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  • 1.
    Rabasa, Sonia G
    et al.
    Spain.
    Granda, Elena
    Spain.
    Benavides, Raquel
    Spain.
    Kunstler, Georges
    France.
    Espelta, Josep M
    Spain.
    Ogaya, Romá
    Spain.
    Peñuelas, Josep
    Spain.
    Scherer‐Lorenzen, Michael
    Germany.
    Gil, Wojciech
    Poland.
    Grodzki, Wojciech
    Poland.
    Ambrozy, Slawomir
    Poland.
    Bergh, Johan
    SLU, Umeå.
    Hódar, José A.
    Spain.
    Zamora, Regino
    Spain.
    Valladares, Fernando
    Spain.
    Disparity in elevational shifts of European trees in response to recent climate warming2013In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 2490-2499Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Reyer, Christopher P. O.
    et al.
    Potsdam Inst Climate Impact Res, Germany.
    Leuzinger, Sebastian
    Auckland Univ Technol, New Zealand;ETH, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Inst Bot, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland.
    Rammig, Anja
    Potsdam Inst Climate Impact Res, Germany.
    Wolf, Annett
    ETH, Switzerland.
    Bartholomeus, Ruud P.
    KWR Watercycle Res Inst, Netherlands.
    Bonfante, Antonello
    Natl Res Council Italy, Italy.
    de Lorenzi, Francesca
    Natl Res Council Italy, Italy.
    Dury, Marie
    Univ Liege, Belgium.
    Gloning, Philipp
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Abou Jaoude, Renee
    Univ Tuscia, Italy.
    Klein, Tamir
    Weizmann Inst Sci, Israel.
    Kuster, Thomas M.
    ETH, Switzerland;Swiss Fed Res Inst WSL, Switzerland.
    Martins, Monica
    Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    Niedrist, Georg
    European Acad Bolzano Bozen, Italy;Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Riccardi, Maria
    Natl Res Council Italy, Italy.
    Wohlfahrt, Georg
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    de Angelis, Paolo
    Univ Tuscia, Italy.
    de Dato, Giovanbattista
    Univ Tuscia, Italy.
    Francois, Louis
    Univ Liege, Belgium.
    Menzel, Annette
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Pereira, Marizia
    Univ Evora, Portugal.
    A plant's perspective of extremes: terrestrial plant responses to changing climatic variability2013In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 75-89Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review observational, experimental, and model results on how plants respond to extreme climatic conditions induced by changing climatic variability. Distinguishing between impacts of changing mean climatic conditions and changing climatic variability on terrestrial ecosystems is generally underrated in current studies. The goals of our review are thus (1) to identify plant processes that are vulnerable to changes in the variability of climatic variables rather than to changes in their mean, and (2) to depict/evaluate available study designs to quantify responses of plants to changing climatic variability. We find that phenology is largely affected by changing mean climate but also that impacts of climatic variability are much less studied, although potentially damaging. We note that plant water relations seem to be very vulnerable to extremes driven by changes in temperature and precipitation and that heatwaves and flooding have stronger impacts on physiological processes than changing mean climate. Moreover, interacting phenological and physiological processes are likely to further complicate plant responses to changing climatic variability. Phenological and physiological processes and their interactions culminate in even more sophisticated responses to changing mean climate and climatic variability at the species and community level. Generally, observational studies are well suited to study plant responses to changing mean climate, but less suitable to gain a mechanistic understanding of plant responses to climatic variability. Experiments seem best suited to simulate extreme events. In models, temporal resolution and model structure are crucial to capture plant responses to changing climatic variability. We highlight that a combination of experimental, observational, and/or modeling studies have the potential to overcome important caveats of the respective individual approaches.

  • 3.
    Trondman, Anna-Kari
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mazier, F.
    Toulouse Univ Le Mirail, France.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Tallinn Univ, Estonia.
    Fyfe, R.
    Univ Plymouth, UK.
    Nielsen, Anne Birgitte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund University;Univ Göttingen, Germany.
    Twiddle, C.
    Univ Aberdeen, UK.
    Barratt, P.
    Queens Univ Belfast, UK.
    Birks, H. J. B.
    Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Bjune, A. E.
    Uni Res Climate, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Norway.
    Bjorkman, L.
    Brostrom, A.
    Caseldine, C.
    David, R.
    Dodson, J.
    Doerfler, W.
    Fischer, E.
    van Geel, B.
    Giesecke, T.
    Hultberg, T.
    Kalnina, L.
    Kangur, M.
    van der Knaap, P.
    Koff, T.
    Kunes, P.
    Lageras, P.
    Latalowa, M.
    Lechterbeck, J.
    Leroyer, C.
    Leydet, M.
    Lindbladh, M.
    Marquer, Laurent
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund Univ.
    Mitchell, F. J. G.
    Odgaard, B. V.
    Peglar, S. M.
    Persson, T.
    Poska, A.
    Roesch, M.
    Seppa, H.
    Veski, S.
    Wick, L.
    Pollen-based quantitative reconstructions of Holocene regional vegetation cover (plant-functional types and land-cover types) in Europe suitable for climate modelling2015In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 676-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present quantitative reconstructions of regional vegetation cover in north-western Europe, western Europe north of the Alps, and eastern Europe for five time windows in the Holocene [around 6k, 3k, 0.5k, 0.2k, and 0.05k calendar years before present (bp)] at a 1 degrees x1 degrees spatial scale with the objective of producing vegetation descriptions suitable for climate modelling. The REVEALS model was applied on 636 pollen records from lakes and bogs to reconstruct the past cover of 25 plant taxa grouped into 10 plant-functional types and three land-cover types [evergreen trees, summer-green (deciduous) trees, and open land]. The model corrects for some of the biases in pollen percentages by using pollen productivity estimates and fall speeds of pollen, and by applying simple but robust models of pollen dispersal and deposition. The emerging patterns of tree migration and deforestation between 6k bp and modern time in the REVEALS estimates agree with our general understanding of the vegetation history of Europe based on pollen percentages. However, the degree of anthropogenic deforestation (i.e. cover of cultivated and grazing land) at 3k, 0.5k, and 0.2k bp is significantly higher than deduced from pollen percentages. This is also the case at 6k in some parts of Europe, in particular Britain and Ireland. Furthermore, the relationship between summer-green and evergreen trees, and between individual tree taxa, differs significantly when expressed as pollen percentages or as REVEALS estimates of tree cover. For instance, when Pinus is dominant over Picea as pollen percentages, Picea is dominant over Pinus as REVEALS estimates. These differences play a major role in the reconstruction of European landscapes and for the study of land cover-climate interactions, biodiversity and human resources.

