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  • 1.
    Lindberg, Frida W.
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Norrby, Marlene
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rahman, Mohammad A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Salhotra, Aseem
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Takatsuki, Hideyo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Jeppesen, Soren
    Lund University.
    Linke, Heiner
    Lund University.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Controlled Surface Silanization for Actin-Myosin and Biocompatibility of New Polymer Resists2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 30, p. 8777-8784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular motor-based nanodevices require organized cytoskeletal filament guiding along motility-promoting tracks, confined by motility-inhibiting walls. One way to enhance motility quality on the tracks, particularly in terms of filament velocity but also the fraction of motile filaments, is to optimize the surface hydrophobicity. We have investigated the potential to achieve this for the actin myosin II motor system on trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS)-derivatized SiO2 surfaces to be used as channel floors in nanodevices. We have also investigated the ability to supress motility on two new polymer resists, TU7 (for nanoimprint lithography) and CSAR 62 (for electron beam and deep UV lithography), to be used as channel walls. We developed a chemical-vapor deposition tool for silanizing SiO2 surfaces in a controlled environment to achieve different surface hydrophobicities (measured by water contact angle). In contrast to previous work, we were able to fabricate a wide range of contact angles by varying the silanization time and chamber pressure using only one type of silane. This resulted in a significant improvement of the silanization procedure, producing a predictable contact angle on the surface and thereby predictable quality of the heavy meromyosin (HMM)-driven actin motility with regard to velocity. We observed a high degree of correlation between the filament sliding velocity and contact angle in the range 10-86 degrees, expanding the previously studied range. We found that the sliding velocity on TU7 surfaces was superior to that on CSAR 62 surfaces despite similar contact angles. In addition, we were able to suppress the motility on both TU7 and CSAR 62 by plasma oxygen treatment before silanization. These results are discussed in relation to previously proposed surface adsorption mechanisms of HMM and their relationship to the water contact angle. Additionally, the results are considered for the development of actin-myosin based nanodevices with superior performance with respect to actin-myosin functionality.

  • 2.
    Verardo, Damiano
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lindberg, Frida W.
    Lund University.
    Anttu, Nicklas
    Lund University;AstraZeneca R&D Gothenburg.
    Niman, Cassandra S.
    Lund University;Univ Calif San Diego, USA.
    Lard, Mercy
    Lund University.
    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.
    Lund University;Aalto Univ, Finland.
    Nylander, Tommy
    Lund University.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Lund University.
    Prinz, Christelle N.
    Lund University.
    Linke, Heiner
    Lund University.
    Nanowires for Biosensing: Lightguiding of Fluorescence as a Function of Diameter and Wavelength2018In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 4796-4802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconductor nanowires can act as nanoscaled optical fibers, enabling them to guide and concentrate light emitted by surface-bound fluorophores, potentially enhancing the sensitivity of optical biosensing. While parameters such as the nanowire geometry and the fluorophore wavelength can be expected to strongly influence this lightguiding effect, no detailed description of their effect on in-coupling of fluorescent emission is available to date. Here, we use confocal imaging to quantify the lightguiding effect in GaP nanowires as a function of nanowire geometry and light wavelength. Using a combination of finite-difference time-domain simulations and analytical approaches, we identify the role of multiple waveguide modes for the observed lightguiding. The normalized frequency parameter, based on the step-index approximation, predicts the lightguiding ability of the nanowires as a function of diameter and fluorophore wavelength, providing a useful guide for the design of optical biosensors based on nanowires.

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