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  • 1.
    Ellingsen, Sidsel
    et al.
    Haraldsplass University College, Bergen.
    Rosland, Jan-Henrik
    Sunniva, Clinic for Palliative Care, Bergen, Bergen University.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Kristoffersen, Kjell
    Agder University, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Alvsvåg, Herdis
    Haraldsplass University College.
    Experience of time when living with Incurable Disease - A qualitative study2011In: / [ed] In: European Journal of Palliative Care, Lissabon, 2011, p. 190-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ellingsen, Sidsel
    et al.
    Haraldsplass Deaconess University College / Univ Bergen.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Haraldsplass Deaconess University College.
    Kristoffersen, Kjell
    University of Agder.
    Rosland, Jan Henrik
    Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital / Univ Bergen.
    Alvsvåg, Herdis
    Haraldsplass Deaconess University College.
    Being in transit and in transition: the experience of time at the place, when living with severe incurable disease - a phenomenological study2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 458-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe the experience of time as it presents itself at the place being situated when living with severe incurable disease and receiving palliative care. The empirical data consist of 26 open-ended interviews with 23 patients receiving palliative care at home, at a palliative day care, in a palliative bed unit in hospital or in a nursing home in Norway. A common meaning of a shifting space for living emerged from the analysis and was revealed through three different aspects: (i) Transition from a predictable to an unpredictable time: To live with severe incurable disease marks a transition to a changed life involving an ongoing weakened and altered body with bothersome symptoms making experience of time different and unpredictable. (ii) Transition between a safe and unsafe time: When time is unpredictable, feeling safe is revealed as essential to how time is experienced at the place being situated. (iii) To be in transition from a homely to a homeless existence: In a time of increased bodily weakness, unpredictable ailments and displacements, the sense of belonging to the place is revealed as significant to the experience of time. Not knowing where to be in a time of change is like an existential cry of distress where the foothold in existence is lost. The findings are discussed and interpreted as an embodied experience originating from the passage of time continually affecting life sometimes so fundamentally that it marks a transition to a changed space of life that is reflected in the experience of time.

  • 3.
    Ellingsen, Sidsel
    et al.
    Haraldsplass University College, Norway.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Haraldsplass University College, Norway.
    Kristoffersen, Kjell
    Agder University, Norway.
    Rosland, Jan-Henrik
    Bergen University, Norway.
    Alvsvåg, Herdis
    Haraldsplass University College, Norway.
    Entering a world with no future: A phenomenological study describing the embodied experience of time when living with severe incurable disease2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 165-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A phenomenological study describing the embodied experience of time when living with severe incurable disease This article presents findings from a phenomenological study exploring experience of time by patients living close to death. The empirical data consist of 26 open-ended interviews from 23 patients living with severe incurable disease receiving palliative care in Norway. Three aspects of experience of time were revealed as prominent: (i) Entering a world with no future; living close to death alters perception of and relationship to time. (ii) Listening to the rhythm of my body, not looking at the clock; embodied with severe illness, it is the body not the clock that structures and controls the activities of the day. (iii). Receiving time, taking time; being offered - not asked for - help is like receiving time that confirms humanity, in contrast to having to ask for help which is like taking others time and thereby revealing own helplessness. Experience of time close to death is discussed as an embodied experience of inner, contextual, relational dimensions in harmony and disharmony with the rhythm of nature, environment and others. Rhythms in harmony provide relief, while rhythms in disharmony confer weakness and limit time

  • 4.
    Ellingsen, Sidsel
    et al.
    Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Norway;University of Bergen, Norway.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Norway.
    Kristoffersen, Kjell
    Agder University, Norway.
    Rosland, Jan-Henrik
    Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Norway;University of Bergen, Norway.
    Alvsvåg, Herdis
    Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Norway.
    The Pendulum Time of Life: The experience of time, when living with severe incurable disease a phenomenological and philosophical study2015In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the experience of time when living with severe incurable disease. A phenomenological and philosophical approach of description and deciphering were used. In our modern health care system there is an on-going focus on utilizing and recording the use of time, but less focus on the patient’s experience of time, which highlights the need to explore the patients’ experiences, particularly when life is vulnerable and time is limited. The empirical data consisted of 26 open-ended interviews with 23 participants receiving palliative care at home, in hospital or in a nursing home in Norway. The theoretical frameworks used are mainly based upon K. Martinsens philosophy of care, K. E. Løgstrup phenomenological philosophy, in addition to C. Saunders’ hospice philosophy, L. Feigenberg’s thanatology and U. Qvarnström’s research exploring patient’s reactions to impending death. Experience of time is described as being a movement that moves the individual towards death in the field of opposites,and deciphered to be a universal, but a typical and unique experience emerging through three integrated levels: Sense of time; where time is described as a movement that is proceeding at varying speeds. Relate to time; where the awareness of limited life changes the understanding of time to be more existential. Being in time; where limited time seems to clarify the basic living conditions and phenomena of life. The existence of life when the prospect of death is present is characterized by emotional swings that move within polarizing dimensions which is reflected in the experience of time illustrated as the moves of the pendulum in a grandfather clock. The diversity of the experience of time is oscillating between going fast or slow, being busy or calm, being unpredictable but predictable, safe or unsafe and between being good or bad, depending on the embodied situation of the individual.

  • 5.
    Holmqvist, Gärd
    et al.
    Halmstad University ; Vuxenpsykiatriska mottagningen i Skövde ; Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Halmstad University.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University.
    Lundqvist Persson, Cristina
    Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development ; Lund University.
    What art therapists considerto be patient's inner change and how it may appear during art therpy2017In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 56, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore what art therapists consider to be patients’ inner change and how it may appear during art therapy. Thirty-eight trained art therapists with experience of using art therapy as a treatment were included in the study. They were asked to describehow they perceived their patients’ inner change and a situation during arttherapy when they observed such change. An inductive thematic analysis resulted in five themes; Therapeutic alliance, describing trust to the therapist and believe to the method, Creating, which concerns the work in the therapeutic process, while Affect consciousness, Self-awareness,and Ego-strengthare part of the therapy outcome. The situations in which an inner change can be observed have been presented by means of quotations and discussed in relation to different theories and art therapy research. The participating art therapists formed a very heterogeneous group, resulting in an unexpected consistency about what they considered to be an inner change in the patient. The study may be seen as a contribution to further discussion about the benefits of a more common language to describe patients’ inner change in art therapy

  • 6.
    Holmqvist, Gärd
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Halmstad University;VID Specialized University, Norway.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University.
    Lundqvist-Persson, Cristina
    Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development.
    Expressions of vitality affects and basic affects during art therapy and their meaning for inner change2019In: International Journal of Art Therapy, ISSN 1745-4832, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 30-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of vitality affects and basic affects and to shed light on their importance in terms of patients' inner change through art therapy. In an earlier study, where 17 women were interviewed about inner change through art therapy, a secondary deductive content analysis of images and statements was performed exploring the presence of vitality affects and basic affects. Nine of the 17 interviews contained clear descriptions of vitality affects and basic affects in the intersubjective communication between the patient and the therapist, these affects were also mirrored in the patients’ painted images.

    Three cases are used to illustrate the result and how affects were related to inner change. These three cases differ from each other in that they described vitality affects either arising from the art therapist’s empathetic verbal or non-verbal response, from a particular experience in nature, or from the interpreted symbolic language of the image. The common denominator uniting the three cases was the intersubjective communication with the therapist. This study indicates that image making in art therapy gives rise to vitality affects and basic affects that contributes to inner change. It also indicates the importance of having trust in both the method and the art therapist.

     

     

     

  • 7.
    Johansson, Elsie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Nurse’s consolation: A grounded theory study2008In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, consolation has not been clearly defined in nursing science. The purpose of this study was to identify the phenomenon of consolation from the perspective of practising nurses. Data from interviews with 21 nurses were analysed by means of the grounded theory approach. Consolation comprised supportive consolation, avoiding consolation, insufficient consolation and inaccessible consolation, which were integrated into the nurses’ professional approach and personal outlook. More basic research is required in order to illuminate the meaning of the phenomenon of consolation with focus on supportive consolation as well as the non-consolation phenomenon comprising the so-called avoiding, insufficient and inaccessible consolation. In order for nurses to be able to prescribe, carry out and evaluate consoling care which alleviates patient suffering, there is a need for further knowledge of what constitutes and does not constitute consolation.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar Theological Seminary, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Berggren, Ingela
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Community nurses’ experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative care:: A Swedish study2010In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 224-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate community nurses’ experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative care.Background: There are many studies on palliative care but research on how communitynurses experience ethical dilemmas in palliative home care is lacking.The ethical dilemmas to which these nurses are exposed seriouslychallenge their ethical competence.Method: Seven community nurses described their experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative home care.The data was analysed by means of qualitative content analysis.Findings :The core themes that emerged were: powerlessness, frustration, and concern in relation to ethical dilemmas in palliative care. The nurses were motivated and felt responsibility for their patients’ end of life, and relatives, and took their duties seriously. They wanted to satisfy all parties; the patient, the relatives and other palliative care professionals and deal with such issues. The study confirms the need for knowledge about how community nurses experience dilemmas in ethical decision-making. They have the freedom to act and the willingness to make decisions, but they lack competence and knowledge about how their colleagues experience

     

  • 9. Koslander, Tiburtius
    et al.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar Theological Seminary, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Existential and Spiritual Needs in Mental Health Care:: An Ethical and Holistic Perspective2009In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study illuminates how existential needs and spiritual needs are connected with health care ethics and individuals’ mental health and well-being. The term existential needs is defined as the necessity of experiencing life as meaningful, whereas the term spiritual needs is defined as the need of deliverance from despair, guilt and/or sin, and of pastoral care. It discusses whether or not patients’ needs are holistically addressed in Western health care systems that neglect patients’ existential and spiritual needs, because of their biomedical view of Man which recognizes only patients’ physical needs. It excludes a holistic health care which considers all needs, expressed by patients in treatment of mental illness. Addressing all needs is important for patients’ improvement and recovery. For some patients, this is the only way to regain their mental health and well-being.