  • 4.
    van der Jeugd, Henk P
    et al.
    SOVON Dutch Centre for Field Ornithology, The Netherlands ; Vogeltrekstation Dutch Centre for Avian Migration and Demography, The Netherlands.
    Eichhorn, Götz
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Litvin, Konstantin E
    Bird Ringing Centre, Russia.
    Stahl, Julia
    University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Larsson, Kjell
    Gotland University.
    van der Graf, Alexandra J
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Drent, Rudi H
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Keeping up with early springs: rapid range expansion in an avian herbivore incurs a mismatch between reproductive timing and food supply2009In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1057-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within three decades, the barnacle goose population wintering on the European mainland has dramatically increased in numbers and extended its breeding range. The expansion has occurred both within the Arctic as well as by the colonization of temperate areas. Studies of performance of individuals in expanding populations provide information on how well species can adapt to novel environments and global warming. We, therefore, studied the availability of high quality food as well as timing of reproduction, wing moult, fledgling production and postfledging survival of individually marked geese in three recently established populations: one Arctic (Barents Sea) and two temperate (Baltic, North Sea). In the Barents Sea population, timing of hatching was synchronized with the peak in food availability and there was strong stabilizing selection. Although birds in the Baltic and North Sea populations bred 6–7 weeks earlier than Arctic birds, timing of hatching was late in relation to the peak in food availability, and there was moderate to strong directional selection for early breeding. In the Baltic, absolute timing of egg laying advanced considerably over the 20-year study period, but advanced little relative to spring phenology, and directional selection on lay date increased over time. Wing moult of adults started only 2–4 weeks earlier in the temperate populations than in the Arctic. Synchronization between fledging of young and end of wing moult decreased in the temperate populations. Arctic-breeding geese may gradually accumulate body stores from the food they encounter during spring migration, which allows them to breed relatively early and their young to use the peak of the Arctic food resources. By contrast, temperate-breeding birds are not able to acquire adequate body stores from local resources early enough, that is before the quality of food for their young starts to decrease. When global temperatures continue to rise, Arctic-breeding barnacle geese might encounter similar problems.

  • 5.
    van Langevelde, Frank
    et al.
    Wageningen Univ, Netherlands.
    Braamburg-Annegarn, Marijke
    Wageningen Univ, Netherlands;De Vlinderstichting Dutch Butterfly Conservat, Netherlands.
    Huigens, Martinus E.
    De Vlinderstichting Dutch Butterfly Conservat, , Netherlands.
    Groendijk, Rob
    De Vlinderstichting Dutch Butterfly Conservat, , Netherlands.
    Poitevin, Olivier
    De Vlinderstichting Dutch Butterfly Conservat, Netherlands.
    van Deijk, Jurrien R.
    De Vlinderstichting Dutch Butterfly Conservat, Netherlands.
    Ellis, Willem N.
    Zool Museum, Netherlands.
    van Grunsven, Roy H. A.
    De Vlinderstichting Dutch Butterfly Conservat, Netherlands;Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Germany;Wageningen Univ, Netherlands.
    de Vos, Rob
    Nat Biodivers Ctr, Netherlands.
    Vos, Rutger A.
    Nat Biodivers Ctr, Netherlands.
    Franzén, Markus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Germany.
    WallisDeVries, Michiel F.
    De Vlinderstichting Dutch Butterfly Conservat, Netherlands;Wageningen Univ, Netherlands.
    Declines in moth populations stress the need for conserving dark nights2018In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 925-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the global continuous rise, artificial light at night is often considered a driving force behind moth population declines. Although negative effects on individuals have been shown, there is no evidence for effects on population sizes to date. Therefore, we compared population trends of Dutch macromoth fauna over the period 1985-2015 between moth species that differ in phototaxis and adult circadian rhythm. We found that moth species that show positive phototaxis or are nocturnally active have stronger negative population trends than species that are not attracted to light or are diurnal species. Our results indicate that artificial light at night is an important factor in explaining declines in moth populations in regions with high artificial night sky brightness. Our study supports efforts to reduce the impacts of artificial light at night by promoting lamps that do not attract insects and reduce overall levels of illumination in rural areas to reverse declines of moth populations.

1 - 5 of 5
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