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  • 1.
    Cerro-Galvez, Elena
    et al.
    CSIC, IDAEA, Spain.
    Casal, Paulo
    CSIC, IDAEA, Spain.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pina, Benjamin
    CSIC, IDAEA, Spain.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Dachs, Jordi
    CSIC, IDAEA, Spain.
    Vila-Costa, Maria
    CSIC, IDAEA, Spain.
    Microbial responses to anthropogenic dissolved organic carbon in the Arctic and Antarctic coastal seawaters2019In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 1466-1481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thousands of semi-volatile hydrophobic organic pollutants (OPs) reach open oceans through atmospheric deposition, causing a chronic and ubiquitous pollution by anthropogenic dissolved organic carbon (ADOC). Hydrophobic ADOC accumulates in cellular lipids, inducing harmful effects on marine biota, and can be partially prone to microbial degradation. Unfortunately, their possible effects on microorganisms, key drivers of global biogeochemical cycles, remain unknown. We challenged coastal microbial communities from Ny-angstrom lesund (Arctic) and Livingston Island (Antarctica) with ADOC concentrations within the range of oceanic concentrations in 24 h. ADOC addition elicited clear transcriptional responses in multiple microbial heterotrophic metabolisms in ubiquitous groups such as Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and SAR11. Importantly, a suite of cellular adaptations and detoxifying mechanisms, including remodelling of membrane lipids and transporters, was detected. ADOC exposure also changed the composition of microbial communities, through stimulation of rare biosphere taxa. Many of these taxa belong to recognized OPs degraders. This work shows that ADOC at environmentally relevant concentrations substantially influences marine microbial communities. Given that emissions of organic pollutants are growing during the Anthropocene, the results shown here suggest an increasing influence of ADOC on the structure of microbial communities and the biogeochemical cycles regulated by marine microbes.

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