lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brutemark, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Wilhelm
    Carbon isotope signature variability among cultured microalgae: Influence of species, nutrients and growth2009In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 372, no 1-2, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we have investigated whether the carbon isotopic signature differs between different groups and species of marine phytoplankton depending on growth phase, nutrient conditions and salinity. The 15 investigated algal species, representing the Bacillariophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Cryptophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Dinophyceae and Haptophyceae classes were grown in batch monocultures and analysed for delta(13)C in both exponential and stationary phase. For all the cultured species, delta(13)C signatures ranged from -23.5 parts per thousand (Imantonia sp.) to - 12.3 parts per thousand (Nodulania spumigena) in the exponential phase and from - 18.8 parts per thousand (Amphidinium carterae) to - 8.0 parts per thousand (Anabaena lemmermannii) in the stationary phase. Three species (Dunaliella tertiolecta, Rhodomonas sp.. Heterocapsa triquetra) were also grown under nutrient sufficient and nitrogen or phosphorus deficient conditions. Nitrogen limitation resulted in a more negative delta(13)C signature, whereas no effect could be observed during phosphorus limitation compared to nutrient sufficient conditions. Growth of Prymnesium parvum in two different salinities resulted in a more negative delta(13)C signature in the 26 parts per thousand-media compared to growth in 7 parts per thousand-media. Our results show that the carbon isotopic signature of phytoplankton may be affected by salinity, differ among different phytoplankton species, between exponential and stationary phase, as well as between nutrient treatments.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Lunds Universitet.
    Granéli, Edna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Wilhelm
    Lunds Universitet.
    Gonzalez Rodriguez, Eliane
    IEAPM, Arraial do Cabo, Brazil .
    Carvalho, Wanderson F
    IEAPM, Arraial do Cabo, Brazil .
    Brutemark, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bacterial and phytoplankton nutrient limitation in tropical marine waters, and a coastal lake in Brazil2012In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 418-419, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioassay experiments were performed two times (with 2 years in between) in order to investigate if nitrogen(N, ammonium), phosphorus (P, phosphate) and carbon (C, glucose) additions would stimulate the growth ofbacteria and phytoplankton differently in three different tropical aquatic environments. The water and theirindigenous microbial communities were taken from a freshwater coastal lake (Cabiunas), a coastal (Anjos),and an offshore marine station (Sonar) in the Atlantic outside Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Ammonium,phosphate and glucose were added alone or in combination to triplicate bottles. In the lake, P seemedto be the primary limiting factor during the first experiment, since both bacterial production and phytoplanktongrowth was stimulated by the P addition. Two years later, however, addition of P inhibited phytoplanktongrowth. During both years, C was closely co-limiting for bacteria since CP additions increased the responseconsiderably. For both the coastal and offshore seawater stations, phytoplankton growth was clearly stimulatedby N addition in both years and the bacteria responded either to the P, N or C additions (alone or incombination). To conclude, the results from these tropical aquatic systems show that it is possible that phytoplanktonand bacteria may compete for a common resource (P) in lakes, but can be limited by different inorganicnutrients in marine waters as well as lakes, suggesting that phytoplankton and bacteria do notnecessarily compete for the same growth limiting nutrient in these environments.

  • 3.
    Engstedt, Olof
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Koch-Schmidt, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Larsson, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Strontium (Sr) uptake from water and food in otoliths of juvenile pike (Esox lucius L.)2012In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 418-419, p. 69-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The strontium (Sr) or Sr:Ca ratio in otoliths has been widely used in the last decade to describe the migration

    histories of fish between fresh and marine waters. However, reference experimental studies of particular

    species and waters are necessary to confirm the underlying assumptions and evaluate the applicability of

    this tool to field data. Laboratory experiments indicated that juvenile, anadromous pike (Esox lucius L.)

    from the Baltic Sea reared in successively increasing salinities (from 0 to 7) for 110 d accumulated Sr

    in their otoliths according to a positive relationship with waterborne Sr. When the pike were given prey

    fish from brackish (7) environments, the otolith Sr:Ca ratio increased more than in fish given prey

    from freshwater lakes. Pike held at constant salinity (7) and given prey fish from the same salinity

    environment had an Sr:Ca ratio of 6.9Å~103. The ratio decreased successively for fish given prey

    from freshwater (4.4Å~103) or kept in freshwater and given food from brackish water (3.1Å~103).

    Fish exposed to freshwater and given prey fish from freshwater displayed no increase in Sr:Ca ratio

    (1.6Å~103). The experiments demonstrated that the Sr:Ca ratio may be used to describe the migration

    history of pike between rivers and the Baltic Sea. The maximum Sr:Ca value for pike given marineorigin

    food corresponded to those of fish collected from the Baltic Sea.

