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  • 1.
    Alfsdotter, Clara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Social implications of unburied corpses from intergroup conflicts: postmortem agency following the Sandby borg massacre2019In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 427-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A massacre took place inside the Sandby borg ringfort, southeast Sweden, at the end of the fifth century. The victims were not buried, but left where they died. In order to understand why the corpses were left unburied, and how they were perceived following the violent event, a theoretical framework is developed and integrated with the results of osteological analysis. I discuss the contemporary normative treatment of the dead, social response to death and postmortem agency with emphasis on intergroup conflict and ‘bad death’. The treatment of the dead in Sandby borg deviates from known contemporary practices. I am proposing that leaving the bodies unburied might be viewed as an aggressive social action. The corpses exerted postmortem agency to the benefit of the perpetrators, at the expense of the victims and their sympathizers. The gain for the perpetrators was likely political power through redrawing the victim's biographies, spatial memory and the social and territorial landscape. The denial of a proper death likely led to shame, hindering of regeneration and an eternal state of limbo.

  • 2.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Gärdenfors, Peter
    Lund University ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Larsson, Lars
    Lund University ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Knowing, Learning and Teaching: How Homo Became Docens2015In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 847-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the relation between knowing, learning and teaching in relation to early Palaeolithic technologies. We begin by distinguishing between three kinds of knowl- edge: knowing how, knowing what and knowing that. We discuss the relation between these types of knowledge and different forms of learning and long-term memory systems. On the basis of this analysis, we present three types of teaching: (1) helping and correcting; (2) showing; and (3) explaining. We then use this theoretical framework to suggest what kinds of teaching are required for the pre-Oldowan, the Oldowan, the early Acheulean and the late Acheulean stone-knapping technologies. As a general introductory overview to this special section, the text concludes with a brief presentation of the papers included. 

  • 3.
    Lombard, Marlize
    et al.
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Haidle, Miriam N.
    Senckenberg Research Institute, Germany.
    Cognition: From Capuchin Rock Pounding to Lomekwian Flake Production2019In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 201-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it is sometimes suggested that modern-day chimpanzee nut-cracking behaviour is cognitively similar to early stone-tool-knapping behaviour, few systematic comparative studies have tested this assumption. Recently, two further techno-behaviours were reported that could both represent intermediary phases in hominin cognitive evolution pertaining to our ultimate technological astuteness. These behaviours are that of bearded capuchin monkeys pounding rocks and very early stone-tool knapping from Lomekwi 3. Here we use a multi-model approach to directly compare cognitive aspects required for 11 techno-behaviours, ranging from the simplest capuchin pounding behaviour to the most complex chimpanzee nut-cracking and Lomekwi 3 knapping behaviours. We demonstrate a marked difference in broad-spectrum cognitive requirements between capuchin pounding on the one hand and Lomekwian bipolar knapping on the other. Whereas the contrast is less pronounced between chimpanzee nut-cracking scenarios and basic passive-hammer knapping at Lomekwi 3, the escalation in cognitive requirement between nut cracking and bipolar knapping is a good indication that early hominin flaking techniques are cognitively more taxing than chimpanzee nut-cracking behaviour today.

  • 4.
    May, Sally K.
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Johnston, Iain G.
    Australian National University, Australia.
    Taçon, Paul S. C.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Domingo Sanz, Inés
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Griffith University, Australia.
    Early Australian Anthropomorphs: Jabiluka's Dynamic Figure Rock Paintings2018In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 67-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early depictions of anthropomorphs in rock art provide unique insights into life during the deep past. This includes human engagements with the environment, socio-cultural practices , gender and uses of material culture. In Australia, the Dynamic Figure rock paintings of Arnhem Land are recognized as the earliest style in the region where humans are explicitly depicted. Important questions, such as the nature and signicance of body adornment in rock art and society, can be explored, given the detailed nature of the human gurative art and the sheer number of scenes depicted. In this paper, we make a case for Dynamic Figure rock art having some of the earliest and most extensive depictions of complex an-thropomorph scenes found anywhere in the world.

  • 5.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    [Review of] The Archaeology of the Dead: Lectures in Archaeothanatology, by Henri Duday, 2009. Translated by Anna Maria Cipriani and John Pearce.: Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-1-84217-356-5 paperback £30 & US$60; x+158 pp., 143 figs.2010In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 478-479Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ranta, Michael
    et al.
    Sichuan Univ, Peoples Republic of China;Lund University, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Redei, Anna Cabak
    Lund University, Sweden;Copenhagen Business Sch, Denmark.
    Persson, Tomas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Levels of Narrativity in Scandinavian Bronze Age Petroglyphs2019In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 497-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, Scandinavia holds the largest concentration of rock art (i.e. petroglyphs), created c. 5000-first century BC, many of them showing figurative and seemingly narrative representations. In this paper, we will discuss possible narratological approaches applied to these images. We might reasonably distinguish between three levels of pictorial narrativity: representations of (i) single events, understood as the transition from one state of affairs to another, usually involving (groups of) agents interacting; (ii) stories, e.g. particular sequences of related events that are situated in the past and retold for e.g. ideological or religious purposes; and (iii) by implication, master-narratives deeply embedded in a culture, which provide and consolidate cosmological explanations and social structures. Some concrete examples of petroglyphs will be presented and analysed from narratological and iconographical perspectives. We will as a point of departure focus on (i), i.e. single events, though we shall also further consider the possibility of narrative interpretations according to (ii) and (iii).

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