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  • 1.
    Aaby, Jacqueline
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    ¿La motivación es importante, o no…?: Una investigación sobre la motivación en los pasos 1 y 3 de ELE del instituto sueco 2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Helen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The British hedgerow in Sweden: Dealing with spatial differences and reader differences related to the author-reader relationship and culture-specific referents aided by a translation-oriented text analysis model2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Agnell, Emma
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Terminology and function hybridity: A functionalist approach to the translation of an art history book2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay discusses two aspects of the retention of pragmatic text functions in translation. The functionalist approach that was used focuses on achieving congruence between the author’s intended function and the perception of the reader, i.e., the target text’s actual function. The first aim was to examine whether a focus on text functions can be beneficial when translating terminology. The second aim was to investigate if a functionalist approach can be used to assure that all functions are retained for instances where the source text encompasses more than one pragmatic function. For the purposes of this study, two excerpts from Fritz Eichenberg’s art history book The Art of the Print were translated. Individual terms as well as instances where the source text segment contained one than more pragmatic function were then analyzed with the above mentioned aims in mind. It was found that a functionalist approach, in combination with a conceptual approach to terminology, was beneficial when translating terminology. It was also observed that the surrounding co-text aided in the understanding of the author’s concept. In regard to the second aim, it was found that while a functionalist approach assured that the translator was made aware of the existing functions, the translation procedures suggested were too narrow and static to be applicable to all segments.

  • 4.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Disciplinary literacy2013In: Scientific literacy: Teori och praktik / [ed] Eva Lundqvist, Roger Säljö, Leif Östman, Malmö, Sweden: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2013, p. 41-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta kapitel läggs fram ett nytt begrepp, disciplinary literacy, som ett alternativ till scientific literacy. För varje ämne, disciplinary literacy inriktar sig mot kommunikativa praktiker inom tre miljöer: akademin, arbetsplatsen och samhället och definieras som förmågan att delta i dessa ämnesrelaterade kommunikativa praktiker på ett lämpligt sätt. Frågeställningen för kapitlet är om det kan vara givande att betrakta främjandet av studenters disciplinary literacy som ett av de huvudsakliga målen med universitetsstudier. Tillämpningen av begreppet illustreras genom material hämtat från ett forskningsprojekt där högskolelärare i fysik från Sverige och Sydafrika diskuterar de lärandemål de har för sina studenter.

  • 5.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    From stimulated recall to disciplinary literacy: Summarizing ten years of research into teaching and learning in English2015In: English-Medium Instruction in European Higher Education: English in Europe. Volume 3 / [ed] Dimova, S. Hultgren, A-K. Jensen, C., Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2015, p. 157-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter summarizes my research work in Swedish higher education in the area of teaching and learning in English. Sweden makes for a particularly interesting case study since there are high levels of English competence in the general population and a large percentage of university courses have traditionally been taught through the medium of English.

    The work I have done falls into three broad categories:  University learning in English, University teaching in English and Disciplinary differences in attitudes to English language use.

    Over the years I have used a range of data collection techniques including video recordings of lectures, semi-structured interviews, questionnaires and stimulated recall. The research work is almost exclusively qualitative in nature adopting a case study approach.

  • 6.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Lecturing in English: Comparing fluency and content in L1 and L22013In: ICLHE 2013: Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education. University of Maastricht, Netherlands, 11-13 April, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a noticeable trend in many countries towards teaching university courses in English. However, from a research perspective, difficulties in obtaining comparative data have meant that little is known about what happens when lecturers change teaching language in this way.

    The work presented here follows eighteen lecturers of various disciplines from two Swedish universities who are in the process of changing their teaching language to English. The lecturers were all participants on a teaching in English training course (7.5 ECTS). As part of the course the lecturers gave ten-minute mini-lectures in their first language in a subject area that they usually teach. The following week, the lecturers gave the same lectures again in English.

    The lecture transcripts were analysed in terms of the content presented and comparative fluency. The majority of the lecturers present very similar content in both languages. However, all the lecturers speak more slowly and have shorter runs and more hesitations in their English lectures. There are a number of important differences in the ways in which lecturers dealt with this ‘slowing down’ in English, ranging from making changes to their pedagogical approach to running over time or cutting off the whole end of the lecture.

    In earlier studies lecturers who regularly teach in English suggest they do not notice much difference when teaching in one language or another. However, qualitative analysis of the 18 lecturers’ course reflections (approximately 60 000 words) shows that they were acutely aware of their limitations when teaching in English.

    This analysis provides further insights into the experiences of lecturers who are in the process of changing teaching language and a number of pedagogical recommendations are made.

  • 7.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Stockholm University.
    Tarja Nikula, Emma Dafouz, PatMoore and Ute Smit (Eds.). Conceptualising integration in CLIL and multilingual education. (2016),Bristol: Multilingual Matters. 276 pp., ISBN978-1-78309-613-8 (PBK).2017In: ESP Today - Journal of English for Specific Purposes at Tertiary Level, E-ISSN 2334-9050, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 297-302Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Berge, Maria
    Umeå University.
    Music and physics don’t mix!: What the humorous misuse of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources can tell us about disciplinary boundaries.2014In: The 5th International 360 Conference. Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark, Aarhus: Aarhus University , 2014, p. 21-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming part of an academic discipline has been described both in terms of becoming fluent in a disciplinary discourse (Airey 2009; Airey & Linder 2009; Northedge 2002) and achieving disciplinary literacy (Airey 2011, 2013; Geisler 1994). In this paper we investigate disciplinary boundaries by documenting the responses of academics to a semiotic disciplinary hybrid. The hybrid we use is the Physikalisches Lied, a bogus piece of sheet music into which disciplinary-specific semiotic resources from the realm of physics have been incorporated to humorous effect.

    The piece is presented to three distinct disciplinary focus groups: physicists, musicians and a group of academics who have had little contact with either discipline. In order to elicit disciplinary responses that are free from researcher prompts, each focus group is first asked the simple, open-ended question What do you see here? Once discussion of this question is exhausted the focus groups are asked to identify as many puns as they can—essentially all the disciplinary items that they feel have been misappropriated—and to attempt to explain what this means from a disciplinary standpoint. The differences in the responses of the three groups are presented and analysed.

    We argue that the semiotic resources focused on by each of the three groups and the nature of the explanation offered provide evidence of the degree of integration into the disciplines of physics and music. Our findings shed light on the process of becoming a disciplinary insider and the semiotic work involved in this process.

