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  • 1.
    Crossland, Michael
    et al.
    Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK ; Anglia Ruskin University, UK.
    Macedo, António Filipe
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Use of tablet computers and e-readers by people with visual impairment2014In: Clinical and experimental optometry, ISSN 0816-4622, E-ISSN 1444-0938, Vol. 97, p. e19-e19, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We have observed many people with visual impairment using tablet computers and electronic books and have previously shown that these devices can be used by people with relatively low visual acuity and contrast sensitivity.

    Method: An online survey was advertised to people with visual impairment using personal contacts, social media and online discussion groups. Participants were asked to specify whether they used tablet computers and/or electronic books and if so, which device they used, what they used the device for and which accessibility functions they used.

    Results: Forty-four of 75 (59 per cent) respondents used a tablet computer. Of these, 30 (65 per cent) used an Apple iPad. All tablet users accessed the internet on their device and more than half read electronic books, took photographs and used apps. The ability to enlarge print was seen as the most useful accessibility option, cited by 76 per cent. Forty-nine per cent used contrast adjustment and 58 per cent used speech. Only 16 of the 75 respondents (22 per cent) used an electronic reader. Enlarged print was the most popular accessibility option on ereaders.

    Conclusions: Tablet computers are widely used by people with visual impairment. Large print is the most commonly used accessibility option, although speech and contrast reversal are also frequently used.

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