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  • 1.
    Betzholtz, Per-Eric
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ehrig, Anja
    Lindeborg, Mats
    Dinnetz, Patrik
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Food plant density, patch isolation and vegetation height determine occurrence in a Swedish metapopulation of the marsh fritillary butterfly Euphydryas aurinia2007In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 11, p. 343-350Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Franzén, Markus
    et al.
    Betzholtz, Per-Eric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Species traits predict island occupancy in noctuid moths2012In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 155-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowing how species’ traits relate to processes that underlie occupancy patterns such as colonisation and population persistence, is important for our understanding of how species survive in fragmented and changing landscapes. We used automatic UV light-traps to sample noctuidmoths on two remote islands, and compared traits of island occupants with those of a species pool from mainland southeast Sweden. Widely distributed species, generalist species, species with a long adult activity period and species active late in the summer had higher probability of occupancy on the remote islands. The results were consistent between islands. The traits of host plant specificity and species with an adult activity period during late summer remained robust and were statistically significant after controlling for any possible phylogenetic bias. This indicates that species exhibiting those traits survive better when habitat and climate changes. It is crucial to includeour results in; (1) conservation planning, e.g. when devising conservation measures in fragmented landscapes; (2) for predictions of future occupancy patterns; and (3) ecosystem impact assessments, e.g. the importance of moths as pollinators, herbivores and being the functional link between parasitoids, plants, consumers and predators.

  • 3.
    Franzén, Markus
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Germany.
    Schrader, Julian
    Univ Göttingen, Germany.
    Sjöberg, Göran
    Avellaneda Museum, Gävle.
    Butterfly diversity and seasonality of Ta Phin mountain area (N. Vietnam, Lao Cai province)2017In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 465-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human pressures on the environment are changing spatially and temporally, with profound implications for the planet's biodiversity. Butterflies are important indicators for environmental change and are a suitable group to detect areas of high conservation concern and prioritize conservation efforts. To obtain data to support urgently-needed conservation measures, we surveyed the butterfly fauna in a mountainous region of northern Vietnam, using transect counts over 8 months (121 survey days) from June 2014 to April 2015. In total, we recorded > 26,000 butterflies belonging to 231 species, including at least two species new to Vietnam, three red-listed and protected species listed by CITES. Most species were rare: we recorded members of 100 species ae<currency>5 times and 52 species just once. Males dominated the sample, accounting for 81% of all observed butterflies and all members of 84 observed species. Species richness and abundance were highest in July, and there were surprisingly large changes in species composition between months. Species richness curves reached saturation, indicating that we detected most species present in the area, except for members of two families (Lycaenidae and Hesperiidae). Our results highlight the importance of thorough studies using standardized methods, capable of detecting most species in an area, over a whole season. There are urgent needs to integrate butterflies into conservation programs and use their potential as indicator species of habitat degradation and land use intensity.

  • 4.
    Polic, Daniela
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Fiedler, Konrad
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Nell, Christopher
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Grill, Andrea
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Mobility of ringlet butterflies in high-elevation alpine grassland: effects of habitat barriers, resources and age2014In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 1153-1161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersal is a crucial feature for the long-term survival of metapopulations. Each individual that leaves the habitat and enters the matrix takes a risk. Consequently, even winged organisms, like butterflies, are often extremely sedentary and spend much of their lifetime in very restricted areas. For such species, large roads may be a serious obstacle for movement. Here, we aim to study if a large and highly frequented road in an alpine environment hinders the movement of relatively sedentary butterflies of the genus Erebia. We conducted a mark-release-recapture study on six alpine Erebia species (E. eriphyleE. epiphronE. gorgeE. pharteE. pandrose and E. nivalis) in the Hohe Tauern National Park, Austria. We measured the following variables which we hypothesize to affect movement probability: (a) species identity, (b) nectar resource availability, (c) butterfly age or (d) patch isolation through the road. Population density estimates ranged from 230 ± 35 individuals for E. pharte to 1,316 ± 205 individuals for E. epiphron per hectare. More than 50 percent of recaptured butterflies were tracked within distances of <25 m. The maximum flight distance recorded was 332 m (E. epiphron). Our data indicate that species identity generally did not have a significant effect on mobility patterns in the studied Erebia butterflies. Only one species, E. pharte, was more likely to change the plot than the others. High resource availability decreased butterfly movement. Age influenced mobility, with mid-aged butterflies being most likely to move between patches. The road hindered dispersal. Butterflies which had to cross the road to get to another suitable habitat patch were less likely to move than butterflies that did not have to cross the road.

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