  • 10.
    Manasatchakun, Pornpun
    et al.
    Mälardalen University;Boromarajonani College of Nursing Udon Thani, Thailand.
    Choowattanapakorn, Tassana
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Halmstad University;VID Specialized University, Norway.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University.
    Community nurses’ experiences regarding the meaning and promotion of healthy aging in northeastern Thailand2018In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 54-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Describe community nurses’ experiences regarding the meaning and promotion of healthy aging in northeastern Thailand.

    Method: Data were collected through five focus group interviews with 36 community nurses in northeastern Thailand. Latent content analysis was conducted to analyze the data.

    Findings: Healthy aging was characterized by the interconnection of older persons, older persons’ family members and the community. Healthy aging was associated with two themes: “being strong” and “being a supporter and feeling supported”. The nurses’ experiences in promoting healthy aging were described using the themes “providing health assessment”, “sharing knowledge” and “having limited resources”.

    Conclusions: The findings of this study provide a deeper understanding of the meaning of healthy aging from a holistic viewpoint. Community nurses must pay attention to older persons and their surroundings when planning how to promote healthy aging. Person-centredness should be applied in practice to promote healthy aging. The current findings contribute useful information that should help policy makers develop healthy aging strategies in Thailand.

  • 11.
    Manasatchakun, Pornpun
    et al.
    Mälardalen University ; Boromarajonani College of Nursing Udon Thani, Thailand.
    Chotiga, Pleumit
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Hochvälder, Jareck
    Mälardalen University.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Mälardalen University ; Halmstad University ; VID Specialized University, Norway.
    Sandborgh, Maria
    Mälardalen University.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University.
    Factors associated with healthy ageing among older persons in Northeastern Thailand2016In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe factors associated with perceived health and healthy aging among older people in northeastern Thailand. Thailand's aging population is growing and facing an increasing old-age dependency ratio. Northeastern Thailand, known as Isan, is a region in which the number of older residents is projected to grow rapidly. Older people in this region are likely to confront great threats to their health and well-being. These issues require appropriate attention and actions to promote healthy aging. However, healthy aging in this region has not been studied. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 453 older people, aged 60 years or older. Participants completed the Healthy Aging Instrument (HAI) and provided relevant demographic characteristics. Mann-Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests and multiple regression models were used to analyze the data. Through comparative analyses, significant differences in HAI scores were observed for the following factors: marital status, residential area, disability, income level, and perceived meaningfulness in life. In the multiple regression models, residential area, disability, and marital status explained 24.30 % of the variance in HAI scores. Health promotion strategies and future targeted intervention programs should consider the importance of these factors.

  • 12.
    Manasatchakun, Pornpun
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Chotiga, Pleumjit
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Mälardalen University.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University.
    Healthy Ageing in Isan-Thai culture: A phenomenographic study based on older persons' lived experiences2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 29463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy ageing is a concept that concerns older persons’ quality of life and is a key factor in promoting wellbeing. The older population in Thailand is growing. Isan (a region of north-eastern Thailand) has been reported as having one of the most rapidly increasing older populations in the country. In order to care for and promote the health of older people, healthcare providers should understand how healthy ageing is perceived by this target group. Although healthy ageing has been studied in different contexts as well as perspectives,no studies have previously focused on older persons’ experiences of healthy ageing from a life world perspective in Isan-Thai. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe older persons’ qualitatively different conceptions of healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture. A phenomenographic approach with an epistemological base in lifeworld theory was used to disclose the various ways to conceptualize healthy ageing. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 older people aged 60 and above who live in Isan-Thai. The findings of this study revealed three categories of descriptions: “being independent in dependence”, “being at peace”, and “being a valuable person”. This study also found family members, friends, healthcare providers, and religion important to healthy ageing in the Isan-Thai culture. Understanding how older people conceptualize healthy aging is valuable for healthcare providers. They can apply these findings regarding healthy ageing in their fieldwork when caring for older people.

  • 13.
    Manasatchakun, Pornpun
    et al.
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Thailand.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Halmstad University ; VID Specialized University, Bergen.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University.
    Conceptions of healthy aging held by relatives of older persons in Isan-Thai culture: a phenomenographic study2018In: Journal of Aging Research, ISSN 2090-2204, E-ISSN 2090-2212, Vol. 2018, article id 3734645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Thailand, family nurses are expected to provide support for older persons and their family members to promote healthy aging. Family bonds are strong, and relatives are expected to take care of their older family members. However, there is limited research on how older persons’ family members perceive healthy aging. This study aimed to describe the conceptions of healthy aging held by the children and grandchildren of older persons in northeast Thailand. In a phenomenographic study, 14 interviews were performed to qualitatively analyze different conceptions of healthy aging. Four descriptive categories emerged: being independent, not being afflicted by diseases or illnesses, being a giver and a receiver, and being wise. The conceptions of healthy aging entail both autonomy and interdependence. The relative’s perspective needs to be considered when policies relating to healthy aging are implemented in the community and when family nurses provide support to families to promote healthy aging.

  • 14.
    Rask, Mikael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Malm, Dan
    School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Kristofferzon,, Marja-Leena
    Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, School of Health and Caring Sciences, Gävle.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Svedberg, Petra
    University College of Halmstad.
    Arenhill, Eva
    Baigi, Amir
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Annica, Sjostrom-Strand
    Wieslander, Inger
    University College of Halmstad.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Validity and Reliability of a Swedish Version of the Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS) – Pilot Study2010In: Canadian Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0843-6096, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 16-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for a short and easily administered scale, in the Swedish language, for assessing partner relationships in the health care of persons with cardiac disease.

    PURPOSE: To establish the reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS).

    DESIGN: The present pilot study has a methodological design.

    FINDINGS: Content validity has been tested for relevance, clarity and readability. The scale was tested for construct validity with explorative factor analysis. The reliability was tested by internal consistency and test-retest analysis. The result showed a two-factor solution, which does not correspond to the original proposed one-factor solution. The factor analyses revealed two quite distinct factors of RAS, labelled "Relationship built on expectations and satisfaction of needs" and "Relationship built on love and devotion".

    CONCLUSIONS: The scale has satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of content validity, construct validity, homogeneity and stability in a population of persons with cardiac disease. Wider evaluations of the RAS for other populations and settings are recommended.

  • 15.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Anthology review: ”Dawn. An anthology of caring science".2002In: Theoria: Journal of Nursing theory, ISSN 1400-8033, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-28Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    I det otänkbaras mitt2011In: BestPractice Psykiatri/Neurologi Yrkesdialog mellan specialister, ISSN 1902-7583, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Slutsats

    De som drabbats av naturkatastrof lever som i två världar, den tidigare välkända och den nuvarande oigenkännliga. Att samtidigt köpa mjölk och gravljus är ett exempel på denna komplexitet. I dessa världar söker de rekonstruera och möblera sitt inre rum att känna sig hemma i. I denna process behövs medmänniskor som uthärdar rekonstruktionen och som varsamt återför dem till detta arbete när de går vilse. Renoveringen är de drabbades möjlighet, en väg till en framtid med förändrade livsmål.

  • 17.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Om tröst och att trösta2010In: Michael, ISSN 1504-0658, Vol. 7, p. 282-286Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Tröst2012In: Vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i teori och praktik / [ed] Wiklund Gustin L., Bergbom I, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, 1, p. 437-446Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är tröst och Hur trösta? Svaren på frågorna tycks givna. Forskning visar emellertid att tröst inte alltid är vad vi tror att den är, önskar att den skulle vara och förmedlas på sätt som vi minst anar. Frågan är vilken betydelse tröst har för människor idag på 2000-talet och hur viktig tröst och tröstande är för vårdvetenskap.

  • 19.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Var ska jag kunna få tröst? Om tröst och att trösta2009In: Tidsskrift for Fag of Tro, ISSN 1503-6456, Vol. 4, p. 7-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Vårdande och icke-vårdande tröst2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the thesis is, from a caring science perspective including a caring theology perspective, to illustrate the meaning of the phenomenon consolation and how consolation relates to suffering and care. Two studies were completed where staff and elderly care receivers were interviewed and a third study focused on an analysis of consolation as it is presented in the Book of Job in the Old Testament. These studies deal with carers’ experiences of consolation and consoling, elderly care receivers’ ex- periences of consolation, and Job’s experience of consolation.

    Phenomenology and hermeneutics form the basis for the methodological approach. A phenomenologi- cal-hermeneutic method, inspired by Paul Ricoeur, has been used for the text analyses. The thesis also covers significant aspects of poetical and religious texts. The metaphors that occur in the interview studies with the carers and the elderly are analysed in order to take care of the excess of meaning that, according to Ricoeur, can be expressed in metaphors.

    The result show five overall meanings: The contradictory consolation, The bonding consolation, The mute and rigid consolation, The uncontrolled consolation and The restful consolation. A caring conso- lation is contradictory in the sense that it entails that the sufferer on the one hand passes on his or her suffering to someone else and on the other hand that the suffering can be returned to be suffered. Con- solation can thus entail suffering. The bonding consolation is present, i.e. is with the sufferer and is based on that person’s suffering. This consolation is characterised by a close fellowship, a feeling of being understood at a deeper level. The results also reveal a consolation that is mute and rigid. This consolation does not respond to the sufferer’s experience of his or her suffering, is shapeless and therefore unable to follow the suffering. An example of a mute, rigid and non-caring consolation is the consolation of the friends in the Book of Job. This consolation is not capable of consoling because it does not correspond to where Job is, i.e. in his experience of his suffering. A caring consolation is also uncontrolled because it is on the one hand spontaneous and on the other hand helps the sufferer to lose control over the suffering. To lose control entails, amongst other things, the sufferer giving up trying to understand suffering and instead lets that which is incomprehensible be incomprehensible. A con- soling and health-bringing rest in or from the struggle with suffering presents itself by giving up what in various ways is tied to the suffering.

    The result as a whole is interpreted from a caring science perspective with the following important concepts: caring relationship, faith, health and sacrifice. Consolation as health is considered on the basis of a theoretical model inspired by Katie Eriksson’s ontological health model. The research is also illustrated from a philosophical-ethical perspective, mainly based on the work of Emmanuel Levinas. The findings are discussed in relation to previous research and also to caring science, society and care. 

  • 21.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Haraldsplass University College, Norway.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar Theological Seminary, Norway.
    Where can I find consolation?: A theoretical analysis of the meaning of consolation as experienced by Job in the Book of Job in the Hebrew bible2013In: Journal of religion and health, ISSN 0022-4197, E-ISSN 1573-6571, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 114-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the meaning of consolation as experienced by Job in the Book of Job and as presented in literature and how consolation relates to suffering and care. The study’s theoretical design applied Ricoeur’s view on phenomenology and hermeneutics. The resulting themes were as follows: consolation that is present, that originates in confrontation, that keeps suffering at a distance, that does not alleviate suffering, that originates in experience from giving comfort, and that facilitates a change of perspective. The authentic and caring consolation accepts the sufferer’s incomprehensible “otherness” but however provides no answers about how to console.

  • 22.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Burman, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Guldbrand, Mona
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar College and Theological Seminary, Kristiansand, Norway..
    Out of the wave: the meaning of suffering and relieved suffering for survivors of the tsunami catastrophe. An hermeneutic-phenomenological study of TV-interviews one year after the tsunami catastrophe, 20042010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 707-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tsunami catastrophe, 26th December 2004, is one of a number of catastrophes that has stricken mankind. Climate reports forecast that natural disasters will increase in number in the future. Research on human suffering after a major catastrophe, using a caring science perspective, is scarce. The aim of the study was to explore the meaning of suffering and relieved suffering of survivors of the tsunami catastrophe, 26th December 2004. An explorative study design, inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur’s hermeneutic-phenomenology, was used. Interviews made by the Swedish Television (SVT) in connection with the 1 year anniversary were carried out on site in the disaster area and in Sweden. The text analysis revealed four main themes: ‘An incomprehensible event’, ‘A heavy burden’, ‘Help that helps’, and to ‘Being changed in a changed life situation’. The findings were mainly interpreted in light of Paul Ricoeur’s thinking on suffering, quilt, forgiveness, time and narrative. The first year after the loss of loved ones in the tsunami catastrophe, 2004, was like starting an inner as well as an outer journey. This journey was experienced as living with the heavy burden of an incomprehensible event. Help that helped was mediated by consolers who endured the suffering of the other. An ‘enduring courage’ is a key moral virtue to encounter the alienation of the sufferer and how it in turn alienates from the sufferer. It is also important to recognize that the complexity of the world of those who have lost loved ones in major catastrophes includes possibilities for reconciliation with the loss. The reconciliation creates hope that opens up for being changed in a changed life situation.

  • 23.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Mälardalen Univ / Univ Coll Haraldsplass, Bergen, Norway.
    da Silva, Antonio Barbosa
    Ansgar Theol Seminary, Kristiansand, Norway.
    The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Catastrophe, its Survivors, Job and the Universal Features of Suffering: A Theoretical Study2014In: Journal of religion and health, ISSN 0022-4197, E-ISSN 1573-6571, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 1257-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this theoretical article is to discuss the existential and universal feature of suffering-as illustrated by Job's suffering in the Book of Job in the Bible and by the survivors of the 2004 Asian tsunami catastrophe-and to highlight its significance for health care. Further, the study is aiming at contributing to health professionals' understanding of patients' suffering. The sources are narratives, comprising Job's book, TV interviews 1 year after the tsunami catastrophe and the survivors' autobiographies. The methodological approach is a philosophical analysis. The existential, universal, ontological and epistemological aspects of suffering are carefully scrutinized to unveil the universal and existential versus culture-specific features of suffering. Based on the results, the authors' recommendations are (1) a holistic concept of the patient and health care has to seriously consider suffering in all its complexity because when a person is in pain, it is not his/her body but the whole person as a unity of body, psyche and spirit that suffers and (2) suffering should be seen as the most central concept of health care, which should provide treatment for physical pain and all dimensions of suffering: physical, social, mental and spiritual aspects.

  • 24.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Stolt, Carl-Magnus
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work. School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    In the midst of the unthinkable: A phenomenological life-world approach to the experiences of suffering and relieved suffering during the tsunami catastrophe, 2004.2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to highlight the instantaneous experience of suffering and relieved suffering that was presented on the Swedish Television (SVT) by those who experienced the tsunami wave in Thailand, 26 December 2004. The selected TV-interviews were watched, transcribed and conducted with an empirical phenomenological analysis. A phenomenological lifeworld approach, inspired by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, was chosen for the theoretical framework.The findings showed three main features: the motion, the stillnessandthe shift in perspective. The motion comprised both the motion of the wave and the motion it caused the victims in terms of external as well as internal disorder. When the tsunami waves withdrew, it was followed by stillness. The feeling of being unreal was prominent, triggered by lack of information and endless waiting. Another prominent feature was the victims’ incapacity to answer ‘‘how long’’ they had suffered before being rescued. The tsunami catastrophe seemed to be a timeless event. Caring for other victims meant a shift in perspective in one’s own devastated world to that of another person. The shift between focus and comprehension, contributed to the making of life-saving decisions, for the victims themselves and for other victims. The findings were mainly reflected on from the perspective of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, for example the experience of time as an embedded and lived now. It was also reflected on from the perspective of the German philosopher Karl Jaspers as a limit-experience and as a fulfilment of love. A suggestion for further research is to investigate how suffering and relieved suffering is experienced and encountered when further time has passed.

    Key words:Tsunami, catastrophe, suffering, relieved suffering, care, phenomenology, lifeworld

  • 25.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Eriksson, Katie
    Åbo Academy.
    Rehnsfeldt, Arne
    Linköpings universitet.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    The meaning of consolation as experienced by nurses in a home-care setting2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1079-1087p. 1079-1087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objective. The aim of this study was to illuminate nurses’ experiences ofconsolation and how these experiences relate to suffering and care.Background. Consolation is commonly associated with the relief of suffering. Thequestion of consolation in terms of its definition and relevance for care has, however,been a matter of discussion among nurse researchers. The question raisedconcerns about the nature of consolation, its place and its role in relation to care andthe caring sciences.Design. An explorative qualitative interview study with 12 participants, six registeredand six enrolled nurses, was carried out in a home-care context.Methods. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the French philosopherPaul Ricoeur was used for the text analysis.Results. Two main aspects of consolation appeared: ‘the present consolation’, whichis flexible, sustaining and opening and ‘the absent consolation’, which conceals thesuffering and is incapable of consoling. The result was interpreted from a philosophical-ethical perspective, based on the works of Levinas and Lo¨ gstrup.Conclusions. Consolation appears as a complex phenomenon, both in terms of itsexistence and its absence consolation, constituting a caring and non-caring consolation.A caring consolation entails meeting the other as different and being presentin a way that gives the other space to be the one he or she really is. It requiresacceptance, accepting the sufferer and his/her way of suffering as unique.

  • 26.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. University College of Haraldsplass, Norway.
    Sameby, Jessica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brodin, Sandra
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. Jönköping University.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar Theological Seminary, Norway.
    Out of the wave: The meaning of suffering and relief from suffering as described in autobiographies by survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 5323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of suffering and relief from suffering as described in autobiographies by tourists who experienced the tsunami on 26 December 2004 and lost loved ones. A lifeworld approach, inspired by the French philosopher Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception, was chosen for the theoretical framework. This catastrophe totally changed the survivors' world within a moment. In this new world, there were three main phases: the power of remaining focused, a life of despair, and the unbearable becoming bearable. Life turns into a matter of making the unbearable bearable. Such challenging experiences are discussed in terms of the philosophy of Weil, Jaspers, and Merleau-Ponty. The survivors of the tsunami catastrophe were facing a boundary situation and "le malheur," the unthinkable misfortune. Even at this lowest level of misfortune, joy is possible to experience. This is part of the survivors' ambivalent experiences of their lifeworld. In this world of the uttermost despair there are also rays of hope, joy, and new life possibilities.

  • 27.
    Strand, Thomas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Törnqvist, Erna
    Lund University.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    An intervention-based study of how MRI is perceived by patients with spinal metastasis after adjustments to the examination procedures2018In: Journal of Radiology Nursing, ISSN 1546-0843, E-ISSN 1555-9912, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiences of patients with spinal metastasis after adjustments to the examination procedures have been made in accordance with the findings from a previous study. MRI is an important medical technology, which is considered to be the first choice of examination method when diagnosing and evaluating spinal metastatic tumors. It is a challenge to care for patients who experience anxiety and pain during an MRI. However, several aspects of the examination can be adjusted to improve the care for these patients. Findings from previous research were used to develop a care intervention, the effects of which are explored in this study. Qualitative deductive-inductive content analysis was used in this study. Eleven patients with spinal metastasis were interviewed about their experiences of going through an MRI scan based on an intervention designed in accordance with the findings from previous research. The findings showed that adjustments to the examination often were perceived as beneficial. However, patients needed to be involved in the decisions that influenced their own care. Time was an important component that affected the need for being prepared as well as the degree of personalization of the examination. This study shows that patients need to be seen as unique individuals, and they need to be able to influence the care that is given to them. The personalization of and adjustments to the examination routines need to be carried out in agreement with the patient.

  • 28.
    Strand, Thomas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Törnqvist, Erna
    Lund University.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an MRI examination2018In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 79-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is without question the best tool used for diagnosing and evaluating spinal metastasis. An MRI examination is known to be of great value for the treatment planning and survival of these patients. Radiographers have an important role in how the quality of care is experienced by the patients during an MRI examination. The purpose of the study was to describe the radiographers’ perceptions of caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an examination with MRI.

    Methods: Phenomenography was used to analyze the data in this study. Ten radiographers, one male and nine females were interviewed about their perception of caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an MRI examination.

    Results: The findings showed that the radiographers’ caring perspective influenced their approach towards what they consider to be essential in the care of patients with spinal metastasis. This can impact the extent of the adjustment to the care needs of the patients. Furthermore, the findings showed that there was a strong connection between the radiographers’ care approach and preparedness to personalize the care.

    Conclusion: This study shows that it is important to be flexible when providing care for the patients. A person-centered care is achieved when the caring perspective is based on the patient’s view and adjustments are made in agreement with the patient.

  • 29.
    Strand, Thomas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Törnqvist, Erna
    Lund University.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The experience of patients with neoplasm metastasis in the spine during a magnetic resonance imaging examination2014In: Journal of Radiology Nursing, ISSN 1546-0843, E-ISSN 1555-9912, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the experience of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination by patients with neoplasm metastasis in the spine. MRI is the most accurate method to diagnose and evaluate suspected metastatic disease in the spine. Patients may experience anxiety because of the fear of pain, fear of the unknown, and the apprehension about what the test might reveal. The study had a qualitative design, and the collected data were analyzed by means of latent content analysis. Twelve semistructured in-depth interviews were carried out starting with the question “Can you tell me about your experience of the MRI examination?” Four themes were identified: “motivation,” “worry and anxiety,” “insecurity,” and “security.” The patients were highly motivated to be examined by MRI, although most of them did experience some degree of worry or anxiety. The level of worry or anxiety was generated by the perception that an MRI examination was unpleasant, uncomfortable, or by the fear of what the result would show. All participants experienced some degree of insecurity, but in different ways, the insecurity of the patient could be reduced and the patients could experience a greater degree of security. The feelings of insecurity or security could be influenced by the radiographer, patients themselves, and MRI equipment. This study shows that most patients usually experience worry and anxiety. If the patients are motivated, they can manage to go through the examination in spite of the previously mentioned adverse feelings. Patients' feelings tend to fluctuate between a sense of insecurity and one of security.

  • 30.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    University College of Halmstad.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Nilsson, Ulrica G
    Umeå Universitet, Örebro University.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Baigi, Amir
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå Universitet.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Persson, Sylvi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Alm Roijer, Carin
    Malmö högskola.
    Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Krantz Health Opinion Survey2012In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 181-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psy- chometric properties of a Swedish version of The Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS). A conven- ience sample of 79 persons (47 men and 32 women) was recruited from The Heart and Lung Patients’ National Association at ten local meeting places in different areas in Sweden. The questionnaire was examined for face and content validity, internal con-sistency and test-retest reliability. The findings showed that the Swedish version of KHOS is accept- able in terms of face and content validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability over time among 79 individuals >65 years of age and with a cardiac disease. In conclusion, wider evaluations of the psy- chometric use of KHOS for other populations and settings are recommended.

  • 31.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    University College of Halmstad.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköpings universitet.
    Persson, Sylvi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Baigi, Amir
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Alm Roijer, Carin
    Malmö högskola.
    Malm, Dan
    School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Umeå Universitet, Örebro universitet.
    Psychometric evaluation of “The 25-item Sex after MI Knowledge Test” in a Swedish context2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 203-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patients’ sexual life after a myocardial infarction is important for his/her quality of life. In spite of this, many patients are in doubt regarding their sex life after a myocardial infarction (MI) and the sexual information received, and counselling from health care providers has been seen to be insufficient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of ‘The 25-item Sex after MI Knowledge Test’ in a Swedish context. A convenience sample was recruited. The scale was translated into Swedish and completed by 79 former patients from The Heart and Lung Patients’ National Association on two occasions, with an interval of 2 weeks. The scale was tested for face and content validity, internal consistency and test–retest reliability. The result in this study indicates that the instrument has good face and content validity and displayed a moderate internal consistency (alpha 0.61). The instrument showed some level of instability in test–retest reliability with 60% of the items presenting moderate or strong agreement between the test and retest. Further studies that use this instrument in larger and more diverse samples are thus needed.

