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  • 1.
    Alpenberg, Jan
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Arenainvesteringar i Sverige: rationella processer och samhällelig legitimering i internationell belysning2006In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 9-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Bredberg, Clara
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Johnsson, Anna
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Karlström, Josephine
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Lewis, Amanda
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Nilsson, Linnea
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Rosell, Erik
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Entreprenöriella landsbygdsenklaver: forskningsrapport om forsknings- och studentprojekt genomförda i Urshults socken under 20132013Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Engström, Sixten
    Gaddefors, Johan
    SLU.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Meisner, Hampus
    Persson, Anna
    Rosell, Erik
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Entreprenöriella landsbygdsenklaver: Genomförda studentprojekt i Älmeboda2013Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Rosell, Erik
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Rural entrepreneurship research: promoting reflexivity or functional stupidity?2013In: Conference abstracts: 11th Rural Enterprise Conference, University of West Scotland , 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper departs from an ongoing interactive research project on entrepreneurial enclaves in southern Sweden aimed at promoting regional development through interaction between local stakeholders, academic researchers and undergraduate university students in three different municipalities. The logic of the project is that university students and academic researchers launch projects in the three municipalities. The projects are planned and performed with support from the local community. By initiating projects in the three municipalities, the research idea is that processes will start that can lead to new initiatives. Through initiating action and interaction the aim of the project is, in an experimental way, to see how entrepreneurship is mobilized. The question is how activities develop in the municipalities as a result of the research project, and how conflicts and resistance partake in this process.

    After having worked with the research project for half a year two issues surprised us; the conformity of the ideas in our three enclaves and the close relatedness, when it comes to practical solutions, between practice and academia. The research project seemed to have resulted in standardized, expected and widespread, common solutions to the kinds of problems and opportunities that are ascribed to the rural areas. As the solutions produced within the project are collaboratively discussed and decided upon by academic staff and local stakeholders, the fault of this lack of imagination seem to be a problem for all of us. Preconceptions about what is important in rural entrepreneurship guide us as researchers when we try to understand the field. Preconceptions were also a point of departure in the enclaves we studied, resulting in a few common solutions for how to cope with downturn and produce regional development. In this paper we are using the concept of functional stupidity (Alvesson & Spicer, 2012) to reflect upon the benefits as well as the drawbacks of the tendency, in the academy as well as in society at large, to produce a stereotypical menu of problems and suggested solutions when it comes to rural development. We also discuss the possibility to break this norm by promoting a kind of reflexivity that has the potential to produce surprising and norm-breaking ideas in the area of rural development.

  • 5.
    Gnan, Luca
    et al.
    University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Lundberg, HansLinnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.Songini, LucreziaEastern Piedmont University, Italy.Pellegrini, MassimilianoPrincess Sumaya University, Jordan.
    Advancing European entrepreneurship research: entrepreneurship as a working attitude, a mode of thinking and an everyday practice2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective with the Strategic Interest Group in Entrepreneurship (Sig Entrepreneurship) of the European Academy of Management (Euram) is to be the leading research community for engaged entrepreneurship scholars in Europe. The Sig Entrepreneurship aims at promoting research and networking interests for individuals and research groups focused on entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial styles of management. This is done by providing a wide-ranging, engaged and internationally-focused forum to discuss and develop research and practice in the field. We put a distinct focus on the key European feature – 'context matter' – why we try in all activities to promote and stimulate what 'European' might mean in any given context. It means different things in different contexts – and that is the whole point – and thereby the key strength of the European takes on the matter as we see it. This is our idea of the European perspective on entrepreneurship. The tradition of European scholars on entrepreneurship and Smes system has been consolidated during the last three decades and an increasingly distinct European school of thought has emerged as a consequence. This development provides a solid base for the future development of the field where Europe and its entrepreneurship scholars will play an increasingly prominent role. With this concern, this book has been managed, gathering the best contributions of our annual meeting re-edited and improved. The central theme is presenting entrepreneurship understood as a working attitude, a mode of thinking, a concrete everyday practice and increasingly an identity marker for ways of being and living within liquid modernity. Entrepreneurship is nowadays a broadly endorsed and accepted signifier for forms of organizing that targets human, organizational and economic renewal and growth.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Bill, Frederic
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Rosell, Erik
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Andersson, Oskar
    Östmark, Sanna
    Meisner, Hampus
    Entreprenöriella landsbygdsenklaver: Förutsättningar för och mobilisering av entreprenörskap i Långasjö2013Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Conditions for business model innovation in a rural community2013In: 36th Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (ISBE) Annual Conference: Escape Velocity: Entrepreneurship in an Internationalising Environment / [ed] Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, London: Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (ISBE) , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper departs from an interactive research project in three small rural communities in southeast Sweden aimed at promoting regional development through interaction between local stakeholders, academic researchers and undergraduate university students.

    Objective - The objective with this paper is to analyse the conditions for business model innovation in the small rural community of Urshult, Småland, in Southeast Sweden. The theoretical concept of ‘space of opportunity’ is used to analyse two main types of context-sensitive conditions, historical-structural conditions and discursive-communicative conditions.

    Prior Work and its Relation to this Study - The academic discourse on rural development is somewhat homogeneous both when it comes to definitions of problems and the suggested solutions (Johansson, 2011; Gaddefors, Johansson,Lundberg & Rosell, 2013). Business model innovation research is also somewhat homogenous as it focuses heavily on the re-configuring of existing (big) companies and the actions and concerns of top management (Bucherer, Eisert & Gassmann, 2012). Relative to prior work and with the objective outlined above, this paper aim to contribute to rural entrepreneurship research by targeting a less common unit of analysis (collaborative efforts by a rural community engaging in strategic re-configuring of their community as a whole rather than targeted efforts by top management to reconfigure their firm or parts of it) as well as a less common temporal focus (a focus on nascent processes that explores and so some extent establishes the conditions for a new business model for the community, upon which “conventional entrepreneurship” later on may take place (if to scan, seize and exploit a market opportunity, there first needs to be a market to act upon). With such a unit of analysis and such a temporal focus, the conditions for business model innovation in a Swedish rural entrepreneurial enclave are analysed.

    Approach - Data was generated through a six-month long field study where interactive methods were used to mobilise entrepreneurial energies in the community of Urshult. Data was analysed with a discursive narrative methodology called ‘communicative entrepreneurship’ (Lundberg, 2009), which is a methodology applied to entrepreneurship more specifically derived out of a broader approach on discursive and narrative methods within entrepreneurship research developed by Hjorth (2004) called ‘genealogical storytelling’.

    Results - An outline of conditions for business model innovation in a rural community is presented.

    Implications - The paper provides a different analytical focus relative to established paradigms within ruraldevelopment research and practice and within business model innovation research and practice.

    Value - The fields of rural development (located mainly in SME research, family business research and entrepreneurship research) and business model innovation (located mainly in strategy research and innovation research) has at large not been connected before why the core value with this paper is the attempt of connecting the two fields in search for novel insights and findings.

  • 8.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Introduction: advancing European entrepreneurship research: a note on the formation and growth of the SIG entrepreneurship of EURAM2014In: Advancing European entrepreneurship research: entrepreneurship as a working attitude, a mode of thinking and an everyday practice / [ed] Luca Gnan, Hans Lundberg, Lucrezia Songini, Massimiliano Pellegrini, Charlotte: Information Age Publishing, 2014, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Kommunikativt entreprenörskap: Underhållningsidrott som totalupplevelse före, under och efter formeringen av den svenska upplevelseindustrin 1999-20082009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003, sixteen Swedish humanists proposed the idea of a communicative democracy. Same year, leading Scandinavian organizational theory scholars proposed that Scandinavian welfare states efforts to revitalize their democracies can be understood as ”a movement toward the development of a more charismatic and communicative model of leadership [where] focus has shifted to the organization of communication processes and the necessity of including several viewpoints in decision processes and public debates” (Byrkjeflot, 2003). The sixteen humanists proposed that the core of this way of making sense of post-industrial ICT societies could be understood trough the concepts of technology, democracy and academy (Kylhammar & Battail, 2003).

    In agreement with such line of thinking, the point of departure for this study is that a communicative democracy hardly can be generative without a fourth concept, the entrepreneur, which infuses agency to the humanist’s promising but rather structurally oriented conceptualization. The entrepreneurial agency is far from being an unproblematic one, though. As a celebrated form of agency in contemporary societies, to such an extent that the entrepreneur ”stands as a powerful creature capable of summoning the energies of the market society through sheer will power, creating the magic of entrepreneurship” (Rehn & Taalas, 2004), one better think twice about the sort of magic brought in.

    Invited here, with the purpose of empirically describing and theoretically introducing communicative entrepreneurship, is the rough-and-tumble secular magic of sports as entertainment. Guttmann (1978) declared sports being ”among the most discussed and least understood phenomena of our time”, a catchy but relevant slogan for an industry that at one hand generates an intense communicative presence in contemporary societies – “Sporting metaphors saturate everyday language […] sporting expressions pepper political, economic, educational and social discussions” (Booth, 2004) – but on the other hand is in the outskirts of the nowadays so embraced creative industry, as sports was excluded from the formative efforts undertaken by the Knowledge Foundation (KK-stiftelsen) when the Swedish version of the creative industry, the experience industry, was generated via innovative forms of communicative entrepreneurship.

    This tension between the proper and the grotesque is intriguing. Therefore – being a life philosophy for thousands of athletes and millions of their followers, an extremely detailed applied science, a globally omnipresent form of popular culture, a practice that since the rise of Olympism discursively is rooted in religion, and a multibillion dollar industry in which many stakeholders invest and extract their shares – the multidimensional practice of sports and entertainment and its communicative capacity is scrutinized via a close reading methodology termed genealogical storytelling (Hjorth, 2004).

  • 10.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    The discursive formation of 'seriousness' in the ship canal rat race between Panama, Mexico and Nicaragua2017In: Contextualizing entrepreneurship in emerging economies and developing countries / [ed] Marcela Ramírez-Pasilla, Ethel Brundin & Magdalena Markowska, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 105-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In entrepreneurship research, there is lack of in-depth and context-sensitive studies on mega-scale projects: ‘While urban entrepreneurialism and megaprojects have been discussed in academic literature for almost three decades, there are too few case studies which delve into the specific visions guiding these projects, the goals which they are meant to achieve and the positions which different actors play’ (Doucet, 2013: 2035). Given the magnitude of and competition between the existing mega-ship canal in Panama, the planned mega-ship canal project in Nicaragua and the planned port/railway/road/airport project in Mexico, the purpose of this study is to explore how ‘seriousness’ is contextually constructed in the communicative practices of these three cases. For this, I conducted a content analysis (Gioia et al., 2012) of the communicative practices followed for these three cases. The concept of ‘seriousness’ used in this chapter to analyze three cases of mega- and meso-scale entrepreneurship is theorized in scholarly literature on Greek tragedies and is focused on the use and function of the ‘prologue’: A prologue is an introduction to and framing of a story that provides details about the story’s background and its main characters. One crucial feature of a prologue is a quality that Segal (1992: 92-93) labels ‘seriousness and cosmicity’. He defines this quality by saying; ‘To win authority, the prologue must convince us of the seriousness of its contents.’ Furthermore, the prologue must demonstrate a connection between ‘the crisis of the moment and the remote beginnings of all things’ (Segal, 1992: 92-93, in Parsenios, 2010: 46). Applied to this study, the debates and discussions around the three planned canal projects are analyzed as prologues to the (eventual) actualization of the projects, where debaters and discussants try to win authority over the projects by trying to convince their audiences. They do so by emphasizing the seriousness of the project’s content as well as by anchoring the project in remote beginnings and trying to show how these are linked to contemporary tensions and even crises.

  • 11.
    Lundberg, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Bill, Frederic
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    SLU.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Rosell, Erik
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Johnsson, Anna
    Lewis, Amanda
    Nilsson, Linnea
    Meisner, Hampus
    Entreprenöriella landsbygdsenklaver: Föurtsättningar för och mobilisering av entreprenörskap i Urshult2013Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lundberg, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Everyday Practices as Organizing Context for Corporate Entrepreneurship in Family Busninesses2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lundberg, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Ownership Transfer in Small and Medium Sized Firms: A Practice Approach2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lundberg, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Towards a Conceptual Model for Heritagepreneurship and Regional Development2016In: Tourism and Culture in the Age of Innovation / [ed] Katsoni, V; Stratigea, A, Springer, 2016, p. 23-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this text, we present a conceptual model for discussing and analysing what happens when culture, in the form of heritage, and regional development, in the form of entrepreneurship, is juxtaposed (=heritagepreneurship). By comparing case studies from Mexican and South West Scandinavian regions our ambition is to elucidate potentials and limits in different ways of working with regional development using heritage as a mean.

    Our case studies showed that heritage becomes staged, enacted, and perceived in very differing ways depending on the ways memories are embraced, constructed or repressed in the heritagepreneurship process. Different meanings thereby give different societal effects, influencing the heritagepreneurship process.

    The strategies used in these case studies tend to be located “in the extremes”, from unconscious ignorance or a conscious effort to forget, to efforts to provide full attention and an active awareness of what has happened. We believe that more nuanced strategies for more long-term sustainable heritagepreneurship and regional development are located in-between these extremes.

  • 15.
    Lundberg, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Sutherland, Ian
    IEDC-Bled School of Management, Slovenia.
    Blazek, Paul
    RWTH Aachen University, Germany.
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    University of California, USA.
    Habicht, Hagen
    HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management, Germany.
    The emergence of creativity, innovation and leadership in micro-level social interactions and how to research it2014In: International Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, ISSN 2217-2661, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 221-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The moment-to-moment unfolding of innovation, creativity and leadership is complex, non-linear, recursive, largely tacit and influenced by micro-level social interactions. The methodology InnoTracing supported by the software InnoTrace enables insights into the black box of such emergent, situated processes by visualizing what participants regard as their particular ‘moments of significance’ (MOS) as they (according to participants subjective opinion) relate to creativity, leadership, and innovation unfolding in real time. By gathering, aggregating, and analyzing real-time data with a software tool InnoTrace, previously invisible micro-level social interactions are observed. The InnoTracing methodology, a complement to the software InnoTrace, is a further development of ethnomethodological methods, aiming to deal with such user-generated data. This provides a way to study creativity, innovation and leadership processes as they unfold in real time among various actors. This paper explains the InnoTrace software and InnoTracing methodology and presents first data results from one empirical study.

  • 16.
    Lundberg, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Sutherland, Ian
    IEDC Bled Sch Management, Slovenia.
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    Calif State Univ Long Beach, USA.
    Blazek, Paul
    cyLEDGE Media GmbH, Austria.
    Habicht, Hagen
    HHL Leipzig Grad Sch Management, Germany.
    "La Chispa de la Ciudad de Mexico": Co-creation of Organizational Innovations and Its Implications for Managing Innovation2017In: MANAGING COMPLEXITY / [ed] Bellemare, J Carrier, S Nielsen, K Piller, FT, Springer, 2017, p. 287-300Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ramirez Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Uwase, Emilienne
    Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning, Rwanda.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Ibero-American University, Mexico.
    Contextualizing sustainability in water project management: the case of Bugesera District, Rwanda2019In: Efficiency, equity and well-being in selected African countries / [ed] Pia Nilsson & Almas Heshmati, Springer, 2019, p. 277-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores sustainability in water project management following a contextual approach. It relies on an exploratory case study with interviews and field visits to three water project sites in Bugesera district in Rwanda. The results show that water project management includes aspects of social, cultural, environmental and economic sustainability driven by a compliant organization logic. This implies that the water project’s management is steered by existing policies, regulations and procedures. Cultural sustainability in particular is important for capturing contextual practices in the project delivery process, such as Umuganda meetings and committees. Such practices allow the inclusion of the local community by identifying their water needs, defining their benefits and conveying project ownership to them. This study proposes a model following a contextual approach to sustainability in water project management. The model is useful for identifying new contextual/empirical phenomena and for advancing theory. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019.

  • 18.
    Spieth, Patrick
    et al.
    EBS Universität für Wirtschaft und Recht, Germany.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Matzler, Kurt
    Innsbruck University School of Management, Austria.
    Editorial: Business model innovation from an entrepreneurial perspective2014In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 261-265Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Spieth, Patrick
    et al.
    EBS Universität für Wirtschaft und Recht, Germany.
    Lundberg, HansLinnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.Matzler, KurtInnsbruck University School of Management, Austria.
    Special Issue on Business Model Innovation2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Sutherland, Ian
    et al.
    IEDC-Bled School of Management, Slovenia.
    Blazek, Paul
    cyLEDGE Media GmbH, Austria.
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    University of California, USA.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Habicht, Hagen
    HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management, Germany.
    InnoTracing: a Framework to Investigate the Moment-to-Moment Unfolding of Leadership, Creativity and Innovation2014In: Proceedings of the 7th World Conference on Mass Customization, Personalization, and Co-Creation (MCPC 2014), Aalborg, Denmark, February 4th - 7th, 2014: Twenty Years of Mass Customization – Towards New Frontiers / [ed] Thomas D. Brunoe, Kjeld Nielsen, Kaj A. Joergensen & Stig B. Taps, Cham/Heidelberg/New York/Dordrecth/London: Springer, 2014, p. 275-285Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In researching the crucial drivers in innovation processes, it becomes more and more clear that social interactions at a microlevel play an important role when it comes to user innovation. InnoTracing sheds light on understanding what happens in the black box of emergent, situated processes by looking at what participating users regard as their particular “moments of significance” (MOS). The usage of the newly developed software tool InnoTrace allows real-time data gathering, aggregating, and analyzing and works within the methodological concept InnoTracing as fundamental enabler for identifying previously invisible innovation and leadership effects. This software and methodology combination offers researchers and companies the ability to understand how collaboration processes among innovators work and provides valuable insights on how to create a supporting environment.

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