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  • 1.
    Prause, Vanessa
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Fictional characters as metaphors for leaders' learning ability concerning change and transformation: A comparison of students' perception2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout past centuries, leadership developed to a topic of paramount importance considered not only individually, but also in interrelation with other concepts such as learning, change, and/or transformation. Because of this, it appears reasonable to further elaborate on this pivotal issue. Since the usage of fiction has been identified by researchers as an educational tool of great value, the aim of this research is to elaborate the illustration of these three concepts in their reciprocity within fiction. A main focus was placed on occurring disparities amongst the perceptions of students with a different educational background. In order to analysis these aspects, both secondary data sources and empirical data from focus group sessions were used. Three key findings were acquired:

    1) Universally valid interpretations of the concepts seem to be lacking.

    2) Characters within novels and movies were designated by participants as useful metaphors for a leader’s learning ability regarding change and transformation. Particular areas were further specified as learning opportunities.

    3) Similarities, as well as disparities were apparent among the responses from students with different fields of study. As a probable reason for conformities, the value of fiction as a superior educational tool was indicated. In contrast, distinguishable frames of reference were a reasonable cause for discrepancies among the responses. 

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