  • 9.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Larsson, Johanna
    Uppsala University.
    What Knowledge Do Trainee Physics Teachers Need to Learn?: Differences in the Views of Training Staff2014In: International Science Education Conference ISEC 2014, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 25-27 November, 2014, Singapore: Ministry of Education, National Institute of Education , 2014, p. 62-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the impact of disciplinary differences on teaching and learning has been extensively discussed in the literature (e.g. Becher 1989; Becher and Trowler 2001; Lindblom-Ylännea et al. 2006; Neumann 2001; Neumann and Becher 2002), little research has explored this issue in relation to teacher training. In particular, we know of no work that examines differing views about the knowledge that trainee teachers need to learn across different settings. In this paper we analyse differences in the expressed views of staff involved in the training of prospective physics teachers in three environments: the education department, the physics department and schools. We analyse these differences in terms of two constructs: disciplinary literacy goals (Airey 2011, 2013) and disciplinary knowledge structures (Bernstein 1999).

    In terms of disciplinary literacy we find a stronger emphasis on learning goals for the academy expressed by informants from the physics and education departments. This can be contrasted with the view that the needs of the workplace are paramount expressed by school practitioners.

    Then, using Bernstein’s knowledge structures, we also identify clear differences in views about the nature of knowledge itself with a more hierarchical view of knowledge prevalent in the physics department and the more horizontal view of knowledge prevalent in the education department.

    The study highlights the often-conflicting signals about what constitutes useful knowledge that prospective physics teachers need to negotiate during their training. We tentatively suggest that more attention should be paid to both the theory/practice divide and potential epistemological differences in the training of prospective teachers.

  • 10.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Lauridsen, Karen M.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Rasanen, Anne
    University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Salo, Linus
    Stockholm University.
    Schwach, Vera
    Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education, Norway.
    The expansion of English-medium instruction in the Nordic countries: Can top-down university language policies encourage bottom-up disciplinary literacy goals?2017In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 561-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, in the wake of the Bologna Declaration and similar international initiatives, there has been a rapid increase in the number of university courses and programmes taught through the medium of English. Surveys have consistently shown the Nordic countries to be at the forefront of this trend towards English-medium instruction (EMI). In this paper, we discuss the introduction of EMI in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). We present the educational setting and the EMI debate in each of these countries and summarize relevant research findings. We then make some tentative suggestions for the introduction of EMI in higher education in other countries. In particular, we are interested in university language policies and their relevance for the day-to-day work of faculty. We problematize one-size-fits-all university language policies, suggesting that in order for policies to be seen as relevant they need to be flexible enough to take into account disciplinary differences. In this respect, we make some specific suggestions about the content of university language policies and EMI course syllabuses. Here we recommend that university language policies should encourage the discussion of disciplinary literacy goals and require course syllabuses to detail disciplinary-specific language-learning outcomes.

  • 11.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Linder, Anne
    Uppsala University.
    Mayaba, Nokhanyo
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa.
    Webb, Paul
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa.
    Problematising Disciplinary Literacy in a Multilingual Society: The Case of University Physics in South Africa2013In: 21st Annual Conference of the Southern African Association for Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa, 14 - 17 January, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over a decade has passed since Northedge (2002) convincingly argued that the role of the university lecturer should be viewed as one of leading students on excursions into the specialist discourse of their field. In his view, disciplinary discourses have come into being in order to create and share disciplinary knowledge that could not otherwise be appropriately construed in everyday discourse. Thus, Northedge’s conclusion is that in order for disciplinary learning to occur, students will need explicit guidance in accessing and using the specialist discourse of their chosen field. Building on this work, Airey (in press) argues that all university lecturers are, at least to some extent, teachers of language—even in monolingual settings. A radical approach to this claim has been suggested by Wickman and Östman (2002) who insist that learning itself be treated as a form of discourse change.

    In an attempt to operationalise Wickman and Östman’s assertion, Airey (2011b) suggests that the goals of any undergraduate degree programme may be framed in terms of the development of disciplinary literacy. Here, disciplinary literacy is defined as the ability to appropriately participate in the communicative practices of a discipline. Further, in his subsequent work, Airey (2011a) claims that all disciplines attempt to meet the needs of three specific sites: the academy, the workplace and society. He argues that the relative emphasis placed on teaching for these three sites will be different from discipline to discipline and will indeed vary within a discipline depending on the setting. In the South African setting two questions arise from this assertion. The first is: For any given discipline, what particular balance between teaching for the academy, the workplace and society is desirable and/or practicable? The second question follows on from the first: Having pragmatically decided on the teaching balance between the academy, workplace and society, what consequences does the decision have for the language(s) that lecturers should be helping their students to interpret and use? In order to address these two questions we conducted an interview-based case study of the disciplinary literacy goals of South African university lecturers in one particular discipline (physics). Thus, our overarching research question is as follows: How do South African physics lecturers problematise the development of disciplinary literacy in their students?

    The data collected forms part of a larger international comparative study of the disciplinary literacy goals of physics lecturers in Sweden and South Africa. A disciplinary literacy discussion matrix (Airey, 2011a) was employed as the starting point for conducting in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 20 physics lecturers from five South African universities. The choice of these five universities was purposeful—their student cohorts encompassing a range of different first languages and cultural backgrounds. The interviews were conducted in English, lasted between 30 and 60 minutes, and were later transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were then analysed qualitatively. This involved “working with data, organizing it, breaking it into manageable units, synthesizing it, searching for patterns, discovering what is important and what is to be learned, and deciding what you will tell others” (Bogdan & Biklen, 1992:145).

    The main finding of this study is that all the lecturers mentioned language as being problematic in some way. However, there were a number of important differences in the ways the lecturers problematise the development of disciplinary literacy both across and within the different university physics departments. These differences can be seen to involve on the one hand, the lecturers’ own self-image in terms of whether they are comfortable with viewing themselves as language teachers/literacy developers, and on the other hand, their recognition of the diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds of their students. The differences will be illustrated and discussed using transcript excerpts. These findings are in contrast to parallel data collected in Sweden. In that particular (bilingual) setting, language was viewed as unproblematic, and the most striking characteristic was the very similarity of the responses of physics lecturers (Airey, in press). It is thus suggested that the differences in findings between Sweden and South Africa are a product of the latter’s diverse multilingual and multicultural environment. One pedagogical conclusion is that, given the differences in approach we find, inter- and intra faculty discussions about undergraduate disciplinary literacy goals would appear to have the distinct potential for reforming undergraduate physics. Similarly, an administrative conclusion is that a one-size-fits-all language policy for universities does not appear to be meaningful in such a diverse multilingual/multicultural environment.

    Finally, it should be mentioned that our choice of physics as an exemplar in this study has important implications for the interpretation of the findings. Drawing on Bernstein (1999), Martin (2011) suggests that disciplines have predominantly horizontal or hierarchical knowledge structures. Here it is claimed that physics has the most hierarchical knowledge structure of all disciplines. Thus, the findings presented here should be taken as illustrative of the situation in disciplines with more hierarchical knowledge structures (such as the natural and applied sciences). Kuteeva and Airey (in review) find that the issue of the language of instruction in such disciplines is viewed as much less problematic than in disciplines with more horizontal knowledge structures (such as the arts, humanities and, to some extent, social sciences). See Bennett (2010) for a provocative discussion of language use in such disciplines.

  • 12.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Social semiotics in university physics education: Leveraging critical constellations of disciplinary representations2015In: Science Education Research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future / [ed] Jari Lavonen, Kalle Juuti, Jarkko Lampiselkä, Anna Uitto, Kaisa Hahl, European Science Education Research Association , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social semiotics is a broad construct where all communication is viewed as being realized through signs and their signification. In physics education we usually refer to these signs as disciplinary representations. These disciplinary representations are the semiotic resources used in physics communication, such as written and oral languages, diagrams, graphs, mathematics, apparatus and simulations. This alternative depiction of representations is used to build theory with respect to the construction and sharing of disciplinary knowledge in the teaching and learning of university physics. Based on empirical studies of physics students cooperating to explain the refraction of light, a number of theoretical constructs were developed. In this presentation we describe these constructs and examine their usefulness for problematizing teaching and learning in university physics. The theoretical constructs are: fluency in semiotic resources, disciplinary affordance and critical constellations.

    The conclusion formulates a proposal that has these constructs provide university physics teachers with a new set of meaningfully and practical tools, which will enable them to re-conceptualize their practice in ways that have the distinct potential to optimally enhance student learning.

  • 13.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Urban, Eriksson
    Uppsala University ; Kristianstad University.
    A Semiotic Analysis of the Disciplinary Affordances of the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram in Astronomy2014In: The 5th International 360 Conference, Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark, Aarhus: Aarhus University , 2014, p. 22-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the central characteristics of disciplines is that they create their own particular ways of knowing the world through their discourse (Airey & Linder 2009). This process is facilitated by the specialization and refinement of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources over time. Nowhere is this truer than in the sciences, where it is the norm that disciplinary-specific representations have been introduced and then refined by a number of different actors (Airey 2009). As a consequence, many of the semiotic resources used in the sciences today still retain some traces of their historical roots. This makes the aquisition of disciplinary literacy (Airey, 2013) particularly problematic (see Eriksson et al. 2014 for an example from astronomy).

     In this paper we analyse one such disciplinary-specific semiotic resource from the field of Astronomy—the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We audit the potential of this semiotic resource to provide access to disciplinary knowledge—what Fredlund et al (2012) have termed its disciplinary affordances. Our analysis includes consideration of the use of scales, labels, symbols, sizes and colour. We show how, for historical reasons, the use of these aspects in the resource may differ from what might be expected by a newcomer to the discipline.

    We suggest that some of the issues we highlight in our analysis may, in fact, be contributors to alternative conceptions and therefore propose that lecturers pay particular attention to the disambiguation of these features for their students.

  • 14.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Urban, Eriksson
    Uppsala University ; Kristianstad University.
    What do you see here?: Using an analysis of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in astronomy to create a survey of disciplinary discernment.2014In: The first Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics, Lund, Sweden, 25-27 Sept 2014, 2014, p. 52-53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming part of a discipline involves learning to interpret and use a range of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources (Airey, 2009). These resources have been developed and assigned particular specialist meanings over time. Nowhere is this truer than in the sciences, where it is the norm that disciplinary-specific representations have been introduced and then refined by a number of different actors in order to reconcile them with subsequent empirical and theoretical advances. As a consequence, many of the semiotic resources used in the sciences today still retain some (potentially confusing) traces of their historical roots. However, it has been repeatedly shown that university lecturers underestimate the challenges such disciplinary specific semiotic resources may present to undergraduates (Northedge, 2002; Tobias, 1986).

    In this paper we analyse one such disciplinary-specific semiotic resource from the field of Astronomy—the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. First, we audit the potential of this semiotic resource to provide access to disciplinary knowledge—what Fredlund et al (2012) have termed its disciplinary affordances. Our analysis includes consideration of the use of scales, labels, symbols, sizes and colour. We show how, for historical reasons, the use of these aspects in the resource may differ from what might be expected by a newcomer to the discipline. Using the results of our analysis we then created an online questionnaire to probe what is discerned (Eriksson, Linder, Airey, & Redfors, in press) with respect to each of these aspects by astronomers and physicists ranging from first year undergraduates to university professors.

    Our findings suggest that some of the issues we highlight in our analysis may, in fact, be contributors to the alternative conceptions of undergraduate students and we therefore propose that lecturers pay particular attention to the disambiguation of these features for their students.

  • 15.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Reski, Nico
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Tyrkkö, Jukka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Visualizing dynamic text corpora using Virtual Reality2018In: ICAME 39 Book of Abstracts: Corpus Linguistics and Changing Society, International Computer Archive of Modern and Medieval English (ICAME) , 2018, p. 205-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, data visualization has become a major area in Digital Humanities research, and the same holds true also in linguistics. The rapidly increasing size of corpora, the emergence of dynamic real-time streams, and the availability of complex and enriched metadata have made it increasingly important to facilitate new and innovative approaches to presenting and exploring primary data. This demonstration showcases the uses of Virtual Reality (VR) in the visualization of geospatial linguistic data using data from the Nordic Tweet Stream (NTS) project (see Laitinen et al 2017). The NTS data for this demonstration comprises a full year of geotagged tweets (12,443,696 tweets from 273,648 user accounts) posted within the Nordic region (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden). The dataset includes over 50 metadata parameters in addition to the tweets themselves.

    We demonstrate the potential of using VR to efficiently find meaningful patterns in vast streams of data. The VR environment allows an easy overview of any of the features (textual or metadata) in a text corpus. Our focus will be on the language identification data, which provides a previously unexplored perspective into the use of English and other non-indigenous languages in the Nordic countries alongside the native languages of the region.

    Our VR prototype utilizes the HTC Vive headset for a room-scale VR scenario, and it is being developed using the Unity3D game development engine. Each node in the VR space is displayed as a stacked cuboid, the equivalent of a bar chart in a three-dimensional space, summarizing all tweets at one geographic location for a given point in time (see: https://tinyurl.com/nts-vr). Each stacked cuboid represents information of the three most frequently used languages, appropriately color coded, enabling the user to get an overview of the language distribution at each location. The VR prototype further encourages users to move between different locations and inspect points of interest in more detail (overall location-related information, a detailed list of all languages detected, the most frequently used hashtags). An underlying map outlines country borders and facilitates orientation. In addition to spatial movement through the Nordic areas, the VR system provides an interface to explore the Twitter data based on time (days, weeks, months, or time of predefined special events), which enables users to explore data over time (see: https://tinyurl.com/nts-vr-time).

    In addition to demonstrating how the VR methods aid data visualization and exploration, we will also briefly discuss the pedagogical implications of using VR to showcase linguistic diversity.

  • 16.
    Alklid, Jonathan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Twitch, a Breath of Fresh Air?: An Analysis of Sexism on Twitch.tv2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of sexism is arguably an important topic in modern society in several aspects of life. With the introduction of the Internet and communication over the Internet, additional potential sources of sexism have emerged. While there appears to have been a significant number of studies regarding sexism in cyberspace, Twitch.tv is a relatively new platform and seems yet to be properly explored. Therefore, while being limited in size, the present study aims to provide an introduction to Twitch.tv by performing a limited investigation of the extent of sexist behaviour and ideas expressed by users on the site, particularly against female streamers. To accomplish this, 30,000 lines of chat messages from six different chatrooms, three belonging to women and the remaining three to men, were examined for sexist behaviour, based on a variety of parameters such as differences in language complexity and instances of sexist remarks. The results suggested that several varieties of sexism existed on Twitch, and was directed at both men and women, where women seemed to be more heavily affected than men. The conclusion of the study is that Twitch does not seem to be a breath of fresh air in cyberspace as it appears to embody numerous sexist ideas. However, the author notes that Twitch could serve as a potentially useful source of data for future gender studies online.

  • 17.
    Allard, Therese
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    A Visit to the Gentle Island: How to retain the pragmatic functions of a tourist guide in translation2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study discusses how the pragmatic text functions of the Prince Edward Island Visitor’s Guide can be retained in translation from English into Swedish. Katharina Reiss’ model of texttypes and their different functions have been used to identify the functions of the source text, and in order to investigate the possibilities of retaining these functions in the target text, the discussion is tied to text features where the pragmatic text functions are displayed. The translation choices, next, are supported by the translation strategies offered by Rune Ingo and Peter Newmark. The results show that the informative function can be retained by using the translation strategies of addition or explicitation in most cases, whereas the operative function can be retained by copying the sentence structure or the direct address from the source text to the target text. The expressive function, next, can be retained by using Ingo’s strategy of equivalence. However, there are also examples where the expressive function has to be neglected in favor of the informative function.

     

     

  • 18.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Conceptions of Personal Learning Environments Among EFL Teachers at Upper Secondary Level in Sweden2013In: 20 Years of EUROCALL: Learning from thePast, Looking to the Future. Proceedings of the 2013 EUROCALL Conference, Évora, Portugal, 2013, p. 7-13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, virtual learning environments (VLEs) or course management systems (CMSs) have become commonplace in European higher education as well as making inroads into primary and secondary schools. VLEs such as Moodle, Blackboard and It's Learning offer educational institutions standardized packages in the form of a range of administrative, pedagogical and communicative tools. Teachers of English as a foreign language at secondary and tertiary levels are certainly no exceptions to this trend, employing VLEs as learning platforms to support a variety of ITC-based learning activities and tasks. VLEs have however attracted criticism from some quarters in that they may be seen merely as virtual embodiments of the classroom with all the restrictions which the 'physical' classroom has traditionally entailed (Weller 2007). Furthermore it has been argued that VLEs have failed to embrace the full advantages of Web 2.0 technologies or acknowledge trends towards informal learning afforded by social media etc. The response to this criticism has been the envisioning of Personal Learning Environments or PLEs which utilise the plethora of free, often collaborative online resources and tools now available to learners. This paper explores the conceptualisation of PLEs and their advantages / disadvantages vis-à-vis VLEs among upper secondary school teachers of English in Sweden on the basis of pedagogical principles put forward as part of the Open University's SocialLearn and OpenLearn matrices (Conole 2008). It is suggested that the mapping of the core frameworks of thinking and reflection, experience and activity, conversation and interaction and evidence and demonstration to a set of learning principles can provide the basis for the evaluation of PLEs as envisioned by teachers and learners.

  • 19.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Marriages of convenience?: Teachers and coursebooks in the digital age2015In: ELT Journal, ISSN 0951-0893, E-ISSN 1477-4526, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 249-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a survey of Swedish EFL teachers’ attitudes towards,and dependence on, ELT coursebook packages in the light of recent researchinto digital literacy. The results showed that while ICT is making massiveinroads into language classrooms in technologically advantaged countrieslike Sweden, the coursebook package still has its place assured amongtrainee teachers, at least for the immediate future. The current generationof ‘digital native’ pre-service teachers still looks to coursebook packagesto structure lessons during teaching practice and as a means of providingextended reading practice in the L2. Their more experienced in-servicecolleagues are, however, increasingly abandoning the coursebook in favour offreestanding digital resources. Practising teachers in the survey increasinglysaw coursebooks in contingency terms and as a ‘fall-back’ position. Finally,the article considers the desirability of a more fundamental abandonment ofthe coursebook in favour of digital tools and resources in the EFL classroom.

  • 20.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    MOOCs as primers in EFL Teacher Training2017In: The Teacher Trainer Journal, ISSN 0951-7626, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 11-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Reacting to the technology splurge: information and Communications Technology (ICT) Training for EFL teachers in the one-to-one era2015In: The Teacher Trainer Journal, ISSN 0951-7626, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 19-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Social media as an alternative to Moodle in EFL teaching practice forums2015In: Critical CALL – Proceedings of the 2015 EUROCALL Conference, Padova, Italy / [ed] Francesca Helm, Linda Bradley, Marta Guarda, Sylvie Thouësny., Research-publishing.net, 2015, p. 9-15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the preferences among a group of pre-service English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher trainees for social media rather than Moodle, an institutional Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), as a forum for support during a recent five week teaching practice in southern Sweden. The teacher trainees responded to a questionnaire relating to preferences for their own Facebook group as opposed to the Moodle forum set up specifically by the course tutor for the purpose of sharing observations and discussing lesson planning, aspects of reflective practice and resources while on teaching practice. Their reflections shed interesting light on the importance of student EFL teacher ownership and ‘student centricity’ in the learning space. These concepts emerge from a consideration of the learning space at the intersection of pedagogical, technological and content knowledge and the nature of forum discussions when faced with the alternative between social media and institutionalized learning platforms under the direction of teacher trainers and course managers.

  • 23.
    Allen, Christopher
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Berggren, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Digital literacy and sustainability: a field study in EFL teacher development2016In: CALL communities and culture: short papers from EUROCALL 2016 / [ed] Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous, Linda Bradley, Sylvie Thouësny, 2016, p. 14-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This project introduces the concept of digital literacy at a practical level to a group of EFL teachers within the context of a single work place; a technologically well-resourced upper secondary school in Sweden. English teachers were provided with a theoretical and practical overview of the digital literacy concept as described by Dudeney, Hockly, and Pegrum (2013) before being given the task of each teaching a lesson. The teachers’ reflective experiences of incorporating digital literacy into advanced level English teaching were then evaluated through a focus group interview. The results obtained show the efficacy of incorporating small scale exploratory practice research projects alongside busy teaching schedules and administrative demands as well as developing teachers’ perspectives on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom. In addition, the project has promoted synergies and collaboration among a school staff engaged in the long-term goal of continued professional development.

