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  • 1. Basden, A
    et al.
    Strijbos, SMirijamdotter, AnitaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Integrating Visions of Technology: Proceedings of the 9th Annual CPTS Working Conference,2007Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bruce, Christine S.
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Demasson, Andrew
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Hughes, Hilary
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Lupton, Mandy
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Sayyad Abdi, Elham
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Maybee, Clarence
    Purdue University, USA.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Information literacy and informed learning: conceptual innovations for IL research and practice futures2017In: Journal of Information Literacy, ISSN 1750-5968, E-ISSN 1750-5968, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 4-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our paper draws together conceptual innovations emerging from the work of a group of researchers focussed on the relational approach to information literacy, more recently labelled ‘informed learning’. Team members have been working together in various configurations for periods ranging from seven to seventeen years. Our collaborative approach continues to yield new concepts and constructs which we believe to be of value to ongoing research and practice. Some of the ideas discussed have been previouly published, while others are being put forward for the first time. All are significant in that they together form new constructs that have emerged from a focus on the relational approach to information literacy. In this paper, Christine Bruce introduces the background to this work and the contributing researchers. Then the individual authors present the key directions which they have developed and are leading, typically working with one or more of the wider network. The key ideas presented are: The expressive window for information literacy (Mandy Lupton); information experience design (Elham Sayyad Abdi); cross-contextuality and experienced identity (Andrew Demasson); informed learning design (Clarence Maybee); spaces for inclusive informed learning (Hilary Hughes); and informed systems (Mary Somerville and Anita Mirjamdotter).  In each piece, authors reflect on what the idea is about, where it came from and what it might mean for research and practice.

  • 3.
    Chatzipanagiotou, Niki
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Library Managers’ Use of Digital Technologies in Everyday Work Practices: An Application of Human Activity Systems Modeling2018In: OR60 Annual Conference, 11-13 Sept. 2018, Lancaster University, Birmingham: The Operational Research Society, 2018, p. 153-153, article id OR60A3507Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As has been argued by systems thinking scholars, science and scientific thinking can be seen as socially constructed systems of institutionalized sets of activities through which systems thinking emerged. In this paper, the development of systems approaches is discussed to argue for the research approach adopted. Further, main concepts of systems thinking such as complexity, worldview, and human activity systems are discussed and applied to empirical data on academic library managers’ use of digital technologies in their everyday work practices. Recognizing that the use of digital technologies has changed the way we live, work and communicate, we explore in depth library managers’ everyday work practices with a focus on the way they use information for managing their organization. Practices refer to what library managers do when they do their job using digital technologies. Their work practices are presented as a complex reality where different managers have different, although interconnected, perspectives and see different priorities. The use of digital technologies is part of library managers’ everyday work practices. However not all managers have the same perspectives on the use of digital technologies. The various interacting perceptions of reality can be explored as different managers have different worldviews that affect their respective approach of managing and of using the technology for that purpose. The Library organization is conceptualized as an information-intensive ecosystem consisting of complex interplays among academic library managers, everyday work practices, digital technologies and content. Within the library system, several human activity systems constructed by managers exist. By the use of Soft Systems Methodology modelling we illustrate some of these existing human activity systems and relate these to purpose and function within the overall organization. Our focus is on information created and mediated within these human activity systems and discuss the means of technology to facilitate managers’ everyday work practices.

  • 4.
    Chronéer, Diana
    et al.
    Division of Industrial Management, Luleå University of Technology.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Systems Thinking Benefits in Supply Change Management: An illustration of the viable systems model in a supply chain2009In: International Journal of Intelligent Systems Technologies and Applications, ISSN 1740-8865, E-ISSN 1740-8873, Vol. 6, no 3/4, p. 227-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing product development models are solely an organisational matter. They do not take into consideration the whole Supply chain (SC) and its different actors. In this article, we investigate how Supply Chain Management and Viable System Model (VSM) can support and create an effective use of information in product development and hence identify critical linkages in the SC. The aim is to introduce VSM as a framework that enables an analysis of companies’ SCs and visualise vital inter-organisational relationships that should be integrated in product development.

  • 5.
    Chronéer, Diana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Runardotter, Mari
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology.
    The Missing Chart and Compass to Open Governance: Research in progress2018In: Presented at SWEG 2018. The 15th Scandinavian Workshop on E-Government / [ed] Normann Andersen, K., Zinner Henriksen, H., Copenhagen, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s society is facing a number of pervasive societal trends such as increased globalization, accelerating urbanisation, a growing knowledge society, stronger individualization, as well as increased variety and pluralism (SOU 2016:89). These phenomena are driven and enabled by the data driven digitalization and new technologies, and taken together they indicate that a digital transformation is ongoing. In the end the digital transformation of the society will influence all, from individuals to nations and globally. It is plausible to say that the digital transformation is unescapable and Janowski (2015) claims that it is clear that governments and policymakers must pay attention to and be ready to govern the digital space since many of the cultural, political, economical and other human activities now occur in the digital space. Sweden aims high, in 2012 the Swedish government appointed Digitaliseringskommissionen the mission to realize the IT policy goal; to become supreme in making use of all the possibilities that digitalization brings along. Digitaliseringskommissionen states that Sweden is strong in areas such as infrastructure, human capital and use of the Internet, and have many ICT specialists, but Sweden is weak when it comes to digitalizing the public sphere; there is lack of co-ordination of administrations (finding common solutions) and open data (SOU 2016:89).

  • 6.
    Deiters, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Fraunhofer ISST, Dortmund, Germany.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Sandkuhl, Kurt
    Jönköping University.
    ILOG 2010 Workshop Chairs’ Message2010In: BIS 2010 International Workshops, Berlin, Germany, May 3-5, 2010. Revised Papers / [ed] Abramowicz, W., Tolksdorf, R., and Węcel, K., New York: Springer, 2010, p. 156-157Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For many enterprises, it is of decisive strategic importance to optimize the internal information flow and to implement an efficient reuse of existing knowledge. Especially in knowledge-intensive industry and service sectors, information is a major factor in production processes, and knowledge reflects an important asset of the enterprise. Similarly, public organizations and governmental bodies are dependent on accurate and timely information supply for efficient and high quality processes and services. Intelligent information supply has become an important issue that is characterized by just-in-time, demand-oriented and context-sensitive information.

  • 7.
    Elm, Patrik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Iqbal, Sarfraz
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Exploring threshold concept when teaching Systems Thinking and Soft Systems Methodology2018In: OR60 Annual Conference, 11-13 Sept. 2018, Lancaster University, Birmingham: The Operational Research Society, Birmingham, UK: The Operational Research Society , 2018, p. 202-202, article id OR60A3581Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been argued that the threshold concepts of a discipline are the gateways to a deeper understanding of disciplinary knowledge. These are also keys to improving student learning outcomes and progressive learning. Research has been done on systems as a threshold concept for understanding other disciplinary issues, like sustainability. However, we explore the threshold concepts of understanding systems itself, that is, in this case the disciplinary framework of systems thinking and Soft Systems Methodology. The term threshold concept is stated as having emerged from the UK project Enhancing Teaching and Learning Environments in Undergraduate Courses. It is argued to be a means leading to a transformed way of understanding or learning. Five key characteristics of threshold concepts have been identified in previous research. These are troublesome knowledge, transformation, irreversibility, integration, and boundedness. Later on, reconstitution, discourse and liminality were added.

    We have explored threshold concepts for teaching systems thinking and Soft Systems Methodology in a mixed knowledge environment, including students from different disciplines, in a developing country. The students were presented with an issue related to their everyday life as university students and with the aim of applying systems thinking ideas and techniques for the betterment of their university and, in the long run, their society. They were also asked to write a reflection paper related to the learning objectives of the course and on what they have learnt about Soft Systems Methodology (theory) and when applied to the specific case. We report on which pertinent threshold concepts we have identified, both of our own experience as teachers and of the students’ reflection papers.

  • 8.
    Finken, Sisse
    et al.
    IT University, Copenhagen.
    Mörtberg, ChristinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.Mirijamdotter, AnitaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Dilemmas 2015 Papers from the 18th Annual International Conference Dilemmas for Human Services: Organizing, Designing and Managing2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 18th annual International Research Conference ‘Dilemmas for Human Services’ and the preliminary Doctoral Consortium took place at Linnaeus University and Teleborg castle in Växjo, Sweden, during September 9th–11th 2015. The conference was organized as a joint effort between Linnaeus University, Växjö, and University of Linköping.

    The Dilemmas conference dates back to 1995. It was formed, and is maintained, by scholars at Staffordshire University, University of East London, and Luleå University of Technology. Generally, Dilemmas stimulates critical analysis and reflections, and encourages more careful considerations about dominant ideas and notions relevant for human services. With this, Dilemmas nurtures meetings between established and new coming scholars where policy, organizational, management and sociological issues relating to human services can be considered. The research topics relevant to such span areas of e.g. health, social services, housing and education. 

     

  • 9.
    Gibney, Michele
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. University of the Pacific, USA.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Pireva Nuci, Krenare
    Unniversity for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Evolution of a Course: Instructional Design Elements and Impacts2018In: UBT International Conference, UBT Knowledge Center , 2018, article id 125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 2017 Spring semester, international educators from Sweden and the United States collaborated on delivery of an Information Systems, Analysis, Design and Modeling graduate course at the University for Business and Technology (UBT) in Kosovo. In the Spring of 2018, the team taught course was offered a second time, with both graduate and undergraduate students. In the first year, student work focused on the conceptual design of a UBT Knowledge Center ecosystem, using Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) co-design tools. The Spring 2018 course built upon and expanded this work through more granular exploration of possible local systems designs for making local knowledge discoverable, employing SSM and emphasizing Informed Learning to foster an enriched exploration of the topic. Differences between the pedagogical course design and student experience reflections will be explored in this paper to highlight the impact of ‘flipped classroom’ teaching and cross- disciplinary/cross-degree group work, within the larger context of systems thinking educational efficacy.

  • 10.
    Golshan, Behrooz
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Digital Capability for Practice: Implications of Appreciative Systems Model on Analysing Organisational Strategies2018In: OR60 Annual Conference, 11-13 Sept. 2018, Lancaster University, Birmingham: The Operational Research Society , 2018, p. 215-215, article id OR60A3482Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT-enabled innovations continually disrupt logics of value, competition and organisation in a growing number of industries. Increasingly, value is created, delivered and captured in complex cross-industry value networks through which external resources and capabilities are accessed. Accordingly, strategic intentions for interorganisational collaborations have become an integral part of the overall strategic framework for firms operating in such environments.

    Driving from the Appreciative Systems Model, Digital capability and Strategy as Practice perspectives, the proposed model illustrates how and why strategic decisions are made and sustained in complex digitalised environments. That is, events and ideas such as technological change, competition, business trends or internal shortcomings leads to formulation of strategic intentions that are validated by the organisational digital capability. The action phase that follows might involve business model reconfiguration and investments in new IS competencies. Lessons learnt during such cycle adding to the newly acquired IS competencies reinforces the organisational digital capability, which elevates the standards used for formulating future appreciations. 

    In line with the emerging literature on the concept of digital capability, the proposed framework accounts for the two-way relationship between IS/IT and organisational strategies. That is, previous investments in IS/IT functions affect standards and perceptions of events and ideas, which lead to changed appreciations. The action phase that follows might include investments in new IS/IT functions which in turn affect the future cycles. The concepts of appreciation and action also comply with the notions of strategy as intended (appreciation) verses strategy as executed (action), and how both of them affect future cycles.

  • 11.
    Golshan, Behrooz
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Methodological Inefficiencies for Investigating Digital Strategy: Application of Appreciative Systems Models for Longitudinal Studies2019In: The OR Society Annual Conference OR61, 3-5 September 2019, Sibson Building, Kent University: Conference Handbook, The Operational Research Society , 2019, p. 157-158, article id OR61A89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic Information Systems research has faced a significant methodological shortcoming in the recent decades. That is, while scholars appreciate the systemic nature of implications of digital technologies on operational and competitive environments, and the two-way relationship between investments in digital technologies and strategic moves, mainstream analytical approaches fail to grasp such systemic and bidirectional relationships. Consequently, cumulative research does not provide comprehensive contextualising and theorising the implications of emerging digital technologies on digital transformation of organizations, markets and industries. Investigating the process of digital transformation in an insurance company through the lenses of the Appreciative Systems Models for over eight years, we believe that the model can serve as the philosophical underpinning to devise new analytical models for investigating strategic information systems in a holistic perspective.

    The model starts with two stranded ropes that depict the constant flux of events and ideas in the day-to-day life. Actors perceptions of such events and ideas could lead to interventions, or actions, that are justified through judgments and standers. The key point here is that both appreciations and actions affect not only the future flux of events and ideas, but also standards and values that future appreciations would be judged against. In the contexts of digital transformation, the flux of events and ideas represents technological innovations, disruptions and other emerging factors that shape the operational and competitive environments. Appreciations represent strategic intents that are formed by the managements perceptions and judged by the firms experience in acquiring and levering digital technologies. Actions represent business model reconfigurations in order to execute strategic intents. Using this model to develop a timeline based on each time that the organization undergo a change process, could help scholars, and practitioners alike, better understand emerging strategic intentions against the organizational technological and strategic know-how.

  • 12.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    A Review of Information Logistics Research Publications2011In: Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348, E-ISSN 1865-1356, Vol. 97, p. 244-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information Logistics’ has presented itself as an intellectual and professional domain addressing the question of timely providence of the right information. A question that emerges then is: What is Information Logistics? To answer this question, a comprehensive review of research publications was conducted, where ‘Information Logistics’ was featured in the publication title. A detailed analysis of the content of these publications identified eleven different research directions, where five are currently active, all in Europe. Among various findings, the results show that these research directions have been pursued independently of each other, addressing different kinds of research questions and contexts, utilising different research approaches, and therefore generating a variety of unrelated research results. All the reviewed research here shows that there are numerous unmet empirical needs in our human and social affairs, as well as a need for intra-disciplinary developments, which calls for a joint mobilisation of the research efforts.

  • 13.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Stockholm University, School of Business.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Information Logistics as a Guide for 
Research and Practice of e-Maintenance Operations2011In: International Journal of Performability Engineering, ISSN 0973-1318, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 593-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the development of e-maintenance operations is understood to offer promising opportunities, it seems to be mainly driven by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) applications development. This is unfortunate, as ICT has no value in itself; rather its benefit comes from the way in which it is utilized within its particular context. Thus, a conceptual framework is proposed to guide both the practice and the research of e-maintenance operations. The framework combines an Industrial Value Chain with a Buyer- Consumer Value Chain, where their intersections articulated in terms of categories derived from Information Logistics. This provides a structure for the conception of e-maintenance that needs to be populated with published research and current e-maintenance practice. This may uncover white spaces where research efforts deserve particular attention and are driven by value generation – for instance, economic. A brief case study, from a leading European truck- manufacturer, illustrates the proposed conceptual framework in application.

  • 14.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Research and Practice Agenda of Industrial e-Maintenance: Information Logistics as a Driver for Development2010In: Proceedings of the 1st International Congress on eMaintenance / [ed] Uday Kumar; Ramin Karim; Aditya Parida, Luleå, 2010, p. 56-61Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an inquiry into the domain of e-maintenance, particularly of industrial entities. As a domain of research and practice, e-maintenance is understood to offer great opportunities, however it seems to be driven by the development of applications of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). This ICT-driven approach is unfortunate, as ICT has no value in itself, rather its benefit comes for how it processes information, and more broadly how it forms its contextual activities. To remedy this situation, a conceptual framework is proposed, to guide both the practice and the research of e-maintenance operations. This framework combines the seminal Industrial Value Chain framework and then the Buyer-Consumer Value Chain, and articulates their intersection with a set of defined categories derived from Information Logistics. This provides one possible structure for the conception of e-maintenance, which needs to be populated with the published research and practice results. This, in turn, may uncover white spaces where research efforts deserve particular attention and are driven by value generation – whether economic or other – instead of experimental ICT application developments. The presentation of this framework is accompanied with a brief example that contrasts an event-driven versus a plan-driven approach to e-maintenance.

  • 15.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Hellgren, Magnus
    Centre for Information Logistics, Ljungby, Sweden.
    Rosvall, Jan
    Chalmers University of Technology & University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    An Information Logistics Research Program2010In: Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation, Reading Academic Publishing Limited , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our human and social affairs operate inherently various modes of information sharing; in this we frequently encounter instances where the needed information is not provided to the needing actor, at the right time and cost, and in the right format. To this end, an Information Logistics Research Program has been formulated, grounded both in current research findings and in the actual needs and opportunities of organizations and individuals. The aim of the program is to guide a long term and comprehensive research efforts by indicating the key research domains to be addressed. The formulated research program proposes the following four key research frontiers for Information Logistics: the Information Logistics Operational Models, the Information Logistics Business Models, the Information Needing Actor, and the Information Logistics Foundations. The proposed Research Program also provides suggestions for how to research the defined frontiers.

  • 16.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, AnitaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings: Theory and Framework (Festschrift in honor of Gunilla Bradley)2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings: Theory and Framework addresses the extensive area of effects of ICT on human beings and the interaction between ICT, individuals, organizations, and society. This premier reference source features contributions from over 45 distinguished researchers from around the world, each presenting high quality research on social informatics, human computer interaction, organizational behavior, and macro-ergonomics. This unique publication is perfect for students, teachers, researchers, engineers, practitioners, managers, policy-makers, and media alike.

  • 17.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Ten Guidelines for the Implementation of Information Systems: Research in Progress2008In: Proceedings of the 31th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 31:: Public systems in the future – possibilities, challenges and pitfalls / [ed] Asproth, V., Axelsson, K., Holmberg, S.C., Ihlström, C., Lindblad-Gidlund, K., and Sundgren, B, Åre, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a Model for Implementation of Information Systems (IS). Its focusis on the organizational aspects of an IS implementation, where the objective is tosecure that the to-be IS users will use the to-be IS; hence hardware, software, andother aspects of the information technology itself are not accounted by this model.The key challenge addressed here is the many reported failures of IS implementationas derived from the organizational challenges rather than purely informationtechnology. The proposed model is built on the so-called Organization InformationSystem paradigm that regards an organization and its IS as one conceptual unitrather than considering the IS as an adjunct to the organization – the latter typical forthe conventional Management Information System paradigm. Therefore, the ISimplementation is contextualised within a process for the development oforganizations, and proposes the “Effect-Behaviour-Resource-Influence Loop” as amechanism of change, of the changed organization. In this, it is the influence of theresources – human and machines – that changes the behaviour that in turn leads tothe change of effects, toward the desired state. Further, the proposed Model forInformation System Implementation provides also three needs of an organization tobe subjected of an IS intervention; these are the “change Motivation”, the “changeCapability”, and the “change Ability”. The proposed model is an outcome of a set ofcase studies of IS implementation, conducted in an Action Research mode, andinformed by selected theoretical bodies as well as the empirical challenge tosuccessfully implement an IS. The key contribution of this model is its empiricalexperience and its comprehensive approach to an IS implementation, rather than ananalytical focusing on a few variables only. However, the proposed model is still in itshypothetical phase of theory development, and is in a need of both further crossfertilisationwith various theoretical bodies as well as further empirical experience,where validations and modifications are made.

  • 18.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    In Search for Unity within the Diversity of Information Societies2011In: Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings: Theory and Framework (Festschrift in honor of Gunilla Bradley) / [ed] Darek M. Haftor; Anita Mirijamdotter, Hershey, New York: IGI Global, 2011, p. 540-546Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This final Chapter represents the responsibility, the privilege but also the aspiration of the two editors of this Gunilla Bradley Festschrift. The aspiration here is no less than to identify a key message that emerges out of the contributions in this volume considered as a whole. In other words, the question here is: what do all this research and reasoning say to us? Of course, each reader of this Volume will derive her or his own interpretation and thus also a key message, which we only see as the richness offered by this Festschrift. Therefore, the key message presented here must be regarded only as one possible message that is formed by the two editors’ own predispositions: intellectual, cultural, motivational, and other.

  • 19.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics. Stockholm University.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    In Search for Unity within the Diversity of Information Societies: Linnaeus University Celebrates a Pioneer: Professor Gunilla Bradley2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Hajrizi, Edmond
    et al.
    University for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    University for Business and Technology University Libraries and Knowledge Center: A Concept Paper2017In: 8th International Conference Information Systems and Technology Innovations, Tirana, Albania, June 23-24, 2017.: Fostering the As-A-Service Economy / [ed] Sevrani, Kozeta, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most significant innovation enables the realization of far greater human potential. The catalyst of such creativity in higher education is the acquisition of new knowledge and the living of new experiences. Then, within innovation and incubation environments, new thinking enriches knowledge handed down from previous generations, enlivens contemporary lives and informs future growth. Emergent knowledge encourages recognition of the limitations of traditional academic disciplines, exploration of new interdisciplinary frontiers, and, from this, novel transdisciplinary insights that unlock human potential and improve human conditions.

    In response, the University for Business and Technology intends to build collaboration environments to enable discovery and access, interpretation and analysis, creation and sharing of knowledge. These aspirations recognize the synergies possible when individual discovery is reinforced by collective inquiry with the shared purpose of using information to learn to create knowledge together. Further, this UBT planning initiative acknowledges that societal progress, whether local or global, ultimately depends on catalyzing, fortifying, and affirming human inquiry. So enabling environments will place humans at the center of the knowledge creation spaces and places that aim to advance participant capabilities to meet the demands of working in a global marketplace and living in a global society.

  • 21.
    Hajrizi, Edmond
    et al.
    University for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The UBT Knowledge Center: A Collaborative Design Approach2017In: Proceedings UBT 6th Annual International Conference 27-29 october, 2017: International Conference on Education and Development & Psychology Sciences / [ed] Hajrizi, E., UBT Higher Education Institution , 2017, p. 5-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In setting the institutional vision for University for Business and Technology in 2001,founder Dr. Edmond Hajrizi sought to educate Kosovo students to become active contributors tothe society and in the workplace, within the country, the Balkans region, and beyond. The UBTKnowledge Center initiative extends the founding vision of national development through highereducation. Since local knowledge, identity, and learning are necessarily situated, Kosovarstudents, faculty, staff, and administrators serve as topical experts and international educatorsfrom Sweden and the United States serve as design facilitators for this collaborative project. Thispaper presents the vision for and concept of the Knowledge Center, followed by reflections onthe process so far and anticipated future actions.

  • 22.
    Hajrizi, Edmond
    et al.
    University for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The UBT Knowledge Center: A Collaborative Design Approach2017In: International Journal of Business and Technology, ISSN 2223-8387, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In setting the institutional vision for University for Business and Technology in 2001, founder Dr. Edmond Hajrizi sought to educate Kosovo students to become active contributors to the society and in the workplace, within the country, the Balkans region, and beyond. The UBT Knowledge Center initiative extends the founding vision of national development through higher education. Since local knowledge, identity, and learning are necessarily situated, Kosovar students, faculty, staff, and administrators serve as topical experts and international educators from Sweden and the United States serve as design facilitators. Participatory design commenced in April 2017 when international faculty from Sweden and the United States co-taught a graduate level course, Information Systems Analysis, Design, and Modelling, at the Pristina campus. Working with UBT administrators, directors, managers, and librarians, students worked in teams to co-design three essential parts of a holistic Knowledge Center ecosystem: a digital environment to advance local knowledge visibility, an organizational environment to enhance boundary crossing collaboration, and a digital academic library environment to enable discovery of and access to published academic scholarship. Following these ‘learn by doing’ instructional activities, exploratory knowledge management discussions produced a Knowledge Center concept paper in July 2017, with funding from the Fulbright Specialist Program. The white paper recognizes the social context of learning – that knowledge is acquired and understood through action, interaction, and sharing with others. It thereby anticipates the social relationships necessary for information exchange and knowledge creation, oftentimes enabled by technology, for knowledge incubation in the university and beyond. This collaborative design approach anticipates continuing to convene multidisciplinary conversations and to integrate interdisciplinary coursework into realization of the University’s founding knowledge vision which recognizes the critical importance of developing new and more complex ways for connecting people, information, and technology in the university and with the society. In response, the UBT Knowledge Center aims to foster knowledge creation which curates and preserves intellectual, cultural, national, and regional resources for future generations.

  • 23. Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    An application of Ba: Deconstructing formative processes in multdisciplinary work groups2005In: International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, ISSN 1447-9524, E-ISSN 1447-9575, Vol. 4, p. 1051-1059Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Framing Multi-Disciplinary Teams: Sense Making Through the POM-Model2006In: Integrating Visions of Technology: Proceedings of the 9th Annual CPTS Working Conference / [ed] Basden, A., Mirijamdotter, M., and Strijbos, S., Maarssden, The Netherlands, 2006, p. 111-140Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Jansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Runardotter, Mari
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Participatory Design: in Need of Angels2010In: Travelling Thoughtfulness: feminist technoscience stories / [ed] P. Elovaara, J. Sefyrin, M.B. Öhman, and C. Björkman, Umeå, Sweden: Umeå University , 2010, p. 115-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a sentence by Bob Dylan – the times they are a-changin’. This is true also for participatory design (PD) – today design projects are distributed between sites and people, and extended in time. PD is now diverse and multi-directional and in need of re-thinking designer responsibility. How to change our methods in line with concerned personnel’s abilities and ways of expressing themselves? Yet, still it is needed someone that overlooks and ensure the PD process. This is especially important when a PD project results in new experiences for people. We suggest that systems designers’ shoulder the responsibility as an angel, which we use as a metaphor for a person with the overall responsibility for the PD process. As part of this we suggest that systems designers would gain by adapting the PD process in line with the PAR methodology and by the use of Soft Systems Methodology’s Rich Picture building.

     

  • 26.
    Jansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Participation in e-Home Healthcare @ North Calotte2008In: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2008: Building Bridges / [ed] Gulz, A., Magnusson, C., Malmborg, L., Eftring, H., Jönsson, B., and Tollmar, K., Association for Computing Machinery , 2008, p. 192-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation and the contribution of participatory design methods and techniques are explored in the context of a Scandinavian Home Healthcare project. The project was undertaken during 2004-2005. Its aim was to introduce mobile ICT equipment to health care workers in order to improve planning, including quality and precision of information exchange. The study was designed according to Participatory Action Research and Participatory Design principles. Methods employed in the project were observations, interviews, future workshops, and story boards to actively involve different stakeholders. The experience of the project indicates that, although the rhetoric was that of a participatory design and research project, participants are not equally regarded in terms of experiences and knowledge of the actual practice. Assumptions about technology influence development and implementation at the expense of the actual care activity. Further, participation and participatory design techniques used in the project demonstrate the complexity of home healthcare and the necessity to involve all the different occupational groups involved in the care of the client. However, organisational boundaries reinforced shortcomings in cross-functional and cross organisational cooperation. A final conclusion is that time for collaborative and collegial reflections is a necessity to support the learning process.

  • 27. Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    Karim, Ramin
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Essential Components of eMaintenance2011In: International Journal of Performability Engineering, ISSN 0973-1318, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 555-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many intellectual, societal, business and technological forces are continuously pushing forward the frontiers of science. When combined, they provide an umbrella for generating new fields and exploring new grounds. One such a new field is e-Maintenance. e-Maintenance addresses new needs and provides various benefits in form of increased availability, reduced lifecycle cost and increased customer value. However, it suffers from lack of a commonly defined basis supporting the existence of e-Maintenance and determining the essential components inherent in the e-Maintenance domain. In this paper, we suggest an initial set of components that serve as the groundwork of the e-Maintenance universe. The set outlines ten initial components. These are definition, business,organization, product, service, methodology, technology, information, customer, and education and training. The paper also suggests a definition of e-Maintenance, places e-Maintenance in the context of other e-Domains, and elicits e-Maintenance intellectual opportunities and challenges to be met by both the academia and industry.

  • 28. Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    Karim, Ramin
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Fundamentals of the eMaintenance Concept2010In: Proceedings of the 1st International Congress on eMaintenance / [ed] Kumar, U., Karim, R., and Parida, A., Luleå, Sweden: Luleå University of Technology , 2010, p. 147-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many intellectual, societal, business and technological forces are continuously pushing forward the frontiers of science. When being effectively combined, they may provide an umbrella for generating new fields and exploring new grounds.  One such emerging field is eMaintenance. It is based on the fields from operation & maintenance engineering, software engineering, information systems, business management, and many other strongly varying fields related to the application domains of eMaintenance. As a novel field, eMaintenance addresses new needs and provides various benefits in form of increased availability, reduced lifecycle cost and increased customer-value. On the other hand, being in a continuous flux, it suffers from many infant illnesses in form of lack of or fuzzy definitions and theoretical foundations. This paper constitutes the first call to the eMaintenance community to gather their forces and commonly define the eMaintenance concept. As an initial step, it outlines its ten essential components. These are (1) Definition, (2) Business, (3) Organization, (4) Product, (5) Service, (6) Methodology, (7) Technology, (8) Information, (9) Customer, and (10) Education and Training.  The paper also suggests a timeless definition of eMaintenance, it places eMaintenance in the context of other eDomains, and it elicits eMaintenance intellectual opportunities and challenges to be met by both the academia and industry when researching on or transitioning to the eMaintenance mode.

