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  • 1.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, Universitetet i Oslo).
    Jansson, Maria
    Department of Business Adminstration and Social Sciences, Luleå University of Technology.
    Emphasizing Technology: sociotechnical implications2005In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, Vol. 18, p. 343-358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Björkman, Christina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Gender and IT Goes Second Millennium2006In: E-CAP 2006 European Computing and Philosophy Conference, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Where does feminist research on gender and IT stand today? What are the possibilities now and for the future? How does today’s research both build on and break with earlier approaches? In this article, we make a journey, where the starting point is taken in re-visiting two positions, liberal feminism and radical feminism, in the history of gender and (information) technology. We make a historical exposé to highlight some of the questions feminist technology research has been engaged in, in order to relate, inspire, challenge and partly also provoke future research. We then link these approaches to our own position in feminist technoscience research. This perspective opens up the world of information technology as a world of networks, relations, and negotiations going on within localised and situated practices, where IT and gender are continuously co-constructing each other. Feminist technoscience research challenges much of the present understandings, interpretations and even experiences of information technology and it demands re-thinking the foundations of computing. We discuss concepts and figurations developed within feminist technoscience research, that encourage us to imagine, think and do things differently, and we ask: “How do we make a difference?”

  • 3.
    Bratteteig, Tone
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo.
    Wagner, Ina
    Institute of Technology Assessment & Design, Vienna University of Technology.
    Morrison, Andrew
    InterMedia, University of Oslo.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo; Department of Informatics, University of Umeå.
    Research practices in digital design2010In: Exploring Digital Design: multi-disciplinary design practices / [ed] Wagner, Ina; Bratteteig, Tone and Stuedahl, Dagny, London: Springer, 2010, p. 17-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Institutionen för informatik, (Umeå universitet, Umeå Universitet.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Institutionen för informatik, (Umeå universitet, Umeå Universitet.
    Innovation and gender in the making: A gendered analysis of technological performances at the stage2009In: 5th conference on Gender and ICT: Digital Cultures:Participation - Empowerment - Diversity, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ekelin, Annelie
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge institute of technology, Sweden.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Oslo University, Norway.
    Exploring Digital Storytelling as a method for participatory design2008In: PDC '08 Proceedings of the Tenth Anniversary Conference on Participatory Design 2008 / [ed] Toni Robertson, Jesper Simonsen, David Hakken, ACM Press, 2008, p. 297-298Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core of Participatory Design builds on collaborative processes of users, designers and other stakeholders. [2] In order to realize this ambition a range of methods and techniques have been developed and used. Initially it was the ethnographic methods that were regarded as the most valuable ones, especially when investigating the userś everyday practices. [3] During the last years the methods repertoire has been expanded to also include methods inspired by narrative and visualization methods (games, story boards, digital scenarios etc.) [1, 7]

  • 6.
    Ekelin, Annelie
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge institute of technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Oslo University, Norway.
    Exploring Digital Storytelling as a method for participatory design2008In: PDC '08 Proceedings of the Tenth Anniversary Conference on Participatory Design 2008 / [ed] Toni Robertson, Jesper Simonsen, David Hakken, ACM Press, 2008, p. 297-298Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core of Participatory Design builds on collaborative processes of users, designers and other stakeholders. [2] In order to realize this ambition a range of methods and techniques have been developed and used. Initially it was the ethnographic methods that were regarded as the most valuable ones, especially when investigating the userś everyday practices. [3] During the last years the methods repertoire has been expanded to also include methods inspired by narrative and visualization methods (games, story boards, digital scenarios etc.) [1, 7]

  • 7.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Finken, Sisse
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitet i Oslo.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    From Mutual Learning to Agential Learning2012In: Diffraction Patterns: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on an Emerging Paradigm in Gender Studies, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Igira, Faraja T.
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitet i Oslo.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitet i Oslo.
    Whose participation? Whose knowledge?: Exploring PD in Tanzania-Zanzibar and Sweden2006In: Proceedings of the ninth conference on Participatory design: Expanding Boundaries in design - Volume 1, / [ed] I. Wagner, J. Blomberg, G. Jacucci & F. Kensing, New York: ACM Press , 2006, p. 105-114Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Attaching people and technology – between e and government2007In: GLIT-conference, Helsingborg, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we will discuss performance of e-government, gender, skills, learning and technology with the use of various stories of the transformation or modernisation process of Swedish public sector. Swedish public sector is involved in an overwhelming change process aiming towards the strong political hope to create a good service society with information technology. The transformation process is united under the overall concept e-government and it is also characterised as a modernisation process with the use of concepts such as rationalisation, efficiency and effectiveness. This is the grand narrative or the dominating discourse of Swedish society Another discourse is the silences of employees’ agencies, their participation in the development of services, and also the public sector as a dominating labour market for women. The modernisation or the implementation of IT will probably change the working conditions and practices radically for civil servants. Based on the earlier implementations of IT in the public sector there should be great concerns about how skills, experiences and gender intersect but also how they could and should influence the transformation processes; a process that again seems to be dominated by a technological determinism and a strong belief on IT as a driving force in the modernisation of the public sector. But as always there also exist other initiatives and stories. One is about a net based higher education study programme and courses in the field of e-government at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. Very few low-educated women employed in the public sector enrolled in the training although they were the explicit target group and there were articulated hopes about creating e-government training also including the daily practices and experiences of the civil servants. The low number of female students and also women´s absence in the national e-government and IT policies was the starting point for our research project From government to e-government: gender, skills, learning and technology. Women working at various sectors in four municipalities in Blekinge participated in the project between November 2005 and June 2007. In the project we developed and used a repertoire of methods sensitive to everyday practices in order to create space and time for women and their individual and collaborative stories. That is, narratives full of certainties, uncertainties and possibilities.

  • 10.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Teknovetenskapliga Studier, Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Carthographic Mapping - Participative Methods2010In: PDC 2010 Participation:: the Challenge Proceedings of the 11th Biennial Participatory Design Conference / [ed] Bødker, K., Brattetetig, T. Loi, D, & Robertson, T., New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2010, p. 171-174Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitetet i Oslo, Inst för Informatik, Universitet i Umeå.
    Design of digital democracies: Performance of citizenship, gender and IT2007In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 10, p. 404-423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    From Government to e-Government: Gender, Skills, Learning and Technology2007In: LearnIT, Särö, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Detta projekt "From Government to e-Government: Gender, Skills, Learning and Technology" (KS/LearnIT/GLIT) tar sin början i den snabba IT-utvecklingen och i de höga förhoppningarna till IT/IKT inom den svenska offentliga sektorn inom vilken dock ett antal spänningsfält kan identifieras: • Ett antal politiska målsättningar finns formulerade: rationalisering och effektivitet som de viktigaste. Dessa målsättningar ska genomföras och förverkligas genom den nya teknologin • Samtidigt diskuteras också om att erbjuda nya och bättre (e-)samhällstjänster till medborgarna. • Det finns dock en aspekt som de senaste politiska dokumenten i mindre grad talar om: de offentligt anställdas och deras inverkan och påverkan av dessa förändringsprocesser. • Det finns dock alternativa och inkluderande vägar att utveckla teknologier: Participatory Design (Användarmedverkan i systemutveckling). Denna tradition har haft två huvudmål: att påverka demokratisering av arbetslivet samt demokratisera designprocesser. • Den svenska jämställdhetsdiskussionen fokuserar på det låga antalet kvinnor inom IT. • Å andra sidan finns det forskning som berättar om kvinnors aktiva deltagande framförallt i den lokala IT-utvecklingen, som till exempel berättelser om bibliotekarier. • Det diskuteras om kunskapssamhälle med fokus på livslångt lärande, utan vilka kunskaper eller färdigheter som är önskvärda i formandet av våra framtider • Många av de idéer och tankar om lärande och kunskap som fått genomslag har sina rötter i den feministiska pedagogiken med sina nyckelord: ”empowerment, reflexivity, power, and participation” (Goodman et al, 2003). Syfte med projektet är att: • Studera lärande- och kunskapsprocesser hos kvinnor anställda inom den svenska offentliga sektorn i förändring • Utveckla och testa olika former av stöd för lärande och kunskapsprocesser relaterade till arbetet och utveckling av digitala tjänster inom den offentliga sektorn • Projektet syftar till att skapa en arena för lokala omförhandlingar om IKT och genus • Väva ihop dessa med design, lärande, kunskapsprocesser inom e-government • Utforska varför kvinnor inte var intresserade av att delta i e-governmentkurser vid BTH • Skapa nya samverkansformer för att utveckla nya utbildningsaktiviteter Genomförande • Intervjuer • Studie- och forskningscirkel • Designworkshops • Kurs

  • 13.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Institutt for informatikk, Oslo universitet;Institutionen för informatik, Umeå Universitet.
    Information technology at the crossroad of multiple layrers of sociotechnical relations2007In: Kurswechsel Zeitscrift für gesellschafts-, wirtschafts- und umweltpolitische Alternativen, ISSN 1016-8419, no 3, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Institutionen för informatik, Umeå Universitet; Institutt for informatikk, Oslo universitet.
    Mellan teknik och människor: kunskap och lärande i den kommunala vardagen2009In: Samhälle, teknik och lärande / [ed] Thomas Karlsohn, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2009, p. 86-103Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Presentation från LearnIT2007In: LearnIT, Särö, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Detta projekt "From Government to e-Government: Gender, Skills, Learning and Technology" (KKS/LearnIT/GLIT) tar sin början i den snabba IT-utvecklingen och i de höga förhoppningarna till IT/IKT inom den svenska offentliga sektorn inom vilken dock ett antal spänningsfält kan identifieras: • Ett antal politiska målsättningar finns formulerade: rationalisering och effektivitet som de viktigaste. Dessa målsättningar ska genomföras och förverkligas genom den nya teknologin • Samtidigt diskuteras också om att erbjuda nya och bättre (e-)samhällstjänster till medborgarna. • Det finns dock en aspekt som de senaste politiska dokumenten i mindre grad talar om: de offentligt anställdas och deras inverkan och påverkan av dessa förändringsprocesser. • Det finns dock alternativa och inkluderande vägar att utveckla teknologier: Participatory Design (Användarmedverkan i systemutveckling). Denna tradition har haft två huvudmål: att påverka demokratisering av arbetslivet samt demokratisera designprocesser. • Den svenska jämställdhetsdiskussionen fokuserar på det låga antalet kvinnor inom IT. • Å andra sidan finns det forskning som berättar om kvinnors aktiva deltagande framförallt i den lokala IT-utvecklingen, som till exempel berättelser om bibliotekarier. • Det diskuteras om kunskapssamhälle med fokus på livslångt lärande, utan vilka kunskaper eller färdigheter som är önskvärda i formandet av våra framtider • Många av de idéer och tankar om lärande och kunskap som fått genomslag har sina rötter i den feministiska pedagogiken med sina nyckelord: ”empowerment, reflexivity, power, and participation” (Goodman et al, 2003). Syfte med projektet är att: • Studera lärande- och kunskapsprocesser hos kvinnor anställda inom den svenska offentliga sektorn i förändring • Utveckla och testa olika former av stöd för lärande och kunskapsprocesser relaterade till arbetet och utveckling av digitala tjänster inom den offentliga sektorn • Projektet syftar till att skapa en arena för lokala omförhandlingar om IKT och genus • Väva ihop dessa med design, lärande, kunskapsprocesser inom e-government • Utforska varför kvinnor inte var intresserade av att delta i e-governmentkurser vid BTH • Skapa nya samverkansformer för att utveckla nya utbildningsaktiviteter Genomförande • Intervjuer • Studie- och forskningscirkel • Designworkshops • Kurs

  • 16.
    Ferati, Mexhid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Babar, Ayesha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Carine, Kanani
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Hamidi, Ali
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Participatory Design Approach to Internet of Things: Co-designing a Smart Shower for and with People with Disabilities2018In: Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction: Virtual, Augmented, and Intelligent Environments. UAHCI 2018 / [ed] Antona M., Stephanidis C., Springer, 2018, p. 246-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart home products are becoming widespread aiming to increase people’s independence, especially for the elderly and people with disabilities. In order to design them suitably for this community, their involvement in the requirement gathering and design process is particularly important. In this paper, we report a study we conducted with six people having various disabilities. The aim was to identify the type of smart product that mostly increases their independence at home. We used three requirement gathering methods in a participatory fashion, namely, cartographic mapping, future workshop, and cultural probe. The outcome of the study revealed that participants mostly needed a product for a bathroom, specifically a smart shower. The initial prototype design of the product was developed together with participants. Researchers further investigated the prototype design using littleBits electronic modules. The smart shower is anticipated to have the most effect in increasing not only user independence, but also privacy.

  • 17.
    Finken, Sisse
    et al.
    Oslo Universtitet, Department of Informatics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Performing Elderliness: Intra-actions with Digital Domestic Care Technologies2014In: ICT and Society: 11th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC11 2014, Turku, Finland, July 30 – August 1, 2014. Proceedings / [ed] Kimppa, K., Whitehouse, D., Kuusela,T. & Phahlamohlaka, J, Springer, 2014, p. 307-319Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss the process of meeting digital technology when entering a senior age, by taking a closer look at how different modes of independence and elderliness are (co-)constituted in relation to digital domestic care technologies.  Specifically, we suggest reading independence and elderliness as shaped by both the discursive and the material.  Our starting point is the notion of intra-action as introduced in Feminist Technoscience.  Thinking through use and design of digital technology from a standpoint of Feminism prompts us to widen the perspective on living with such technologies and, thusly, to raise questions about the process of coming of age as an independent person with such care technologies.

  • 18.
    Finken, Sisse
    et al.
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitet i Oslo.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Smart homes: In- and exclusions in design2012In: Design and displacement: social studies of science and technology, Copenhagen, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper our focus is on smart homes as an emerging phenomenon in care and services offered to senior citizens. The background of this phenomenon is the so-called tide-wave of elderly. Along with socio-economic challenges, politicians express a desire to keep alive the welfare state that offers senior citizen services to maintain their well-being and autonomy. New technologies are therefore considered as a means to meet these challenges. Senior citizens are, like other citizens, a heterogeneous group with different wishes, activities, demands, and expectations rather than a uniform group with similar needs. The boundaries between those included in the smart homes and those not, and the very way these are drawn have ontological implications for the subject and object that emerges out of ongoing activities. We ask what kinds of homes that comes into existence due to the integration of elderly, care staff, alarm providers, alarms, sensor and so on. In addition to these entities other more intangible entities such as policies, technological push, and governance regimes are included. We locate our discussion of smart homes as infrastructures to a relational ontology in which humans and nonhumans are understood not as pre-given but come into existence in intra-actions in ongoing material-discursive practices e.g. smart homes offered to senior citizens. Hence what come into existence is dependent on the entities included, entities that are not innocent but “they are necessary for making meaning” and “have real material-consequences“ (Barad 1996:187). Three vignettes are used in the exploration of the thinking house.

  • 19.
    Finken, Sisse
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    The Thinking House: on configuring of an infrastructure of care2011In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop: Infrastructures for Healthcare: Global Healthcare / [ed] Pernille Bjørn, Finn Kensing, Lars Rune Christensen, Köpenhamn, 2011, p. 43-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss some figurations (figures) that have emerged out of the resentreconfigurations of health care, which are rooted in the so-called tide-wave of elderly.We take a closer look at the phenomenon smart house for elderly to understand thehome when it, at the same time, becomes an in-baked infrastructure of public careservices. Such in-baked infrastructure supports senior citizens and disabled people intheir daily life, but, simultaneously, we argue, in such infrastructure technology and carebecomes intertwined and difficult to separate. We subject the topic through readingsconcerned with care and care technologies.