  • 4.
    Granéli, Edna
    et al.
    Department of Marine Ecology, University of Lund.
    Odete Moreira, Maria
    Effects of river water of different origin on the growth of marine dinoflagellates and diatoms in laboratory cultures1990In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 89-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypothesis that acid humic-rich river water selectively favours dinoflagellates in comparison to diatoms in coastal waters was tested in two sets of laboratory experiments using unialgal cultures of marine phytoplankton. In the first experiment, three dinoflagellates, i.e., Prorocentrum minimum (Pav.) J. Schiller, P. micans Ehrenberg and Amphidinium carterae Hulburt, and three diatoms, i.e., Attheya decora T. West, Skeletonema costatum (Grev.) Cleve and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin, were grown in a mixture of 80% coastal (S 20%.) and 20% river water. Water from seven different rivers was used. Four rivers had a high humic content (yellow substance 22.1 ± 0.9 · m−1) but lower inorganic N and P concentrations ("forest rivers") while three rivers ("agricultural rivers") had a lower humic content (10.7 ± 1.3 · m−1) but inorganic nutrient concentrations approximately three times as high as the forest rivers. The growth rates for the dinoflagellates were significantly higher in the medium with forest river water compared to the mixtures with agricultural river water while the opposite was true for the diatoms. In the second type of experiment, the diatom Ditylum brightwellii (T. West) Grun and the dinoflagellate P. minimum were grown, as semicontinuous dilution cultures, in mixtures of 90% coastal water (S 20%.) and 10% river water. Water from four different rivers was used, one draining mainly agricultural soils and the other acidified humic-rich forested soils. River water of agricultural origin supported a higher D. brightwellii biomass and growth rate than river water draining forested soils while for P. minimum the opposite was true. Decreasing cell P quotas and increasing alkaline phosphatase activity indicated that D. brightwellii was P-deficient, especially when agricultural river water was added, while these physiological indices suggested that P. minimum cultures were not P-starved. Our results support the hypothesis that the discharge of acidified river water, rich in humic substances, to coastal waters, can play a role in shifting the species composition from diatoms to dinoflagellates. 

  • 5.
    Granéli, Edna
    et al.
    UNIV LUND, DEPT MARINE BOT, BOX 124, S-22100 LUND, SWEDEN .
    Sundbäck, K
    The response of planktonic and microbenthic algal assemblages to nutrient enrichment in shallow coastal waters, Southwest Sweden1985In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 253-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field and laboratory nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) enrichment experiments were performed using natural phytoplankton and microphytobenthic assemblages from the brackish water Öresund, S.W. Sweden. The response of algae from a low-nutrient area (Falsterbo Canal) was compared to that of algae from a polluted, nutrient-rich area (Lomma Bay).

    The biomass (measured as chlorophyll a) of both phytoplankton and microphytobenthos from the Falsterbo Canal increased after the addition of nitrogen. Phytoplankton growth was stimulated by the addition of phosphorus to the nitrogen-rich water of the polluted Lomma Bay. Sediment chlorophyll a showed no significant increase after the addition of nutrients in the Lomma Bay. In containers without sediment, phytoplankton uptake was calculated to account for ≈ 90% of the disappearance of inorganic fixed nitrogen from the water. In the sediment containers the microphytobenthos was estimated to account for ≈20% of the nitrogen uptake. The rest was presumably lost mainly through denitrification.

    When containers with microphytobenthos from Lomma Bay were kept in the dark, phosphorus was released at a rate of up to ≈ 180 μM · m−2 · day−1. We suggest that by producing oxygen microbenthic algae keep the sediment surface oxygenated thereby decreasing phosphorus transport from the sediment to the overlying water. 

  • 6.
    Hylander, Samuel
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Jephson, Therese
    Lunds universitet.
    UV protective compounds transferred from a marine dinoflagellate to its copepod predator2010In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 389, no 1-2, p. 38-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planktonic organisms living in surface waters can be exposed to harmful levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), but few studies have examined accumulation of UV protective compounds in marine zooplankton. Zooplankters are suggested to lack the ability to synthesize these substances and hence must accumulate them from their algal food. Here, we show that both phytoplankton (dinoflagellates) and their zooplankton grazers (copepods) respond strongly to UVR exposure by, respectively, synthesizing and accumulating the natural sunscreens mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). In our experiment, the MAAs content increased approximately four times in dinoflagellates exposed to UVR and PAR, as compared to non-UVR controls only receiving PAR (PAR = photosynthetically active radiation). The elevated MAAs level in the dinoflagellates was mirrored in the copepods, which accumulated more MAAs when exposed to UVR as compared to a non-UVR treatment. Overall, copepods accumulated approximately 2-5% of the total MAAs pool. Other UV protective compounds, like carotenoids, were however not accumulated by the copepods. The ability of some species to produce or accumulate photoprotective compounds may lead to increased fitness, and thus these taxa may become more dominant in plankton communities.