  • 32.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andershed, B.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Guilt and shame in end of life care: the next of kin's perspective2013In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 49, p. S376-S377Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Feelings of guilt: Experiences of next-of-kin in end-of-life care2013In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of guilt of the next-of-kin in end-of-life care. Seventeen next-of-kin who had lost a loved one were interviewed with a focus on possible experiences of guilt. A Gadamerian-based hermeneutic approach to interpret these experiences was used. The interpretation showed that next-of-kin’s experiences of guilt emanated from a situation where the next-of-kin had a moral view on what was the right thing to do, it could also originate from a wish to do the best possible for the dying person out of love for this person. The situation could also involve both these aspects.  The way in which the situation was handled, could, if the next-of-kin felt that s/he did not fulfill her/his commitments, omitted or neglected the dying person or was the cause of something, lead to experiences of guilt. The situation of being next-of-kin in end-of-life care is complex and demanding, something that health professionals are and should be aware of. Acknowledgement of experiences of guilt can help the next-of-kin in their adaptation to the end-of-life situation as a whole and maybe also give useful tools to support next-of-kin through bereavement.

  • 34.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Mälardalen University;Haraldsplass University College, Norway.
    The room as metaphor: next-of-kin's experiences in end-of-life care2015In: International Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 2356-7074, Vol. 2015, article id 357827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The “room” in end-of-life is a phenomenon that needs deeper understanding as it is a dimension that shows how health and suffering are shaped. Research on the concept of room was chosen as theoretical foundation in this study in order to reach a profound understanding of the next-of-kin’s “room” in end-of-life care. Lassenius’s hermeneutic interpretation inmetaphorical language was used as an deductive-inductive approach to the empirical data. The data material comprised 33 interviews with next-of-kin about their experiences of end-of-life care when being close to a relative dying from a cancer disease. The analysis of the data formed four cases: the Standby, the Asylum, the Wall, and the Place.These cases lend their voices to the experiences of the next-of-kin in the study.The findings of this study explain and may well assist nurses to understand the experiences of being next-of-kin in end-of-life care as forming a room of rest from the suffering, a room of controlling the suffering, a room of hiding from the suffering, and a room of belonging.

  • 35.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Gjovik University College, Gjovik, Norway.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Guilt and shame: a semantic concept analysis of two concepts related to palliative care2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 787-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The theoretical viewpoint of the study was based on the fundamental motive in caring science; the suffering person and his/her health and life situation, which according to the philosophy of palliative care also includes the next-of-kin. The latter often wish to participate in the care of their loved ones and it is thus important for them to be able to make decisions that can generate a meaningful participation. Unfulfilled obligations or wrong decisions, concerning their dying relative, can result in experiences of guilt and shame in relation to the care of the loved one. A semantic concept analysis can provide a deeper understanding of these concepts and create a deeper insight into what the concepts mean for the individual.

     

    Aim

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the meaning of and the distinction between the concepts of guilt and shame.

     

    Methods

    Semantic concept analysis based on Koort and Eriksson.

     

    Findings

    The findings show that guilt and shame are two separate concepts. Guilt contains meaning dimensions of being the cause of and sin. Shame contains meaning dimensions of something that gives rise to shame and ability to experience shame. The synonyms for each concept do not overlap each other

     

    Conclusion

    The semantic analysis creates an understanding of the concepts ontologically and provides a basis for theoretical, contextual and clinical understanding and development.

  • 36.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Mälardalen University.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Next of Kin's Experiences of Shame in End-of-Life Care2014In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of shame of next of kin in end-of-life care. Seventeen next of kin who had lost a family member were interviewed. A method inspired by Gadamer's hermeneutic approach was used to interpret possible experiences of shame and to discuss these interpretations. The result showed that next of kin's experiences of shame are linked to their perception of the remaining time and are guided by views on morality and what is right and wrong. Shame can occur when the next of kin are involved and actually cause harm to the family member as well as in situations that are beyond their control. Shame can also involve actions that have nothing to do with what they have actually done but is instead a shame that is placed on them by others, for example, health professionals or relatives. Shame is interpreted as experiences of ignominy, humiliation, and disgrace. Second-order shame is also found. It is important that health professionals are aware of these experiences of unhealthy shame when they meet and support next of kin in end-of-life care.

  • 37.
    Berglund, Maria (Editor)
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie (Editor)
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Roxberg, Åsa (Editor)
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Vårdvetenskapliga vägskäl2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna vårdvetenskapliga jubileumsskrift tar läsaren med på en resa genom den utveckling som skett av ämnet vid forskarutbildning i vårdvetenskap vid Växjö universitet. Många bäckar små… ett talesätt som kan illustrera det gemensamma arbete och den samlade kunskap som ligger bakom denna skrift. I skriften får vi stifta bekantskap med vårdvetenskapen i varierande kontexter alltifrån rättpsykiatri till akut- och hemsjukvård. Sammanställningen av den vårdvetenskapliga forskning som under denna femårsperiod har gjorts på IVOSA visar att vårdvetenskapen är en autonom vetenskap med en tydlig substans eller kärna. I kärnan finns patienten, och ämnet tar sin utgångspunkt i människors existens. Med fokus på människan som är i behov av vård framträder lidande, hälsa och välbefinnande som väsentliga begrepp. I bokens delar fördjupas och kontextualiseras vårdvetenskapen i skiftande vårdande liksom lärande miljöer. En vårdvetenskap med grund i ett patientperspektiv behövs såväl akademiskt som i vården för att anta både dagens och morgondagens utmaningar.

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