  • 24.
    Allen, Christopher
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Hadjistassou, Stella K.
    KIOS Research Center for Intelligent Systems and Networks, Cyprus.
    Richardson, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Self-evaluation using iPads in EFL teaching practice2016In: CALL communities and culture: short papers from EUROCALL 2016 / [ed] Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous, Linda Bradley, Sylvie Thouësny, 2016, p. 20-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relentlessly accelerating global educational demands for teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) in multiple, diverse, and often remote geographic locations constitute new challenges for academic institutions, teacher training and preparation programs, and teachers themselves. This study describes a novel approach where five elementary school preservice teachers teaching ESL/EFL borrowed an iPad mini from their teacher training institution customized with specific apps to record a series of five teaching sequences during their teaching practice placement in elementary schools in Tanzania and Kenya. All recorded sessions were uploaded to a Moodle Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)site specially constructed for the purpose of the teaching practice course. Results indicate that, apart from their experienced instructors’ feedback on their teaching practice, the recorded sessions formed constructive tools for self-reflection, self-evaluation and the pursuit of possible paths for improvement.

  • 25.
    Almqvist, Simon Adam
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    An Englishman in Paris: A Study of Katherine Mansfield's Construction of Englishness in Je Ne Parle Pas Français2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The author discusses the construction of Englishness in Katherine Mansfield’s short story Je Ne Parle Pas Français using previous accounts for Englishness, Otherness and the context of modernism –primarily featuring imperialism. The author concludes that there is an English identity portrayed in Je Ne Parle Pas Français, but that it is to a greater extent associated with imperialism than other identifiable cultural traits.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Antonia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Teaching English to newly arrived immigrant pupils: A qualitative case study about teachers' experiences at a Swedish secondary school2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative case study examines teachers’ perspectives on receiving and teaching newly arrived immigrant pupils. Previous research and the Swedish National Agency for Education have shown that immigrant pupils have a tendency to fail their education, and some researchers also implied that these children fail their English education. The aim of this essay has been to investigate how English teachers at a secondary school in southern Sweden deal with the growing number of newly arrived immigrants in their classes. The collected data is based on qualitative semi-structured interviews with three teachers at a secondary school in Sweden. The results indicate that the teachers considered that it was challenging to receive and teach newly arrived immigrant pupils. They do not have enough information on how they should incorporate these children into subject planning and ongoing pedagogical initiatives. Moreover, the data also show that the participants expressed the fact that the pupils often had a low level of English proficiency, and that they occasionally did not obtain a grade in English. The pupils’ low English level connected with their ongoing Swedish acquisition made it difficult for the teachers to adapt their teaching. The Results also implied that many newly arrived pupils used English as a communication language, which may have a positive impact on their learning. 

  • 27.
    Andersson Edén, Therese
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Shakespearean Stahr: Using Genette’s Theory of Intertextuality to Compare The Last Tycoon to Shakespeare’s Tragedies2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay uses Gerard Genette’s theory of intertextuality – in particular, architextuality - in order to establish the connection between Shakespearean tragedies and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s last novel, The Last Tycoon. The essay relies mainly on known Shakespeare critic A.C Bradley and the categories he uses in order to establish what makes a Shakespearean tragedy a Shakespearean tragedy. This framework will then be used to further elaborate upon the architextual connection between Shakespeare and Fitzgerald. The essay also compares the characters from The Last Tycoon directly to characters from Shakespeare’s tragedies in order to further show the intertextual connections. For example, Fitzgerald's main character Monroe Stahr is compared to Julius Caesar, from Shakespeare's play of the same name, while the antagonist Mr Brady is compared to both Cassius from the previously mentioned Julius Caesar, as well as Iago from Othello

  • 28.
    Andersson, Emelie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Eine Untersuchung über Schreibprozesse und Schreibkonferenzen in Deutsch als Fremdsprache2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines if and how the use of writing process and peer review can be beneficial to the text quality when writing a short essay in a foreign language. The study focuses on a group of Swedish high school students, 17 and 18 years of age, studying their second foreign language, German, with no prior experience of working with peer review in any subject. To investigate the efficiency of the use of writing process and peer review, four research questions were formulated:

     

    1   To what extent does peer review lead to an improvement of the text quality?

         a)  What comments to the texts do the students give during the group discussion?

         b)  What do the students change in their own text after the group discussion?

         c)  What are the students’ attitudes toward the work with peer review?

     

    In order to understand how the students worked with the comments and how it affected the text quality, the conversations were compared with the actual changes made between the two text versions. The comments were mostly very polite. Even when the students criticized, they tried to give feedback very gently. All texts were improved after the peer review, although most of the errors from the first draft were still present in the second version. After the writing of the second draft, the students took a survey, where they were able to express their views on various aspects of the project. The students were mostly positive to this way of working with texts, although some of them found that they did not know enough German yet. Nevertheless, most of them wanted to try it again, to see their own progress.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Melissa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    La pluriculturalidad en las clases de español como lengua extranjera: competencia sociocultural2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For people in Sweden one of the favourites places to go on vacation is Spain. It is warm, inexpensive and they like Spanish culture, this helps explain why the Spanish language is so popular in schools in Sweden.

    To learn a foreign language means more than learning how to speak and writing, it also means learning about the culture of that language because the culture is intrinsically related to the language. Additionally, is very significant as teacher to give your students the knowledge of sociocultural of Spanish speaking countries, the knowledge of the world and in this way create multicultural students.

    For this reason, we decided to do a quantitative research about what sociocultural topics are thought in the classroom in Lulea (Sweden) and how teachers are developing multiculturalism in their students.

    As result of our work we can mention that teachers include sociocultural topics in their classes but there are certain sociocultural subjects that are not taught, we could also confirm that the textbook has many gaps in sociocultural subjects.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Victor
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    On The Semantic Variation of the Lexeme Bear: A corpus study of its nominal and verbal uses2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The focus of this corpus study was to present how the lexeme bear is used both verbally and nominally by analyzing its collocates and thereby describe its semantic variation. The examples presented in the study are bear (stock market dealer); bear market (the stock market in decline) and bear in mind (to keep in remembrance). The method used regarding the observation of the semantic variation of the lexeme bear, was by looking at the frequency rate and the concordance lines of the nominal and the verbal uses through COHA (Corpus of Historical American English) and COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English). The study showed that the frequency of the metaphorical meanings in both senses, deduced by the concordance lines, far outweigh the frequency of its prototypical meaning, which according to the OED (Oxford English Dictionary) is Ursus Carnivore (the animal). A possible process leading up to the metaphorical meaning, as in the case of bear market, is presented in order to conceptualize its function and put it into a social perspective. In conclusion, the cultural perceptions of the Ursus Carnivore led to certain specific cultural associations starting from bear (stock exchange dealer), and leading up to the creation of the compound bear market, having a specific metaphorical meaning within financial jargon. The cultural preference in American English speech regarding its verbal uses were apparent when comparing the expression bear in mind to the rather synonymous and equally metaphorical expression keep in mind, which could eventually replace the expression as suggested by the data. 