  • 20.
    Finken, Sisse
    et al.
    IT Universitet, Köpenhamn.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Becoming-with in Participatory Design2018In: This Changes Everything - ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do?: 13th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC13 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018, Poznan, Polen, September 19-21, 2018 / [ed] David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa, Springer, 2018, p. 258-268Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We draw on feminist technoscience to analyze actions and activities performed between participants in a Participatory Design workshop that unfolds in a realm of e-government. Stepping into this empirical site we want to show how participants (invited persons, researchers, methods, artifacts, gender stereotypes) become with each other. With such take on research endeavors we feed into current discussion in feminist research by illustrating how theory and practice intertwine and create realities.

  • 21.
    Finken, Sisse
    et al.
    IT University, Copenhagen.
    Mörtberg, ChristinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.Mirijamdotter, AnitaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Dilemmas 2015 Papers from the 18th Annual International Conference Dilemmas for Human Services: Organizing, Designing and Managing2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 18th annual International Research Conference ‘Dilemmas for Human Services’ and the preliminary Doctoral Consortium took place at Linnaeus University and Teleborg castle in Växjo, Sweden, during September 9th–11th 2015. The conference was organized as a joint effort between Linnaeus University, Växjö, and University of Linköping.

    The Dilemmas conference dates back to 1995. It was formed, and is maintained, by scholars at Staffordshire University, University of East London, and Luleå University of Technology. Generally, Dilemmas stimulates critical analysis and reflections, and encourages more careful considerations about dominant ideas and notions relevant for human services. With this, Dilemmas nurtures meetings between established and new coming scholars where policy, organizational, management and sociological issues relating to human services can be considered. The research topics relevant to such span areas of e.g. health, social services, housing and education. 

     

  • 22.
    Finken, Sisse
    et al.
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitet i Oslo.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    Mittuniversitet.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    de Petris, Linus
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Meaning making as a becoming: Sociomaterial orientations towards meaning making in organizational settings2013In: First Nordic STS Conference, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “In my agential realist account, meaning making is not a human-based practice, but rather a result of specific material reconfigurations of the world.” (Barad 2007:465n116)

     In the introductory quote Karen Barad states her non-anthropocentric positioning on meaning making.  Her position is rooted in ‘agential realism’ with which she gestures to a symbiotic relationship between meaning and matter.  From a standpoint of agential realism subjects and objects are not constituted as pre-fixed entities with specific properties; rather, they are performed and becoming in intra-actions through which boundaries and properties emerge and make meaningful (such) phenomena and concepts (Barad 2007).

     In this paper we bring forth Barad’s account on agential realism to unpack the mutual workings of subjects and objects within three different organizational setting. Accordingly, with Barad’s take on meaning making and the inseparableness of meaning and matter, we aim at unfolding how humans, activities, practices, things, technologies, and working life come into being, matters, and effects the very organization of (the) work (they do together).

     We draw on Barad and fellow STS scholars when asking the following questions:  What do the reconfiguring and redeployment of subjects and objects mean and how do they matter?  For whom?  In what way?  And with what effects?

     Thus, in re-entering a reading of meaning making through an optic of ‘agential realism’ we present three vignettes from different domains of working life that all feed into the questions raised above.  One vignette is situated in a meeting taking place in a project on IT systems design in a government agency, another vignette tells a story about a municipal planning project and the third zooms in on a project on care technologies in ICT based nursing homes (aka smart houses).  Different as they are, these vignettes all shed light on and seek to further our understands on how meaning is a becoming that happens in the very reconfiguration and redeployment of subjects and objects.

     

  • 23.
    Forssén, Annika
    et al.
    Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University.
    Carlstedt, Gunilla
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics/Centre of Women's Studies and Gender Research, University of Oslo.
    Compulsive sensitivity - A consequence of caring: A qualitative investigation into women carer’s difficulties in limiting their labours2005In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, Vol. 26, p. 652-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women are expected to care, both in public and private life, for the sick as well as the healthy. Some women have difficulties in limiting their caring, despite being deeply careworn. In this life-course study, based on in-depth interviews with elderly women in Sweden, the concept "compulsive sensitivity" presents a way toward understanding their difficulties. Compulsive sensitivity denotes the compulsion to see and respond to other people’s needs, whatever one’s own situation. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Inc.

  • 24.
    Gardsten, Cecilia
    et al.
    Kristianstad University.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Ethical considerations in Participatory Action Research (PAR)2014In: Nordic Conference in Nursing Research: methods and networks for the future, 10-12 June, 2014, Odense, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Gardsten, Cecilia
    et al.
    Kristianstad University.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University.
    Designing an ICT self-management service: suggestions from persons with type 2 diabetes2017In: Health and Technology, ISSN 2190-7188, E-ISSN 2190-7196, Vol. 7, no 2-3, p. 197-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the wishes and needs of people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) for a future information and communication technology (ICT) self-management service to help manage their condition and their everyday life. Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting more and more people and placing increasing demands on health care. The self-management of diabetes includes instrumental and, decision-making skills and skills in managing daily activities, which may be supported by an ICT service. In this study we used a participatory design including two sessions of Future Workshop (FW) as part of a larger research project on the self-management of diabetes. Adults with type 2 diabetes participated in two FW sessions in which their expressed wishes and needs for an ICT service all fell under the broad category of Acceptance of the diagnosis, with three other suggestions; Trust in partnerships, Communication, and Individualized information. The participants’ experience of the FW as a democratic process and their appreciation of mutual learning contributed to these results, which are consistent with the aims of person-centred care.