  • 29.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Information Inadequacy: Some Causes of Failures in Human and Social Affairs2011In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation, ISSN 1566-6379, E-ISSN 1566-6379, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes initial steps in facilitating researchers and practitioners to increase the relevance of information for their contexts. Our focus is on forging new possibilities to understand and improve the contemporary dilemma of information inadequacy. We define information inadequacy as vulnerable and inadequate information, composed by the dichotomy of information lack and/or of information overflow, which impose complexities and unexpected behaviour in human and social affairs. By exploring the lack of needed information in human and social affairs, we conducted an inquiry of different empirical and research objects that relate to information inadequacy (for example, empirical situations, theories, or other theoretically and practically based artifacts). The question that emerges then is: How to secure that the needed information is provided to the recipient at the right time, reducing the cause of unpredictable failures and fatalities in our global society? To answer this question, our paper presents initial guiding with a systematic approach that focuses on evaluating and further improving research and practice for information relevance. The empirical cases are mostly based on situations, such as: the financial failures of the Lehman Brothers Bankruptcy 2008, and the Enron bankruptcy 2001; or the disasters of the Space Shuttle Columbia 2003, and Space Shuttle Challenger 1986. The analyses are examined using theories of information behaviour that influence communication processes, from where two or more different actors are necessary to engage in activities of information exchange. The results include the identification of four information exchange patterns: influenced, intentional, hindered, unawares. Furthermore, we discuss implications of the model for practices with information. The paper concludes by challenging the role of information inadequacy in all economic, social and political affairs that remains problematic.

  • 30.
    Koczkas, Andreas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Aidemark, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Integrating Viable Systems Model and Knowledge Creation Systems2014In: OLKC, Theme: Circuits of knowledge, 22-24 April 2014, Oslo / [ed] Jaabæk, M. and Gjengstø, H., Oslo, Norway: BI Norwegian Business School , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the different logics of learning organization and a traditional command a control organization. A system that targets a learning process will also have to fit into the broader situation of that organization. The approach to this analysis is to compare the models for the different fields, in this case a VSM model of effective organizational maintain and control with the theory of “the knowledge creating company”. The outcome of this analysis outlines a number of perspectives where these two logics interacts and sometime collide. The conclusion is that a KM support tool/process not only have to fit into the learning and change process but also into the broader maintain and control systems of a company. 

  • 31.
    Kurti, Erdelina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Can Kuhn’s conception of paradigm shift explain the digital transformation of business models?2016In: Information Systems and Technology Innovations: the New Paradigm for a Smarter Economy, Department of Statistics and Applied Informatics Faculty of Economy, University of Tirana , 2016, p. 91-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we adopt Thomas Kuhn’s perspective of scientific progress, to discuss whether digitalization and specifically digital transformation of business models represents a shift to a new paradigm. We argue that digital operations and artefacts manifest some inherent characteristics, that significantly differ from traditional business models. Whereas the latter logics operates according to the conventional economic rules, the digital realm function according to the economics of digital information that involves some inherent unique features such as the importance of network effects, negligible marginal costs, different pricing mechanisms, reduction of transaction costs and different revenue models. These features make digital information products difficult to translate and address in economic terms. Thus, a new set of assumptions is required, because the production, distribution and consumption of digital information products encompasses a distinct inherent logic.

  • 32. Köhler, V
    et al.
    Söderhamn, O
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    People, Technology and Work Practices: understanding the processes of sensemaking when using IT in a nursing context2005In: The 16th Australasian Conference on Information Systems: People, Technology and Work Practices, Sydney, Australien, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    On System Thinking and Information Security2019In: The OR Society Annual Conference OR61, 3-5 September 2019, Sibson Building, Kent University: Conference Handbook, The Operational Research Society , 2019, p. 161-162, article id OR61A151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Security problems we have to deal with today regarding Internet are created by ourselves. Internet, initially created to handle US Government data traffic, evolved to become communication between different research institutes. The protocols that were used had no security at all. Today we still use this network to almost everything and the complexity has grown tremendously. Compared to when the network initially was created, we now try to protect assets rather than just communicate, divide users according to permission and accessibility, and deal with privacy issues. Basically, everything is depending on the network that initially was created with no security.

    Privacy has been a critical security aspect for the EU, but with the event of the GDPR privacy is both a legal aspect and an auditable ICT concept. GDPR includes topics like: owning your own data, independent of who collected it and where it is stored, and; the right to be forgotten. Each data collector also needs to have a complete data-flow map, describing any privacy data sets in a flow, to make these traceable and ready for audit inspection. Any organization handling EU residents’ data, needs to adhere to proactive Information Security processes. 

    GDPR is based on the principles of Governance, Risk, and Compliance. It is not a purely legal construct; it is a management and strategy issue, not an IT issue. Further examples relate to cloud services with distributed resources, which illustrate the complex problem situation.

    There is a need for a new perspective, moving from systems management to data flow management. We propose a systemic model which illustrate processes and flows within a fractal structure; we build on Beer’s Viable System Model. Such a model enables mapping of complexity and data flows and provide a tool for auditing and, thus, enable meeting the requirements of GDPR.

  • 34.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. Tieto Public.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Towards Secure Data Flow Oriented Multi-Vendor IT Governance Models2017In: UBT 6th Annual International Conference 2017: Leadership and Innovation / [ed] Hajrizi, E., 2017, p. 163-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, still, ICT Governance is being regarded as a departmental concern, not an overall organizational concern. History has shown us that implementation strategies, which are based on departments, results in fractional implementations leading to ad hoc solutions with no central control and stagnation for the in-house ICT strategy. Further, this recently has created an opinion trend; many are talking about the ICT department as being redundant, a dying out breed, which should be replaced by on-demand specialized external services. Clearly, the evermore changing surroundings do force organizations to accelerate the pace of new adaptations within their ICTplans, more vivacious than most organizations currently is able to. This leads to that ICT departments tend to be reactive rather than acting proactively and take the lead in the increased transformation pace in which organizations find themselves. Simultaneously, the monolithic systems of the 1980ies/1990ies is often very dominating in an organization, consume too much of the yearly IT budget, leaving healthy system development behind. These systems were designed before data became an organizational all-encompassing resource; the systems were designed more or less in isolation in regards to the surrounding environment. These solutions make data sharing costly and not at all optimal. Additionally, in strives to adapt to the organization’s evolution, the initial architecture has become disrupted and built up in shreds. Adding to this, on May 25, 2018, an upgraded EU Privacy Regulation on General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will be activated. This upgraded privacy regulation includes a substantial strengthening of 1994’s data privacy regulation, which will profoundly affect EU organizations. This regulation will, among other things, limit the right to collect and process personal data and will give the data subject all rights to his/her data sets, independentof where this data is/has been collected and by whom. Such regulation force data collecting and processingorganizations to have total control over any personal data collected and processed. This includes detailedunderstanding of data flows, including who did what and when and under who’s authorization, and how data istransported and stored. Concerning data/information flows, maps are a mandatory part of the system documentation. Thisencompasses all systems, including outsourced such as cloud services.Hence, individual departments cannot any longer claim they “own” data. Further, since mid-2000, we have seen aglobal inter-organizational data integration, independent of organizations, public or private. If this integration ceasesto exist, the result will be a threat to the survival of the organization. Additionally, if the organization fails to providea transparent documentation according to the GDPR, substantial economic risk is at stake. So, the discussion aboutthe ICT departments’ demise is inapt. Anyorganizational change will require costly and time-consuming ICTdevelopment efforts to adapt to the legislation of today’s situation. Further, since data nowadays is interconnectedand transformed at all levels, interacting at multiple intersections all over the organization, and becoming a unifiedbase of all operative decisions, an ICT governance model for the organization is require

  • 35.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. Tieto Public.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Towards secure data flow oriented multi-vendor IT governance models2018In: International Journal of Business and Technology, ISSN 2223-8387, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1-9, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, still, ICT Governance is being regarded as a departmental concern, not an overall organizational concern. History has shown us that implementation strategies, which are based on departments, results in fractional implementations leading to ad hoc solutions with no central control and stagnation for the in-house ICT strategy. Further, this recently has created an opinion trend; many are talking about the ICT department as being redundant, a dying out breed, which should be replaced by on-demand specialized external services. Clearly, the evermore changing surroundings do force organizations to accelerate the pace of new adaptations within their ICT plans, more vivacious than most organizations currently is able to. This leads to that ICT departments tend to be reactive rather than acting proactively and take the lead in the increased transformation pace in which organizations find themselves. Simultaneously, the monolithic systems of the 1980ies/1990ies is often very dominating in an organization, consume too much of the yearly IT budget, leaving healthy system development behind. These systems were designed before data became an organizational all-encompassing resource; the systems were designed more or less in isolation in regards to the surrounding environment. These solutions make data sharing costly and not at all optimal. Additionally, in strives to adapt to the organization’s evolution, the initial architecture has become disrupted and built up in shreds. Adding to this, on May 25, 2018, an upgraded EU Privacy Regulation on General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will be activated. This upgraded privacy regulation includes a substantial strengthening of 1994’s data privacy regulation, which will profoundly affect EU organizations. This regulation will, among other things, limit the right to collect and process personal data and will give the data subject all rights to his/her data sets, independentof where this data is/has been collected and by whom. Such regulation force data collecting and processingorganizations to have total control over any personal data collected and processed. This includes detailedunderstanding of data flows, including who did what and when and under who’s authorization, and how data istransported and stored. Concerning data/information flows, maps are a mandatory part of the system documentation. This encompasses all systems, including outsourced such as cloud services. Hence, individual departments cannot any longer claim they “own” data. Further, since mid-2000, we have seen aglobal inter-organizational data integration, independent of organizations, public or private. If this integration ceasesto exist, the result will be a threat to the survival of the organization. Additionally, if the organization fails to providea transparent documentation according to the GDPR, substantial economic risk is at stake. So, the discussion aboutthe ICT departments’ demise is inapt. Any organizational change will require costly and time-consuming ICTdevelopment efforts to adapt to the legislation of today’s situation. Further, since data nowadays is interconnectedand transformed at all levels, interacting at multiple intersections all over the organization, and becoming a unifiedbase of all operative decisions, an ICT governance model for the organization is required.

  • 36.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Bridging the gap between users and systems –: the potential contribution of Social Informatics to Evidence Based Library and Information Practice2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP) is concerned with asking the right questions and obtaining relevant evidence. According to the linear process of EBLIP, the evidence is then reviewed and, if judged promising, applied. Finally, the impact of application is assessed and evaluated in relation to the problem that prompted the question and started the whole process.

    Social informatics, on the other hand, is focused on studying the use of information and communication technology (ICT), something that the EBLIP process heavily relies on. However, the purpose of studying ICT use is design oriented, i.e., to improve the design of systems and products. In this context, methodological aspects of finding out, modelling, assessing and evaluating becomes a main concern for the design, as well as conceptualising ICT systems as part of organisational processes.

    To bridge the gap between users and systems, the design methodology needs to be interactive and participative in nature. Further, it needs to include techniques for explicating different stakeholder perspectives, which, when explored, may raise critical and ethical issues. Such a methodology has been combined with the EBLIP process of posing questions, gathering evidence, assessing alternatives, valuing, and deciding on actions to later be evaluated.

    The interactive and participatory EBLIP approach has been applied in three university library organisations, in Scandinavia and in the U.S. The main idea was to gather as rich evidence as possible to enable new ways of understanding and by that open up new possibilities for improving the situation. Evidence is here interpreted in broader terms than in its medical model counterpart. This keynote will report on the latest application.

    The conclusion so far, a fruitful way forward for professional development is posing open questions, learning from various perspectives, evaluating frame of references, and use systems thinking.

  • 37.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Information Logistics Research: Review and Definition of Program2010In: Proceedings of the 1st International Congress on eMaintenance, Luleå, Sweden, 22th-24th June., 2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    IS Analysis, Design and Modeling: Information Systems Master Program, Academic Year 2016/20172017Data set
  • 39.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Managing the complexity – systems thinking2018In: Presented at IC-ISS2018, 7th International Conference on Information Systems and Security, Pristina, Kosovo, October 26-28, 2018 / [ed] Hajrizi, E., 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Toward a user-centered I2-Enabled Collaborative Learning and Teaching Environment: The Cal Poly Scandinavian Style Participatory Design Project2005Other (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Toward  Collaborative  Evidence  Based  Information Practices: Organisation and Leaderhip Essentials2010In: Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, ISSN 1715-720X, E-ISSN 1715-720X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary is based on my key note for the EBLIP conference held in 2009 in Stockholm, Sweden. The title was: Bridging the gap between users and systems – the potential contribution of Social Informatics to Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. In the following commentary, I focus on the application of social informatics principles to develop a collaborative evidence based approach grounded in shared workplace leadership. My remarks highlight some main contributions from the field of library and information science and social informatics and conclude with implications for practice, including further research.

  • 42.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Basden, AStrijbos, S
    Integrating Visions of Technology: Proceedings of the 9th Annual CPTS Working Conference2006Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, B
    An appreciative critique and refinement of Checkland’s Soft Systems Methodology2006In: In Search of an Integrative Vision of Technology / [ed] Strijbos, S. and Basden, A., New York: Springer , 2006, p. 79-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Haftor, Darek
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    The emerging discipline of Information Logistics in need of a Systemic Foundation.2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    The Gunilla Bradley Story: Linnaeus University Celebrates a Pioneer: Professor Gunilla Bradley2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Panel Discussion: ICT and Diversity of Information Societies2011In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference ICT, Society and Human Beings 2011 / [ed] Bradley, G., Whitehouse, D., and Singh, G., 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The panel focuses on ICT and the diversity of information societies. It is a follow up on the seminar held to honor professor emerita Gunilla Bradley at the Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, in August 2010.

  • 47.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Runardotter, M
    Ståhlbröst, A
    M2M: a qualitative study of users' feedback related to future M2M services2007Report (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Informatik.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    Collaborative Design: An SSM-Enabled Organizational Learning Approach2009In: International Journal of Information Technologies and Systems Approach, ISSN 1935-570X, E-ISSN 1935-5718, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 48-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the context of a three year applied research project conducted from 2003-2006 in a North American university library, staff were encouraged to reconsider organizational assumptions and design processes. The project involved an organizational leader and an external consultant who introduced and collaboratively applied Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) practice. Project results suggest the efficacy of using ‘soft’ systems thinking to guide interaction (re)design of technology-enabled environments, systems, and tools. In addition, participants attained insights into their new roles and responsibilities within a dynamically changing higher education environment. Project participants also applied SSM to redesign ‘in house’ information systems. The process of employing systems thinking practices to activate and advance organizational (re)learning, and initiating and elaborating user-centered interaction (re)design practices, culminated in a collaborative design (co-design) approach that readied participants for nimble responsiveness to continuous changes in the dynamic external environment.

  • 49.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of Colorado, Denver, USA.
    Collaborative Design: An SSM-Enabled Organizational Learning Approach2010In: Collaborative Technologies and Applications for Interactive Information Design : Emerging Trends in User Experiences / [ed] Scott Rummler och Kwong Bor Ng, IGI Global, 2010, p. 202-221Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Within the context of a three year applied research project conducted from 2003-2006 in a North American university library, staff were encouraged to reconsider organizational assumptions and design processes. The project involved an organizational leader and an external consultant who introduced and collaboratively applied Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) practice. Project results suggest the efficacy of using ‘soft’ systems thinking to guide interaction (re)design of technology-enabled environments, systems, and tools. In addition, participants attained insights into their new roles and responsibilities within a dynamically changing higher education environment. Project participants also applied SSM to redesign ‘in house’ information systems. The process of employing systems thinking practices to activate and advance organizational (re)learning, and initiating and elaborating user-centered interaction (re) design practices, culminated in a collaborative design (co-design) approach that readied participants for nimble responsiveness to continuous changes in the dynamic external environment.

  • 50.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of Colorado, Denver.
    Dilemmas: Leadership in Public Services: Bridging the Management Gap2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments in information technology have produced enormous changes for many professions. This leads to dilemmas, i.e., situations where professionals have to make difficult choices. Difficulties often arise because information technology implementations both require and enable new ways of acting. Such changes may be neither desired nor welcomed.

    Organizational dilemmas are now commonplace in academic libraries worldwide. Traditional library roles have been irreversibly altered by technology-enabled information search and retrieval systems. Coincidental with the evolution of the Internet and Google, these systems have transformed both library services and user workflows.

    These contemporary leadership dilemmas have been addressed for over a decade in three North American academic libraries. In response, an inclusive and systemic leadership model, the Informed Systems Methodology, places an explicit emphasis on using information to learn within the workplace. The methodology incorporates ‘soft’ systems design tools to guide co-creation of communication systems and professional practices that enable information sharing and knowledge creation among co-workers.

    The Informed Systems Methodology fosters principles of systems thinking and Informed Learning which catalyst holistic learning processes. In combination, co-designed systems, processes, and practices are co-created to engage individuals and groups in raising awareness, furthering collective understanding, promoting shared vision, and realizing shared leadership opportunities.

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