  • 31.
    Annani, Stella
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Traduire sans trop trahir.: Traduire un texte théorique sur la traduction avec la cohésion principale comme stratégie principale de traduction.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Translating without betraying. Translating a theoretical text about translation, using the strengthening of cohesive links as the principal strategy of translation.

     

    The aim of this study was to examine some aspects of the translation of a theoretical text on translation, written in French. In order to do that I started off by translating a passage of the book Introduction à la traductologie. Penser la traduction: hier, aujourd’hui, demain by Mathieu Guidère (2010). The book is intended for students and others interested in translation and translation studies.

    The theoretical framework of this study makes references to, among others, Blum-Kulka (1986) and to Vermeer (2012) and the skopos theory.

    As Guidère has a pedagogical aim with his book, it is particularly relevant to pay a special attention to the function of the text while translating. In several cases the source text proved to be both ambiguous and unclear. The skopos theory claims that the function of the target text should be at the center of the translator’s interest. The fact that the translation process requires an interpretation by the translator in the mediation of the message to be transmitted brings, according to Blum-Kulka (1986), about a text that is more redundant than the source text. This redundancy results in a higher level of cohesive explicitness that strengthens the textual cohesion. For this, Blum-Kulka (ibid) suggests that explicitness and greater cohesion can be seen as forming a general strategy in translation.

    To achieve a greater level of cohesion in the target text and to make it easier to read, I used some translation procedures, namely explicitness, simplification, reference and lexical cohesion (cf. Blum-Kulka 1986, Mauranen & Kujamäki 2004 and Halliday & Hassan 1976). I hope to have shown that these procedures were appropriate for the translation of this source text but also for the function of the target text. At the same time it turned out that these categories were in no way waterproof – on the contrary – many times they actually overlapped. I also found passages where textual coherence could not be achieved through translation strategies. In those cases, the translator faces the choice of either transmitting the inconsistency of the source text by translating them, or leaving the field of translation and rewriting the text. I opted for staying in the field of translation.

    The analysis of my own translation is of course a translation commentary rather than a scientific research. To really conduct a thorough research on translation procedures related to the function of the target text, you would have to analyze texts from other translators in order to have a more objective study object.

     

  • 32.
    Antoni, Caroline
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Terminologie de l’architecture provençale et son équivalent suédois2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the translation process the text moves from the home environment it was created for to a completely different culture. In many cases it may be necessary to help the new reader to understand certain culture-related concepts, if they are not widely known in the target culture. The reader of the target text may deviate regarding his cultural affiliation from the source text audience so much that the differences must be taken into consideration in the translation. This is made through various translation strategies, which create adjustments in the content.

       The aim of this essay is to make a comparative analysis on Swedish translation of a French architectural text. We focus on what types of translation strategies we have to apply in the transmission of architectural terms in the source text to the target text and on the frequency of different strategies. We are interested in discovering whether a particular strategy is more common than another in this cultural translation and the result of this quantitative difference will be discussed and motivated to finally be presented at the end of the study. As an introduction to the essay, we describe the process of cultural translation and its difficulties.

       After completing the comparative analysis, we realize that although some cultural words exist in the target culture, they do not always have the same significance in France and Sweden. This means that their cultural implications differ from each other.

  • 33.
    Asklöv, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Bäm! Das nächste Big Thing: Verfahren bei der Übersetzung von Anglizismen in deutschen Digitalunternehmens- und Netzkulturtexten2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay examines anglicisms from a translation perspective. The material consists of two German articles on Internet business and social media and their respective translations into Swedish. The overall aim is to examine different methods and strategies for deciding whether to substitute a particular anglicism by an equivalent Swedish word or whether to transfer it into the Swedish target text. The chosen method for investigating the occurrence of, and attitudes towards, particular anglicisms in Swedish was parallel text comparison and interviews. Following Göran Inghult’s theories on transference types, as well as examining the structural and cultural obstacles to adopting anglicisms into Swedish, the material is analysed from a linguistic and cultural point of view.

    The essay shows that Swedish texts show less evident anglicisms than the German ones. Cultural obstacles, such as attitudes towards anglicisms, and linguistic obstacles, such as the Swedish suffixation of nouns in the definite form, are central to the assumption that translators should pay special attention to anglicisms when translating from German to Swedish.

  • 34.
    Asp, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Comment traduire les références culturelles ?: Les problèmes de traduction des références culturelles dans un texte touristique2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

     

     

     

    Keywords :

    Translation, translation strategies, tourist text, cultural references, Svane

  • 35.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Gordon, Moragh
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Fairman, Tony
    An Electronic Corpus of Letters of Artisans and the Labouring Poor (England, c. 1750‐1835): Compilation Principles and Coding Conventions2014In: RECENT ADVANCES IN CORPUS LINGUISTICS: DEVELOPING AND EXPLOITING CORPORA / [ed] Vandelanotte, L; Davidse, K; Gentens, C; Kimps, D, Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2014, p. 9-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a collaborative project that focuses on letters of artisans and the labouring poor in England, c. 1750-1835 (LALP). The project's objective is to create a corpus that allows for new research perspectives regarding the diachronic development of the English language by adding data representing language of the lower classes. An opportunity for an insight into the language use of the labouring poor has been provided by the laws for poor relief which permitted people in need to apply for out-relief from parish funds during the period 1795-1834. For the last 18 years, the independent scholar Tony Fairman has collected and transcribed more than 2000 poor relief application letters and other letters by artisans and the labouring poor. In this project Fairman's letter collection is being converted into an electronic corpus. Apart from converting the material into electronic form, the transcribed texts will be supplemented with contextual information and manuscript images. This paper presents the letter material, it describes the conversion of the letter collection into a corpus and discusses some of the problems and challenges in the conversion process.(1)

  • 36.
    Avery, Helen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Said, Salam
    Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Tunis.
    Higher Education as a Socio-economic Advancement Opportunity for Refugees2017In: 33. Deutscher Orientalistentag "Asia, Africa and Europe" 18 – 22 september 2017, Jena, Tyskland, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper addresses the relationships between higher education policies for refugees and the wider issues of social justice, transition to sustainability, peacebuilding and post-conflict recovery in the Middle East. The paper draws on an overview of current options for refugees to access higher education, as well as research on long term impacts in post conflict contexts. Perspectives adopted in the paper involve theorizing the ways higher education shapes socio-technical systems in the Middle East, and the effects this can have for economic recovery and autonomy. Today, the world is facing the greatest refugee and displacement crisis since the Second World War. The immediate causes of the crisis seem to be armed conflicts and radicalisation of societies. At closer inspection, we can see that this crisis reflects a repeated failure of the international economic and political system in addressing certain major challenges, including social justice and adequate education. While international politics has failed to support stability or prevent political conflicts, growing neoliberalism and ineffective development strategies have instead contributed to social injustice and economic instability at national and international levels. Higher education plays a key role in stabilisation, modernization and de-radicalisation of societies, but has to date only received limited attention in development assistance strategies or in the context of humanitarian aid for refugees. Young refugees and displaced academics are therefore insufficiently equipped to work as catalysts for peacebuilding in their own or host countries. Moreover, they are under severe economic and social pressure to earn money for their family’s survival. Given these circumstances, opening up opportunities for higher education for young refugees (O'Keeffe and Pásztor 2017) not only give them the hope to improve their socioeconomic situation, but will also change their personal status as a “refugee”. Crucially, a well-educated generation is a fundamental condition for successful reconstruction, social recovery and sustainable development in the post conflict future (Emtairah et al. 2016). Attention must be devoted to the form and content of higher education, however, to address challenges, create capacity needed in recovery efforts, and avoid future dependencies (cf. Dryden-Peterson 2016).

  • 37.
    Axelsson, Clara
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Byrman, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Skoglund, Astrid
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    "Det kan bli så mycket fel": Förstudie om barnmorskors upplevelser av kommunikation med gravida kvinnor utan funktionell behärskning av svenska.2016Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Axelsson, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Translating Hedges: A Study of the Translation of Hedges from English to Swedish in an Academic Text2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 39.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Erickson, Gudrun
    University of Gothenburg.
    Granfeldt, Jonas
    Lund University.
    Rosén, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Offering research education for in-service language teachers2017In: Language Teaching, ISSN 0261-4448, E-ISSN 1475-3049, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 290-293Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2008, the Swedish government has launched occasional offers of funding for graduate schools aimed at practising teachers. The fundamental purpose of this initiative is to enhance quality in the Swedish school system by implementing what is stated in the Education Act, namely that education at all levels should be based upon scientific knowledge and evidence-based experience.

  • 40.
    Beillon, Linn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Challenge to Learn English as an L2 when Having Dyslexia: A study about Dyslexic Pupils’ English Language learning from Special Needs Teachers’ Perspectives2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate how special needs teachers work with dyslexic pupils who are not reaching the goals of the subject of English. In addition, the focus is to examine dyslexic pupils’ experienced areas of difficulties and also how to structure the language teachings in order to facilitate for the pupils with dyslexia. The method of collecting data for this essay is based on a qualitative research approach through semi-structured interviews with special needs teachers. The results conclude that the informants do not support the pupils directly since their assignment is instead to coach the teachers, which mean that their main responsibility is to work primarily with school organization. Also, through this essay it became evident that dyslexia exists in every language and the specific learning disability is not equal with a failed grade in English. 

  • 41.
    Beillon, Linn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Challenge to Learn English as an L2 when Having Dyslexia: A study about Dyslexic Pupils’ English Language learning from Special Needs Teachers’ Perspectives2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate how special needs teachers work with dyslexic pupils who are not reaching the goals of the subject of English. In addition, the focus is to examine dyslexic pupils’ experienced areas of difficulties and also how to structure the language teachings in order to facilitate for the pupils with dyslexia. The method of collecting data for this essay is based on a qualitative research approach through semi-structured interviews with special needs teachers. The results conclude that the informants do not support the pupils directly since their assignment is instead to coach the teachers, which mean that their main responsibility is to work primarily with school organization. Also, through this essay it became evident that dyslexia exists in every language and the specific learning disability is not equal with a failed grade in English. 

  • 42.
    Bengtsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Gender equality in the subject of English in Swedish schools2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The National Agency for Education (Skolverket) and The Swedish National Curriculum have stated that equality between female and male students is important. The present study investigates students in the subject English in Swedish upper secondary school and municipal school for adult education from the perspective of gender dominance in English conversation with a teacher present, with the focus on turn-taking. Two separate observations were made in three classes in adult education and two classes in upper secondary school. The research questions of this investigation are; which gender dominates the on-going conversation in English with a teacher present, how the turns were allocated, given or taken, and if the gender patterns differ between a municipal school for adults and an upper secondary school. The potential impact of the teacher’s sex on the patterns of domination is also taken into consideration. Female dominance as well as male dominance is revealed in the result of the investigated classes’ gender patterns. The results also reveal that the teacher’s sex could have an impact on the patterns of domination.

  • 43.
    Bengtsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Gender equality in the subject of English in Swedish schools: A synchronic investigation of gender differences based on classroom observations2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The National Agency for Education (Skolverket) and The Swedish National Curriculum stated that equality between female and male students is important. The present study investigates students in the subject English in Swedish upper secondary school and municipal school for adult education from the perspective of gender dominance in English conversation with a teacher present, with the focus on turn-taking. Two separate observations were made in three classes in adult education and two classes in upper secondary school. The research questions of this investigation are; which gender dominates the on-going conversation in English with a teacher present, how the turns were allocated, given or taken, and if the gender patterns differ between a municipal school for adults and an upper secondary school. The potential impact of the teacher's sex on the patterns of domination is also taken into consideration. Female dominance as well as male dominance is revealed in the result of the investigated classes' gender patterns. The results also reveal that the teacher's sex could have an impact on the patterns of domination.

  • 44.
    Bergdahl, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Reading on Equal Terms?: A Comparative Study of the Importance of SocialBackground and Cultural Capital in Vocational vs. University-preparatoryEnglish Training2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This degree project has three aims. First, it will investigate students’ attitudes towards reading novels in English and how their motivation for reading differs whether they attend vocational or university-preparatory programs.  In order to investigate this, a total of 73 students were asked to participate in the implementation of a questionnaire.

    Second, this degree project sets out to study if there are differences in how four teachers approach reading novels in English and third, it will study how these four teachers motivate their students in their studies. This part of the investigation was conducted by performing qualitative interviews with each of the teacher informants.

    The theoretical framework of this degree project has its basis in the theories regarding cultural capital by sociologist Pierre Bourdieu.

    The results show that there are clear divisive lines between the attitudes and the motivation of students depending on which program they attend and that these divisions can be attributed in part to students’ social background. The results also indicate that teachers are aware of these differences and approach reading novels in the classroom accordingly.

  • 45.
    Berggren, Ebba
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Harry Potter and the Battle against Racism in EFL classrooms: A study of how racism is portrayed in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets - novel and movie, with a CRT perspective in pedagogical settings.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay’s aim is to investigate how Rowling uses her novel Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets to criticize racism in her magical world and ours. A secondary aim concerns how Rowling’s critical stance creates ways to resist racism for readers in the EFL classroom. Therefore, a comparison from a Critical Race Theory (CRT) perspective is made with focus on certain sequence comparisons between the novel and the film. Teachers need to highlight problems like racism in classrooms and fantasy novels and movies are exceptional tools to raise awareness and teach critical thinking to students. 

  • 46.
    Berggren, Jacob
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Den extramurala engelskans effekter på ordförrådet: En jämförande studie mellan elever i årskurs 52018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between extramural English and levels of English vocabulary as defined by the CEFR framework and word frequency among pupils at year 5 in a Swedish primary school. 25 pupils from two different classes participated in the study. Pupils were divided into two groups based on their usage of and exposure to English in their spare time, referred to as the high exposure and low exposure groups respectively. The results from this study show a connection between an extensive exposure to extramural English and the development of a more advanced vocabulary of English words as defined by the English Vocabulary Profile scale, in turn based on the CEFR levels A1-C2 and corpus-based word frequency derivations. One interesting aspect that came up was that while both of the groups were using almost the same level of low frequency words, the high extramural English group used more difficult, higher level words. A conclusion is that the most common extramural activity amongst these pupils, that of playing computer games, might explain this group's acquisition of higher level, more specialized vocabulary items in comparison with the other group which encountered extramural English less often.

  • 47.
    Berggren, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The assessment of digital project in the EFL classroom2017In: CALL in a climate of change: adapting to turbulent global conditions, short papers from EUROCALL 2017 / [ed] Kate Borthwick, Linda Bradley, Sylvie Thouësny, Voillans France: Research-publishing.net, 2017, p. 46-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a project aiming at describing professionalpractice in the assessment of collaborative digital projects among a group of inserviceEnglish as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers within the context of asingle workplace, a technologically well-resourced upper secondary school inSweden. In a previous project (Allen & Berggren, 2016), teachers were providedwith an overview of the digital literacy concept as described by Dudeney,Hockly, and Pegrum (2013) as part of an initiative to better integrate informationcommunication technology into their classroom practice. The current studyaddresses the need expressed in previous projects for developing assessmentpractices among the teachers working with digital projects, making use of apractical overview of the assessment of digital projects (Dudeney et al., 2013)trying out an assignment. Afterwards, a focus group interview was conductedfocusing on teachers' experiences of digital project assessment. The resultsindicate that while the teaching and assessment of collaborative digital projectsare not aligned, the teaching of digital literacy making use of digital resource mayaugment ‘traditional’ assessment. Following this conclusion, a necessity of furthercollaboration among EFL teachers appears, aiming at developing the assessmentof the collaborative aspect of digital projects.

  • 48.
    Bergman, Angelica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Happily Ever After: A Linguistic Study of the Portrayals of the Female Characters in One Old and One New Disney Film2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to answer the following research questions: which stereotypical linguistic profile characteristics and/or typical linguistic profile characteristics, if any, can be found in the old film and the new film respectively? Does the time difference between the films seem to have affected the female characters’ language use, if so in what way? Works by Lakoff (2004), Coates (2004) and Holmes (2013) are used to create a profile for stereotypical female speech and a profile for typical female speech. These profiles are applied to the transcripts of two Disney Princess films; one old film representing the classical Disney Princess films, and one new film representing the modern Disney Princess films. In order to suit this study all non-conversational utterances such as singing, and non-human utterances, are removed from the transcripts. The features are counted and then converted to frequencies of 1 feature per 100 words, in order to account for the differences in amount of words uttered. The results show that stereotypical features as well as typical features are present in both films. However, the old film contains more stereotypical features than typical features, and the new film contains more typical features than stereotypical features. Therefore, it would appear that the old film presents a more stereotypical image of women than the new film. Furthermore, the results indicate that power relations, and not just gender differences, play an important role in both films. The importance of these power relations would benefit from further investigation in future studies.

  • 49.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Linnaeus University.
    Divided by a common language: A comparative study of preferences for, and use of, American and British English vocabulary among students in Swedish upper secondary and tertiary education2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative study aims to discover and demonstrate the potential division in preferences for, and use of, AmE and BrE vocabulary by examining the possible influence of variety shift, motivation, gender, and language contact among 181 EFL students in one upper secondary school and one university in Sweden. Accordingly, the material, a questionnaire, was distributed to probe the preferences and potential inclination factors through solicitation of background information and personal attitudes towards English. Additionally, through a selection process within the questionnaire, to determine the division in actual variety use, the respondents chose between 30 variety-dependent synonyms randomly divided into two separate columns. The results demonstrate a self-reported preference for AmE among upper secondary students, which seems to derive from its high frequency of use, and a preference for BrE among students in tertiary education, due to the more appealing sound of pronunciation and the status which it is believed to signal. Additionally, intrinsic motivation is shown to be more frequent among students who prefer BrE. The differences in variety use are, despite some minor connection to variety shift, essentially identical regardless of variety preference, motivation, EFL level and student gender, with AmE being used most frequently. However, none of the respondents used exclusively one variety without alternating between the two in at least one instance, but the extent of inclination seemed to depend on the variety with which one had had the longest contact.

  • 50.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Linnaeus University.
    Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety in the Swedish School Context: A Comparative Study of Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety and EFL course levels at Swedish Upper Secondary School2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative study aims to discover and demonstrate the potential relationship between foreign language speaking anxiety and course level among 183 students from three consecutive courses of English as a foreign language, i.e. English 5, 6, and 7, at three upper secondary schools in the South of Sweden. Accordingly, a survey was distributed in order to account for demographic information about the students, such as course level, age, and sex, to determine the students’ oral proficiency levels, and to assess the students’ anxiety levels in relation to 33 anxiety-provoking classroom situations. The results showed that Swedish upper secondary students are not particularly anxious regardless of course level, save that the students in English 5 would feel less comfortable around native speakers of English, although not to an extent which would indicate anxiety, and that the students in English 7 would, in contrast to the other course levels, experience high levels of anxiety when volunteering answers and being called on in class. However, the most notable differences were found between the genders and between the students with high and low oral proficiency levels. Female students generally showed higher levels of anxiety than male students did. Yet, in most cases, the difference did not suggest that one of the genders was anxious while the other one was not. In terms of oral proficiency levels, the students with low oral proficiency showed higher levels of anxiety, often to the extent that they would be anxious while the ones with high proficiency would not. Thus, the levels of anxiety seem to depend on gender and oral proficiency more than the students’ course levels.

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