lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Blom, Kerstin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tillgren, Hanna Tarkian
    Linköping University.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Dept PaLinköping University.
    Danlycke, Ewa
    Linköping University.
    Forssen, Mattias
    Linköping University.
    Söderström, Alexandra
    Linköping University.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University.
    Jernelov, Susanna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Karolinska Institutet;Linköping University.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Internet-vs. group-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial2015In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 70, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare guided Internet-delivered to group-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. We conducted an 8-week randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with 6-months follow-up. Participants were forty-eight adults with insomnia, recruited via media. Interventions were guided Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) and group-delivered CBT (GCBT) for insomnia. Primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), secondary outcome measures were sleep diary data, depressive symptoms, response- and remission rates. Both treatment groups showed significant improvements and large effect sizes for ISI (Within Cohen's d: ICBT post = 1.8, 6-months follow-up = 2.1; GCBT post = 2.1, 6-months follow-up = 2.2). Confidence interval of the difference between groups posttreatment and at FU6 indicated non-inferiority of ICBT compared to GCBT. At post-treatment, two thirds of patients in both groups were considered responders (ISI-reduction > 7p). Using diagnostic criteria, 63% (ICBT) and 75% (GCBT) were in remission. Sleep diary data showed moderate to large effect sizes. We conclude that both guided Internet-CBT and group-CBT in this study were efficacious with regard to insomnia severity, sleep parameters and depressive symptoms. The results are in line with previous research, and strengthen the evidence for guided Internet-CBT for insomnia. Trial registration: The study protocol was approved by, and registered with, the regional ethics review board in Linkoping, Sweden, registration number 2010/385-31. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 2.
    Bothelius, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Jernelov, Susanna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University.
    McCracken, Lance M.
    Kings Coll London, UK.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Measuring Acceptance of Sleep Difficulties: The Development of the Sleep Problem Acceptance Questionnaire2015In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1815-1822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objectives: Acceptance may be an important therapeutic process in sleep medicine, but valid psychometric instruments measuring acceptance related to sleep difficulties are lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of acceptance in insomnia, and to examine its factor structure as well as construct validity. Design: In a cross-sectional design, a principal component analysis for item reduction was conducted on a first sample (A) and a confirmatory factor analysis on a second sample (B). Construct validity was tested on a combined sample (C). Setting: Questionnaire items were derived from a measure of acceptance in chronic pain, and data were gathered through screening or available from pretreatment assessments in four insomnia treatment trials, administered online, via bibliotherapy and in primary care. Participants: Adults with insomnia: 372 in sample A and 215 in sample B. Sample C (n = 820) included sample A and B with another 233 participants added. Measures: Construct validity was assessed through relations with established acceptance and sleep scales. Results: The principal component analysis presented a two-factor solution with eight items, explaining 65.9% of the total variance. The confirmatory factor analysis supported the solution. Acceptance of sleep problems was more closely related to subjective symptoms and consequences of insomnia than to diary description of sleep, or to acceptance of general private events. Conclusions: The Sleep Problem Acceptance Questionnaire (SPAQ), containing the subscales "Activity Engagement" and "Willingness", is a valid tool to assess acceptance of insomnia.

  • 3.
    Forsell, Erik
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Kraepelien, Martin
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Blom, Kerstin
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Isacsson, Nils
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Jernelov, Susanna
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Rosen, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Development of a very brief scale for detecting and measuring panic disorder using two items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report2019In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 257, p. 615-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To minimize the burden in detecting and monitoring Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia by developing a very brief scale with selected items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR), and to investigate the proposed scale's psychometric properties in a comorbid sample. Methods: A sample of 5103 patients from the Internet Psychiatry Clinic in Sweden, diagnosed and treated with Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder (n = 1390), social anxiety disorder (n = 1313) or depression (n = 2400), responded to the PDSS-SR. Six criteria related to factor structure, sensitivity to change and clinical representativeness were used to select items. Psychometric analyses for the selected very brief scale were performed. Results: Items 2 (distress during panic attacks) and 4 (agoraphobic avoidance), were selected to create the very brief PDSS-SR version. Correlations with the full scale were high at screening, pre and post, and for change (0.87-0.93). Categorical Omega was omega(c) = 0.74. With a cut-off of 3 points, the scale could detect panic disorder in a psychiatric sample with a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 66%. Limitations: Limitations include lack of healthy controls and lack of blinding on secondary outcome measures. Conclusion: The proposed 2-item PDSS-SR version is a good candidate for a very brief panic disorder questionnaire, both for detecting cases and for measuring change. This is especially useful in clinical settings when measuring more than one condition at a time.

  • 4.
    Jernelöv, Susanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ylva
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Llenas, Milagros
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nasri, Berkeh
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Effects and clinical feasibility of a behavioral treatment for sleep problems in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a pragmatic within-group pilot evaluation2019In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, p. 1-12, article id 226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSleep disturbances, including insomnia, are common in adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Treatment of choice for insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-i), but evidence is lacking for CBT-i in patients with ADHD.The purpose of this study was to investigate if patients with insomnia and other sleep problems, at a specialist clinic for ADHD, benefit from a group delivered behavioral treatment based on CBT-i; whether insomnia severity improves following this treatment.MethodsThis pragmatic within-group pilot study with a pre to post and three-month follow-up design was set at a specialist psychiatric out-patient clinic for adult ADHD.As an adjunct to care-as-usual at the clinic, a CBT-i-based group treatment targeting several sleep problems prevalent in the ADHD-population, was offered as 10 weekly 90-min group sessions and scheduled telephone support.All outcome measures were subjectively reported by participants. Data analyzed with dependent t-tests according to intent-to-treat.ResultsNineteen patients (37 [SD 13.7] years; 68% female) with ADHD and subjectively reported sleep problems provided informed consent and pre-treatment measures. Patients had suffered from sleep problems for 15.3 [SD 13.4] years, 42% used sleep medications, 79% used stimulant medication(s).At post-treatment, insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index; score range 0-28) had improved with 4.5 points (95% CI, 2.06-6.99, p=.002), at 3months with 6.8 points (95% CI, 4.71-8.91, p<.0001) from pre-treatment.ConclusionsCBT-i adjusted for ADHD is promising for improving insomnia severity in adult patients at specialist psychiatric out-patient clinics, who suffer from ADHD and sleep disturbances.Trial registrationStudy registered with the Regional ethical review board in Stockholm, January 13th 2016, Study id: 2015/2078-31/1. Study registered retrospectively with Clinicaltrials.org, February 21st 2019, ID: NCT03852966.

  • 5.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Jernelöv, Susanna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Blom, Kerstin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ljotsson, Brjann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Brodin, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Jörgensen, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kraepelien, Martin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rück, Christian
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Guided internet cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia compared to a control treatment - A randomized trial2015In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 71, p. 90-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate if internet-delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia (ICBT-i) with brief therapist support outperforms an active control treatment. Method: Adults diagnosed with insomnia were recruited via media (n = 148) and randomized to either eight weeks of ICBT-i or an active internet-based control treatment. Primary outcome was the insomnia severity index (ISI) assessed before and after treatment, with follow-ups after 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes were use of sleep medication, sleep parameters (sleep diary), perceived stress, and a screening of negative treatment effects. Hierarchical Linear Mixed Models were used for intent-to-treat analyses and handling of missing data. Results: ICBT-i was significantly more effective than the control treatment in reducing ISI (Cohen's d = 0.85), sleep medication, sleep efficiency, sleep latency, and sleep quality at post-treatment. The positive effects were sustained. However, after 12 months the difference was no longer significant due to a continuous decrease in ISI among controls, possibly due to their significantly higher utilization of insomnia relevant care after treatment Forty-six negative effects were reported but did not differ between interventions. Conclusions: Supported ICBT-i is more effective than an active control treatment in reducing insomnia severity and treatment gains remain stable one year after treatment (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 6.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University.
    Jernelöv, Susanna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Involving clients in treatment methods: A neglected interaction in the therapeutic relationship2015In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 1136-1141, article id 2015-30577-001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The authors investigate a model on how clients' differential involvement in therapeutic methods mediates the effect of therapist support in psychological treatment-in this case, a cognitive behaviorally based bibliotherapy for insomnia, administered with or without supportive telephone calls.

    METHOD:

    Eighty-nine participants, who fulfilled diagnostic criteria for insomnia, had a mean age of 49.1 years (range, 18-73 years) and were predominantly female (77%), fairly well educated, and mainly Caucasian. Participants were randomized between a bibliotherapeutic self-help treatment and the same treatment with the addition of therapist support. Primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index. Data on involvement in different methods and aspects of the treatment were estimated by clients at posttreatment and validated against therapist ratings of client involvement during treatment. Structural equation modeling was used to test if the effect of therapeutic support on outcome was mediated by involvement in treatment.

    RESULTS:

    Carrying out the treatment with therapist support significantly boosted the therapeutic effects. A mediational analysis with involvement in the three key treatment methods (sleep restriction, sleep compression, and stimulus control) as the mediator fully mediated the differential effect between the two conditions (Sobel test; r = .31; z = 2.173; p < .05) and explained 68.4% of the total effect.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Therapeutic support improved outcome via higher patient involvement rather than having a direct effect on outcome. Thus, relationship and methods could be regarded as interactional, and patient involvement should be considered. These factors could be further studied in treatments where specific ingredients within the therapeutic contact can be experimentally manipulated.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf