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  • 1. Elmerstig, Eva
    et al.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Linköping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Unit Gender & Med, S-58183 Linköping.
    Prioritizing the partner's enjoyment: a population-based study on young Swedish women with experience of pain during vaginal intercourse2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 82-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines the prevalence of women who continue to have vaginal intercourse (VIC) despite pain, avoid telling the partner, and feign enjoyment. It also considers the reasons for this behavior. A sample of 1566 female senior high school students (aged 18-22 years) completed a questionnaire concerning their experiences and attitudes toward their body and sexuality. Forty-seven percent (270/576) of those women who reported pain during VIC continued to have VIC despite the pain. The most common reasons were that they did not want to spoil sex for or hurt the partner by interrupting VIC. Feigning enjoyment and not telling the partner about their pain were reported by 22 and 33%, respectively. Continuing to have VIC despite pain was associated with feelings of being inferior to the partner during sex, dissatisfaction with their own sex lives and feigning enjoyment while having pain. Pain during VIC is reported by every third young Swedish woman, and almost half of those still continue to have VIC. The major reason given is noteworthy - prioritizing the partner's enjoyment before their own - and indicates that young women who continue to have VIC despite pain take a subordinate position in sexual interactions.

  • 2.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Benzein, Eva
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Reasons for non-attendance at cervical screening as reported by non.attendees in Sweden2008In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Benzein, Eva
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The first pelvic examination – a transition into womanhood2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 28, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Palmetun Ekbäck, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Örebro Universitet.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    We feel rejected - experiences of women with hirsutism consulting physicians.2011In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 157-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe how women with hirsutism experience their relationship with health care. Data were collected by tape-recorded individual interviews, which were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the relationship with health care, from the perspective of patients with hirsutism, is suboptimal.

  • 5.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköpings universitet.
    Abuse in health care: results of an intervention model with Forum Theatre2010In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 31, no Supplement: 1, p. 8-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Berterö, Carina
    Nullified: Women's perceptions of being abused in health care2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 161-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Staff´s awareness of abuse in health care varies according to context and possibilities to act2011In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 65-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to explore awareness of abuse in health care (AHC) from a staff perspective. Patient evaluation studies often focus on patient satisfaction, and serious negative experiences might therefore be obscured. In our research, we have found that abuse in health care (AHC) is commonly reported by male and female patients, when asked for in a strait way, but so far no intervention studies against AHC have been published. Investigating staff's awareness of AHC is our first step toward developing interventions against AHC.

    Study design. Data were collected at a Swedish clinic of obstetrics and gynecology. Qualitative interviews with 21 informants were analysed with constant comparative analyses.

    Results. The core category – ‘Staff's awareness of AHC varies according to context and possibilities to act’ – was derived from the interaction between five categories; Moral imagination, Relativism, Explanations, Dissociation from AHC and Acting against AHC. Awareness of AHC was not a permanent state that did/did not exist as all participants displayed both high and low awareness; depending on the context.

    Conclusion. Staff's awareness depends on more than personal characteristics; therefore, AHC interventions have to target individual behavior as well as cultures and structures in health care.

  • 8.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Zbikowski, Anke
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköpings universitet.
    Ethical lapses: staff's perception of abuse in health care2010In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 123-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Studies have shown high lifetime prevalence of abuse in health care (AHC) in Nordic gynaecological patients. For patients AHC implies feeling disempowered, dehumanised and devalued. The aim of our study was to apprehend health care staff's perceptions of AHC.

    Study design. Qualitative interviews with staff at a Swedish gynaecological clinic analysed by Constant comparative analysis (N = 21).

    Results. The two categories – ethical failures against a patient and staff members avoid responsibility – gives two disparate pictures of what AHC is. The interviews showed that these pictures can exist alongside even if they contradict each other. The core category ‘ethical lapses’ brings staff's contradictory reflections on AHC together in one picture. Notable is that the dualistic notion of AHC did not result in a moral conflict within staff members.

    Conclusion. Health care staff perceives AHC primarily as ethical lapses. Avoiding responsibility for AHC might lead to a failing recognition of AHC, implying that the problem is not properly dealt with. Our study highlights the need for a more open attitude in health care staff toward AHC. To counteract AHC, staff members need to accept that AHC occurs also in their own units, bringing in moral conflicts in the everyday work.

  • 9.
    Wijma, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    University of Bristo.
    Hammarström, Nevija Cah
    Linköpings universitet.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköpings universitet.
    Cycles of abuse nurtured by concealment: a clinical report2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 155-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, health care staff do not seem to have sufficient knowledge about their patients' abusive experiences. The aim of the present study is to analyze and discuss what the implications might be for the encounter between patients and health care professionals, when experiences of abuse are concealed. The methodology of this article is varied: a personal narrative, medical records, sociological theoretical literature and empirical evidence. From the narrative we learn that concealment of abuse was devastating for the patient. She was “treated” in vain as a correct diagnosis was not made, while abuse by her father continued. Health care staff also violated her, which she told her therapist, but her protests were not acknowledged. Ten years of treatment thus made her even more sick. This case story focuses on the mechanisms which nurture concealment of a patient's history of abuse, such as structural and symbolic violence. We also suggest ways to break “cycles of abuse”. Help the patient to stop concealing also means that she/he leaves a victim role, gets in charge of the situation and takes a first step towards empowerment. In this way, health care settings can become enabling and empowering environments.

  • 10. Wijma, Barbro
    et al.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköpings universitet.
    What is an error?2005In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 233-235Article in journal (Other academic)
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