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  • 1.
    Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand;Univ Oulu, Finland;Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Baird, Tim
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    James, Michael
    Shenton Pk, Australia.
    Ram, Yael
    Ashkelon Acad Coll, Israel.
    Climate change and cultural heritage: conservation and heritage tourism in the Anthropocene2016In: Journal of Heritage Tourism, ISSN 1743-873X, E-ISSN 1747-6631, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 10-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews some of the actual and potential effects of climate change on cultural heritage and its management with special reference to heritage tourism. This analysis will help to identify knowledge gaps and issues in relation to different types of heritage, management strategies and policy-making, as well as enabling an understanding of the potential significance of climate change impacts in a regional, national and international setting. The analysis is also relevant to understanding the broader pressures of environmental and global change on the management of heritage tourism sites, and cultural heritage in particular, in the Anthropocene.

  • 2.
    Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand;Univ Oulu, Finland;Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Ram, Yael
    Ashkelon Acad Coll, Israel.
    Heritage in the intergovernmental panel on climate change assessment reports: a lexical assessment2016In: Journal of Heritage Tourism, ISSN 1743-873X, E-ISSN 1747-6631, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 96-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A lexical analysis is conducted of the five intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC) assessments reports undertaken between 1990 and 2014. The analysis indicates that the term heritage is little used in the reports, although it has become more widely used over time in different chapters. In contrast, reference to indigenous culture and heritage has greatly increased. The implications are discussed especially for the way in which the IPCC frames culture and heritage. Implications for research communication are briefly discussed.

  • 3.
    Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand;Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Ram, Yael
    Ashkelon Acad Coll, Israel.
    Weather and climate in the assessment of tourism-related walkability2019In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Walking is an important outdoor recreational and tourism activity, both in natural surroundings and in urban settings. Walkability is the extent to which the built environment promotes walking, and addresses issues such as comfort, connectivity, safety and aesthetic values. The paper explores a relatively overlooked domain of recreation- and tourism-related walkability: the extent to which weather and climatic conditions are incorporated into assessments of walkability and their influence on walking behaviour. Following a discussion of the assessment of walkability, the results of a scoping review of weather- and climate-related variables in walkability articles published up to June 2018 are presented. The review indicates there is little research on walkability from a tourist perspective, although there is substantial interest in walking for leisure and recreation. Four major themes were identified. The descriptive theme focuses on the general importance of weather and climate to walkability; the passive analyses the weather and climate conditions as barriers to, or as promoters of, walking; proactive studies refer to adapting to and managing weather, such as provision of shade or snow-clearing. The proactive perspective gains less attention than the passive analysis. Finally, statistical controlling was only employed by a minority of studies that adjusted their results to the impacts of weather conditions. The work concludes that the sub-field has been poorly served with respect to concept and variable definition and consistency of use mean that present knowledge is of limited scientific value. Strategies for future research are suggested.

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