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  • 1.
    Gyllenberg, Mats
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Hanski, Ilkka
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lindström, Torsten
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Conditional reproductive strategies under variable environmental conditions2017In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 54, no 1-4, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the framework of adaptive dynamics we consider the evolution by natural selection of reproductive strategies in which individualsmay adjust their reproductive behaviour in response to changing environmental conditions. As a specific example we consider a discrete-time model in which possible fluctuations in the environmental conditions are caused by predator-prey interaction. Our main findings include: 1) Coexistence between two fixed strategies (i.e., strategies that do not adjust to changing environmental conditions) is impossible. There exists a best fixed strategy, which invades and ousts all other fixed strategies. 2) A necessary condition for conditional (adjustable) strategies to evolve is that there are fluctuations in the environmental conditions. Predator-prey interactions may cause such fluctuations and under natural assumptions there exists an optimal conditional strategy which is uninvadable and invades and ousts allother strategies.

  • 2.
    Tinnert, Jon
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Berggren, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Forsman, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Population-specific effects of interbreeding and admixture on reproductive decisions and offspring quality2016In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 53, no 1-2, p. 55-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated interbreeding and admixture in Tetrix subulata grasshoppers from two maternal origin populations that differed in life-history and dispersal traits. We compared reproductive output of females that had been experimentally mated with males from the same or from a different population. Interbreeding affected clutch size and number of clutches; in one population females in the admixed treatment produced smaller clutches, in the other population females in the admixed treatment produced more clutches. Behavioral observations indicated that individuals can discriminate scents emitted by individuals from different populations; such that females might adjust reproductive allocation depending on male origin. However, hatchability of eggs and survival of nymphs were not affected by the mating treatment. Admixture influenced the production of viable offspring in the F2 generation, but the effect was opposite in the two populations of maternal origin. Results suggested that responses to interbreeding and admixture can differ between populations within a species.

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