  • 26.
    Jansson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics. University of Oslo, Norway.
    A Cup of Coffee: Users’ Needs and Experiences of ICT in Homecare2011In: Human-Centered Design of E-Health Technologies: Concepts, Methods andApplications / [ed] Martina Ziefle, Carsten Röcker, IGI Global, 2011, p. 253-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The area of homecare is not normally associated with the use of Information and CommunicationTechnology (ICT). Today ICT and mobile ICT are being implemented within homecare practice to makethe job of caring more effective and attractive. This chapter focuses attention on the human aspectswhen an automatic planning system and a handheld computer were implemented in a homecare practice.The aim of the chapter is to explore care workers’ experiences of how these technologies supported andfacilitated their day-to-day work, but also how they affect daily work in practice. The authors’ findingsindicate that some of the wants and needs for ICT of the homecare team regarding their work practicewere met. The integration of principles from Participatory Action Research (PAR) in the ParticipatoryDesign (PD) process made it possible for staff to participate during the full development process, takepart in the design process and make decisions during the whole trial.

  • 27.
    Jansson, Maria
    et al.
    1. LuleDept Business Adm & Social Science, Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo/University of Umeå,.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå University of Technology.
    Old dreams, new means: an exploration of visions and situated knowledge in information technology2007In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 371-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the tensions and ambivalences of new and old technology and political visions of keeping viable, quality care and services for elderly citizens through the use of new information technologies. The visions of politicians and social service managers of keeping alive the welfare state and retaining its ability to offer quality care and services for elderly citizens are compared with the experiences of female care assistants and their expectations of technology. A feminist figure - the cyborg - will be used in this exploration. We consider how care assistants are integrated in networks of socio-technical relations between humans and non-humans, and the extent to which gender or asymmetrical power relations between women and men intervene in their stories.

  • 28.
    Jansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Participation in e-Home Healthcare @ North Calotte2008In: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2008: Building Bridges / [ed] Gulz, A., Magnusson, C., Malmborg, L., Eftring, H., Jönsson, B., and Tollmar, K., Association for Computing Machinery , 2008, p. 192-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation and the contribution of participatory design methods and techniques are explored in the context of a Scandinavian Home Healthcare project. The project was undertaken during 2004-2005. Its aim was to introduce mobile ICT equipment to health care workers in order to improve planning, including quality and precision of information exchange. The study was designed according to Participatory Action Research and Participatory Design principles. Methods employed in the project were observations, interviews, future workshops, and story boards to actively involve different stakeholders. The experience of the project indicates that, although the rhetoric was that of a participatory design and research project, participants are not equally regarded in terms of experiences and knowledge of the actual practice. Assumptions about technology influence development and implementation at the expense of the actual care activity. Further, participation and participatory design techniques used in the project demonstrate the complexity of home healthcare and the necessity to involve all the different occupational groups involved in the care of the client. However, organisational boundaries reinforced shortcomings in cross-functional and cross organisational cooperation. A final conclusion is that time for collaborative and collegial reflections is a necessity to support the learning process.

  • 29.
    Kurti, Erdelina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Working with Tacit Knowledge: An Empirical Investigation in Glass Blowing Industry in Sweden2012In: Proceedings of Social Technologies '12: Development of Social Technologies in the Complex World, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Melander Wikman, Anita
    et al.
    Insitutionen för Hälsovetenskap, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Jansson, Maria
    Informatik, Instituionen för Samhällsvetenskap och eknmi, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Institutionen för systemteknik, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Institutt for informatikk, Oslo universitet; Institutionen för informatik, Umeå universitet.
    The lighthouse alarm and locator trial: a pilot study2007In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 203-212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Panel Discussion: ICT and Diversity of Information Societies2011In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference ICT, Society and Human Beings 2011 / [ed] Bradley, G., Whitehouse, D., and Singh, G., 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The panel focuses on ICT and the diversity of information societies. It is a follow up on the seminar held to honor professor emerita Gunilla Bradley at the Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, in August 2010.

  • 32.
    Morrison, Andrew
    et al.
    InterMedia, University of Oslo.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo; Department of Informatics, University of Umeå.
    Wagner, Ina
    Institute of Technology Assessment & Design, Vienna University of Technology.
    Liestøl, Gunnar
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.
    Bratteteig, Tone
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo.
    Analytical perspectives2010In: Exploring digital design: multi-disciplinary design practices / [ed] Wagner, Ina, Bratteteig, Tone and Stuedahl, dagny, London: Springer, 2010, p. 55-103Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Björkman, Christina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Agential realism – something for gender and IT research?2008In: The 4th European Gender & ICT Symposium, The 3rd Christina Conference on Women´s Studies, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People´s everyday lives have changed and are continuously changing depending on thetechnologically mediated world we live in. Feminist researchers have explored the relationshipsbetween gender and information technology (IT), the gendering of IT and the co-construction ofgender and IT. This research has contributed to and created critical approaches towards pluralisticunderstandings of the relationships between gender and (information) technology. There exists abody of knowledge concerning not only gender, but also epistemological and ontological issues.However, explorations are ongoing processes in order to “encourage us to do this differently.”(Schneider 2005:21)In this exploratory paper we will use Karen Barad’s agential realism together with Haraway’sdiffraction to discuss systems development, the importance of materiality and its role in thedevelopment of IT-systems. While diffraction maps “where the effects of differences appear”(Haraway 1992:300), agential realism invites us to discuss systems development as materialdiscursivepractices. The focus is moved from interactions between humans/non-humans to intraactions(togetherness) in practices/doings/actions.We address the following questions: Does the approach of agential realism with intra-actions,apparatuses, and cuts help to find new fruitful understandings of gender and IT? Does theapproach help feminist researchers in developing future directions of gender and IT, creatingalternatives and acting accountably in the world of becoming, where agency remains at the heartof feminist practices?We are here in particular concerned with the design and construction of IT-systems and artefacts.In building these, different actors and practices can be involved, such as for example systemsdevelopers, programmers, specifications, design models, operating systems, programminglanguages, computers, protocols, managers, time, money, workplace culture, division of labour,gender and so on. In specific performances of material-discursive practices these are included orexcluded. Those included constitute the specific apparatus involved in boundary-making inmaterial-discursive practices. With a diffracted reading of various development practices we willmap the chosen apparatus and how it comes to participate in and enact a particular world ofbecoming. Due to the particular apparatus, categories and classifications, such as subjects andobjects, experts and non-experts, gender, information technology etc. are constituted.Consequently, what is included or excluded in the enactment orders the world differently sincedifferent realities (worlds) are sedimented out of particular practices/doings/actions. Beingaccountable means to ask if we need other kinds of practices and enactments, with newconfigurations of agency that work for change?

  • 34.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Björkman, Christina
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge University of Technology.
    Agential Realism – Something for Gender and IT Research?2007In: The 3rd Christina Conference on Women´s Studies/The 4th European, Helsinki, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People´s everyday lives have changed and are continuously changing depending on the technologically mediated world we live in. Feminist researchers have explored the relationships between gender and information technology (IT), the gendering of IT and the co-construction of gender and IT. This research has contributed to and created critical approaches towards pluralistic understandings of the relationships between gender and (information) technology. There exists a body of knowledge concerning not only gender, but also epistemological and ontological issues. However, explorations are ongoing processes in order to “encourage us to do this differently.” (Schneider 2005:21) In this exploratory paper we will use Karen Barad’s agential realism together with Haraway’s diffraction to discuss systems development, the importance of materiality and its role in the development of IT-systems. While diffraction maps “where the effects of differences appear” (Haraway 1992:300), agential realism invites us to discuss systems development as material-discursive practices. The focus is moved from interactions between humans/non-humans to intra-actions (togetherness) in practices/doings/actions. We address the following questions: Does the approach of agential realism with intra-actions, apparatuses, and cuts help to find new fruitful understandings of gender and IT? Does the approach help feminist researchers in developing future directions of gender and IT, creating alternatives and acting accountably in the world of becoming, where agency remains at the heart of feminist practices? We are here in particular concerned with the design and construction of IT-systems and artefacts. In building these, different actors and practices can be involved, such as for example systems developers, programmers, specifications, design models, operating systems, programming languages, computers, protocols, managers, time, money, workplace culture, division of labour, gender and so on. In specific performances of material-discursive practices these are included or excluded. Those included constitute the specific apparatus involved in boundary-making in material-discursive practices. With a diffracted reading of various development practices we will map the chosen apparatus and how it comes to participate in and enact a particular world of becoming. Due to the particular apparatus, categories and classifications, such as subjects and objects, experts and non-experts, gender, information technology etc. are constituted. Consequently, what is included or excluded in the enactment orders the world differently since different realities (worlds) are sedimented out of particular practices/doings/actions. Being accountable means to ask if we need other kinds of practices and enactments, with new configurations of agency that work for change?

  • 35.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo; Department of Informatics, University of Umeå.
    Bratteteig, Tone
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo.
    Wagner, Ina
    Institute of Technology Assessment & Design, Vienna University of Technology.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.
    Morrison, Andrew
    InterMedia, University of Oslo.
    Methods that matter in digital design research2010In: Exploring digital design: multi-disciplinary design practices / [ed] Wagner, Ina, Brateteig, Tone and Stuedahl, Dagny, London: Springer, 2010, p. 105-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, University of Umeå; Department of Informatics, University of Oslo.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Attaching people and technology: between e and government2010In: Gender issues in learning and working with information technology: social constructs and cultural context / [ed] Booth, S.,, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2010, p. 83-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Meborgarperspektiv - vad kan det vara?2008Other (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Institutt for Informatikk, Universitet i Oslo.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Institutt for medier og kommunikasjon, Universitet i Oslo.
    Silences and sensibilities: Increasing participation in IT design2005In: Critical Computing: - Between Sense and Sensibility, New York: ACM Press , 2005, p. 141-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on challenges of heterogeneous knowledges in participatory design. How are different experiences and knowledge negotiated in participatory design processes and how can the design process maintain sensitivity towards the subtle aspects of negotiation of knowledges? The paper reports from two design projects, the first related to design of ICT-based learning environments for workplaces in Norway and the second a research project with middle managers and care assistants from social services departments in the public sector in Sweden. As a main argument the paper focuses on the role of silence in the negotiation of knowledge. Sensitivity in design should then as well be directed towards the silent and invisible aspects of the design process, because they can be as important for the participation and design outcome. © 2005 ACM.

  • 39.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, University of Umeå, Umeå; Department of Informatics, University of Oslo,.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.
    Alander, Sara
    WHY DO THE ORDERS GO WRONG ALL THE TIME?: Exploring sustainability in an e-commerce application in Swedish public school kitchens2010In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 68-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss sustainability, particularly social and cultural sustainability, in relation to an e-commerce application used in the kitchen of a Swedish public school. The notion of sustainability got its public definition through the Brundtland Commission and the report Our Common Future in which ecological as well as economic and social dimensions were underlined. An additional dimension, culture, has recently unfolded. The data reported in this paper were collected in public school and pre-school meal production. This is a large, institutional, tax-funded activity in Sweden as all pre-schools, compulsory schools and most upper secondary schools serve free lunch to the children and students. We discuss how an e-commerce application complicated the daily routines in the school kitchen rather than making the ordering of food stuff easier or more flexible and how small things that mattered in the staff's day-to-day activities shed light on the application's problems and weaknesses. Following Agenda 21, we relate these shortcomings to sustainability and also to participation. The discussion builds on social and cultural sustainability and participatory design with a focus on the involvement of users in design and implementation of IT systems and services.

  • 40.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University ; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Alander, Sara
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Why Do the Orders Go Wrong All the Way?: Exploring Sustainability in an E-Commerce Application in Swedish Public School Kitchens2011In: Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings:: Theory and Framework / [ed] Darek M. Haftor, Anita Mirijamdotter, Hershey and New York: IGI Global, 2011, p. 419-433Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss sustainability, particularly social and cultural sustainability, in relation to ane-commerce application used in the kitchen of a Swedish public school. The notion of sustainabilitygot its public definition through the Brundtland Commission and the report Our Common Future inwhich ecological as well as economic and social dimensions were underlined. An additional dimension,culture, has recently unfolded. The data reported in this paper were collected in public school and preschoolmeal production. This is a large, institutional, tax-funded activity in Sweden as all pre-schools,compulsory schools and most upper secondary schools serve free lunch to the children and students.We discuss how an e-commerce application complicated the daily routines in the school kitchen ratherthan making the ordering of food stuff easier or more flexible and how small things that mattered in thestaff’s day-to-day activities shed light on the application’s problems and weaknesses. Following Agenda21, we relate these shortcomings to sustainability and also to participation. The discussion builds onsocial and cultural sustainability and participatory design with a focus on the involvement of users indesign and implementation of IT systems and services.

  • 41.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo; Department of Informatics, University of Umeå.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola .
    Designing for sustainable ways of living with technologies2010In: Exploring digital design: multi-disciplinary design practices / [ed] Wagner, Ina, Bratteteig, Tone and Stuedahl, Dagny, London: Springer, 2010, p. 261-282Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    van der Velden, Maja
    Department of Informatics, Universityn of Oslo.
    Studying the Entanglement of Humans and Technology in Work Practices: A 'Modest Intervention'2012In: Dilemmas for Human Services 2011: Papers from the 15th International research Conference, 2011 / [ed] Chandler, J., Bary, J. & Berg, E, London: Royl Docks Business School, University of East London, UK , 2012, p. 97-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Pirli, Myrto
    et al.
    Computer Technology Institute and Press "Diophantus", Greece.
    Finken, Sisse
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The Embodiment of Relationships of Adult Facebookers2016In: Technology and Intimacy: Choice or Coercion: 12th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC12 2016, Salford, Uk, September 7-9, 2016 / [ed] Kreps, D.,Fletcher, G. & Griffiths, M, Springer, 2016, Vol. 474, p. 204-214Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade we have seen a rise of social media. Within this landscape of online services Facebook plays an immense role in facilitating and creating bonds bewteen people. In this paper we enter a qualitative study conducted with a small group of adult Facebookers over 58. We do so in an effort to understand waht kind of relationships one can have through this digital media. The theortical lens used is Phenomenology, which we find fruitful for more carefully looking into relationship between humans and technology. 

  • 44.
    Runardotter, Mari
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Univeristy of Umeå.
    Being an Archivist in our Times: Trying to Manage Long-Term Digital Preservation2007In: International Journal of Public Information Systems, ISSN 1653-4360, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 47-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology offers the possibility to produce and archive more recorded information than ever before. Thus it is has become feasible to preserve and have access to information in almost unlimited amounts. In sharp contrast, the situation today suggests that societal data has become significantly less accessible than was previously the case. This is both ironic and tragic. In this paper, we recognize that the cultural heritage is at risk, given current circumstances as revealed through observation and dialogue with an archivist. While there are many projects, cultural heritage institutions, government agencies and private enterprises involved in an ambitious research agenda, the majority of these are focussed on technical solutions. In contrast, we provide an indepth point of view of an archivist who is expected to preserve information in order to safeguard the long-term preservation of the cultural heritage. This report reveals the challenges as well as the systemic implications related to the full implementation of the Archival Information Systems guidelines, that fully involve archivists and users in systems design features and functionalities, in order to enable the advancement of longterm digital preservation.

  • 45.
    Runardotter, Mari
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Umeå University ; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    The Changing Nature of Archives: Whose Responsibility?2011In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of eGovernment and the increasing amount of e-services leads to the production of huge amounts of digitally recorded information. In turn, this raises a demand for well-functioning e-archives, considering the laws and regulations of public and citizens‟ rights and obligations. However, we find that there are difficulties in public organisations in dealing with the complex and challenging issue of digital preservation. Not only does eGovernment transformation change productivity, governance and governmental coordination and collaboration, it also transforms the everyday work practices of many public sector employees. A vivid example is archivists and archival work. The matter of e-archives is often left to the archivists, who have limited power and influence to be able to deal with digital preservation to the extent needed. The research question we address is therefore: who should be held responsible for the changing nature of archives and digital preservation in an organization? Our aim in this paper is to analyse and discuss plans for, and layers of, responsibility for digital preservation as configured and reconfigured in archivists‟ stories and Swedish national policy documents. We use a model that covers three arenas: political, organizational, and practical (or individual). Our findings suggest that to conduct good governance and create properly-functioning e-archives there is a need to spread the responsibility for these e-archives and to plan for cooperation, coordination, and communication around digital preservation. This should happen in interplay between the various actors which hold the practical responsibility, technological responsibility and strategic responsibility. Additionally we note that the view of archivists as keepers of information is moving towards the role of facilitators, who support access to information rather than merely keeping it intact for future. Moreover, as a result of technological developments we find that issues to address in further studies are the present laws and regulations that govern archives, change of work practices and ways of dealing with digital preservation.

  • 46.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    et al.
    University of Vienna.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Researching Innovative Educational Practices : Experiences of Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies2012In: IRIS: selected papers of the Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia / [ed] C. Keller and M. Wiberg, Akademika forlag, 2012, p. 53-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile and ubiquitous technologies are influencing and challenging today’s education. These technologies change the nature of educational settings, requirements and skills as they create opportunities for students and teachers to advance learning and teaching in different ways. Nevertheless, there is a lack of innovative educational practices and mobile and ubiquitous technologies are still used to a limited extent. Based on three different projects, this paper explores teachers’ and students’ experiences use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in an educational setting. A number of themes were identified. Added values and challenges were two main themes that teachers and students experienced. 

  • 47.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Researching Innovative Educational Practices: Exploring the Use of Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile and ubiquitous technologies are influencing and challenging today’s education. These technologies change the nature of educational settings, requirements and skills as they create opportunities for students and teachers to advance learning and teaching in a different ways. Nevertheless, there is a lack of innovative educational practices, mobile and ubiquitous technologies are still used in limited extent. Based on three different projects this paper explores teachers and students experiences use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in an educational setting. A number of themes were identified. Added values and challenges were two main themes teachers and students experienced. 

  • 48.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Feminist Technoscience as a Resource for Working with Science Practices: a Critical Approach, and Gender Equality in Swedish Higher IT Educations2018In: This Changes Everything - ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do?: HCC13 2018 / [ed] David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa, Springer, 2018, p. 221-231Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science is according to the Swedish legislation for higher education (Högskoleförordningen) a central quality aim for higher educations. In the Swedish Higher Education Authority’s (UKÄ) new quality assurance system, the integration of gender equality is one of several quality aspects that are being measured. This paper concerns a planned study with the aim to explore how feminist technoscience can contribute to challenging existing science practices, and a critical approach, while at the same time work as a theoretical resource for the integration of gender equality in Swedish higher IT educations. Feminist technoscience makes possible critical questions about scientific practices in both educational contexts and in work life, about researchers’ positioning, about consequences, and about power issues. Posing such questions is central in IT educations, since we live in a society in which digital technologies increasingly constitute preconditions for a working reality, and both reproduce existing structures and form new patterns. In this reality it is central to ask whether current science practices are enough, and how feminist technoscience can make a difference, in those educations that produce the IT experts of the tomorrow. The study will be conducted as a qualitative field study with a focus on how teachers and students in Swedish higher IT educations practice science and a critical approach, and feminist technoscience in their educations.

  • 49.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Information Technology and Media, Mid Sweden University.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway and Department of Informatics, University of Umeå, Sweden.
    'But that is a systems solution to me' - negotiations in IT design2010In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we argue that it is not self-evident how 'requirements' are defined, but that 'requirements' are enacted differently by differently situated actors, and that this has consequences in design practices. The purpose of the paper is to explore the consequences of prototyping practices in a local IT design project. The empirical material was gathered through the use of ethnographic methods, and analysed diffractively. Graphical user interface prototypes were tools for formulating business requirements in a business process analysis. Through a reading of a discussion which took place in a work meeting about the prototypes, we discuss how business requirements were enacted. This is discussed in relation to divergent and convergent approaches in IT design. One consequence was a risk that the prototyping process moved too fast to solutions, and another was the risk that the business process analysis method reproduced the dominant story of women's absence in IT design.

  • 50.
    Shidende H., Nima
    et al.
    University of Dodoma.
    Igira T., Faraja
    Institute of Finance Management.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    An Ethnographically Informed Participatory Design of Primary Healthcare Information Technology in a Developing Country Setting2017In: Participatory Design & Health Information Technology / [ed] Kanstrup, A.M., Bygholm, A., Bertelsen, P. & Nøhr, C, Amsterdam, Berlin, Washington DC: IOS Press, 2017, 233, p. 131-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnography, with its emphasis on understanding activities where they occur, and its use of qualitative data gathering techniques rich in description, has a long tradition in Participatory Design (PD). Yet there are limited methodological insights in its application in developing countries. This paper proposes an ethno- graphically informed PD approach, which can be applied when designing Primary Healthcare Information Technology (PHIT). We use findings from a larger multi- disciplinary project, Health Information Systems Project (HISP) to elaborate how ethnography can be used to facilitate participation of health practitioners in developing countries settings as well as indicating the importance of ethnographic approach to participatory Health Information Technology (HIT) designers. Further- more, the paper discusses the pros and cons of using an ethnographic approach in designing HIT.

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