  • 7.
    Sakshaug, E
    et al.
    Trondhjem Biological Station, University of Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway.
    Graneli, Edna
    Department of Marine Botany, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Elbrächter, M
    Biologische Anstalt Helgoland, Litoralstation List/Sylt, FRG.
    Kayser, H
    Biologische Anstalt Helgoland, Litoralstation List/Sylt, FRG.
    Chemical composition and alkaline phosphatase activity of nutrient-saturated and P-deficient cells of four marine dinoflagellates1984In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 77, p. 241-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four marine dinoflagellates, Amphidinium carterae Hulburt, Ceratium tripos (O.F. Müll.) Nitzsch, Prorocentrum minimum (Pav.) J. Schiller, and Scrippsiella trochoidea (Stein) Loeblich III were grown as dilution cultures at 18°C, S = 29%. and 30 μE·m−2·s−1 at L:D = 14:10 h. In nutrient-saturated cultures, the growth rates (doubl·day−1) ranged from 0.38 for Scrippsiella to 0.80 for Prorocentrum, and carbon content (pg·cell−1) from 83 for Amphidinium to 6900 for Ceratium. The atomic N/C ratio was 0.13–0.15, but for Ceratium it was 0.088, because of its thick, cellulose theca. The atomic N/P ratio ranged from 12–13 for Ceratium and Scrippsiella to 15–17 for Prorocentrum and Amphidinium. Under P-deficient conditions (growth rate 39–70% of the maximum), cellular P decreased considerably, but so did N, so that the N/P ratio was only slightly affected. There was a concomitant increase in carbon content per cell of 1.2- to 1.7-fold. Alkaline phosphatase activity was virtually nil in nutrient-saturated cells, but was readily demonstrable in all species when P-deficient. 

  • 8.
    Waldeck, Peter
    et al.
    Gotland University.
    Larsson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy. Gotland University.
    Effects of winter water temperature on mass loss in Baltic blue mussels: implications for foraging sea ducks2013In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 444, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water temperature may through its effects on body mass, reproductive output and recruitment of bivalves also influence organisms higher up the food chain. The small sized Baltic blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus × Mytilus edulis) is a dominant key species in the Baltic Sea food web and it is an important food source for sea ducks such as the common eider (Somateria mollissima) and the long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) and for some species of fish. Possible links between winter water temperature and the quality of blue mussels as food for wintering sea ducks were investigated by measuring the soft body mass loss of mussels during winter in an experimental set-up and in the field. Results demonstrated that warmer water temperatures in winter had a significant negative effect on soft body mass of Baltic blue mussels. Analysed mussels, on average 15 mm in length, kept in experimental aquaria between January and March and exposed to a 3.6 °C elevated water temperature regime corresponding to conditions during mild winters, had about 11% smaller tissue dry mass in March than mussels exposed to a water temperature regime corresponding to conditions in cold winters. At two field study areas, the body mass loss of mussels from October to March in a mild winter was significant and more pronounced (15% and 19%, respectively) than in a cold winter (11% and 4% respectively). This difference is of importance because in winter and spring, sea ducks build up energy stores for the subsequent breeding season by consuming large quantities of blue mussels and the energy gain of the birds per dive will be affected by the soft body tissue content of the mussels. The results improve our possibilities to predict the seasonal and yearly variation of the quality of the main food of sea ducks and help us to better understand the causes for the variable reproductive success and the present population declines of sea ducks. The results may also improve our possibilities to model the effects on Baltic Sea food webs of possible future increases in water temperature.

  • 9. Weich, R G
    et al.
    Granéli, Edna
    Department of Marine Ecology, University of Lund.
    Extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity in Ulva lactuca L1989In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 129, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) was detected in the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca, cultivated in laboratory conditions under phosphate limitation. Algal discs were grown in continuous light and in darkness for a maximum of 205 h in sterilized seawater supplied with ammonium nitrate and various phosphate concentrations. APA and phosphate uptake in U. lactuca was stimulated in light whereas inhibition was detected in darkness. APA increased significantly during the cultivation in a phosphate-deficient medium but was suppressed at high external phosphate concentrations. In addition, pretreatment in penicillin over 48 h markedly enhanced enzyme activity during P limitation. The pretreatment in penicillin reduced the number of surface-associated bacteria. Our results indicate that APA in U. lactuca was dependent on the external phosphate concentration, energy from photophosphorylation and bacteria. Since intracellular polyphosphates and an orthophosphate pool still were displayed in 31P NMR spectra after cultivation at phosphate-limiting conditions, P deficiency was not suggested. Unfortunately, NMR spectra reflect total amounts of P compounds and local differences in the P status of the multicellular tissue could not be distinguished. Postulating a negative correlation between the P status and APA, a lower P status in meristematic areas during P limitation was suggested. Alkalisation of the growth medium during algal growth in light, and/or intracellular pH changes may additionally have affected enzyme production. 

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf