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  • 1.
    Jercic, Petar
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Wen, Wei
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Sundstedt, Veronica
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    The Effect of Emotions and Social Behavior on Performance in a Collaborative Serious Game Between Humans and Autonomous Robots2018In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to investigate performance in a collaborative human–robot interaction on a shared serious game task. Furthermore, the effect of elicited emotions and perceived social behavior categories on players’ performance will be investigated. The participants collaboratively played a turn-taking version of the Tower of Hanoi serious game, together with the human and robot collaborators. The elicited emotions were analyzed in regards to the arousal and valence variables, computed from the Geneva Emotion Wheel questionnaire. Moreover, the perceived social behavior categories were obtained from analyzing and grouping replies to the Interactive Experiences and Trust and Respect questionnaires. It was found that the results did not show a statistically significant difference in participants’ performance between the human or robot collaborators. Moreover, all of the collaborators elicited similar emotions, where the human collaborator was perceived as more credible and socially present than the robot one. It is suggested that using robot collaborators might be as efficient as using human ones, in the context of serious game collaborative tasks.

  • 2.
    Jerčić, Petar
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Lindley, Craig
    CSIRO ICT Centre, Hobart, Australia.
    Physiological Affect and Performance in a Collaborative Serious Game Between Humans and an Autonomous Robot2018In: Entertainment Computing – ICEC 2018: 17th IFIP TC 14 International Conference, Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018, Poznan, Poland, September 17–20, 2018 / [ed] Clua E., Roque L., Lugmayr A., Tuomi P., Springer, 2018, p. 127-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to examine how elicited physiological affect influences the performance of human participants collaborating with the robot partners on a shared serious game task; furthermore, to investigate physiological affect underlying such human-robot proximate collaboration. The participants collaboratively played a turn-taking version of a serious game Tower of Hanoi, where physiological affect was investigated in a valence-arousal space. The arousal was inferred from the galvanic skin response data, while the valence was inferred from the electrocardiography data. It was found that the robot collaborators elicited a higher physiological affect in regard to both arousal and valence, in contrast to their human collaborator counterparts. Furthermore, a comparable performance between all collaborators was found on the serious game task.

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