (target-oriented), underligning particularly the cultural and ethical consequences of a choice between these. In doing so, I will compare the Swedish translation with the French and English translation, in order to detect the translation strategies.

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