lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 47 of 47
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Helén
    et al.
    Region Kronoberg.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Kliniska examinationer, exemplet ULVE2015In: Kliniska examinationer: Handbok för sjuksköterskestudenter på grund- och avancerad nivå / [ed] Sofia Almerud Österberg, Carina Elmqvist, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 115-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Asp, Margareta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås.
    ”Samvetsstress och dåliga villkor bakom sjuksköterskeflykten”2017In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2017-05-04Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Holst, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andersson, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The Encounter between Caring Sciences and the Lifeworld: The Art of Making Knowledge Alive and Embodied2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific knowledge is characterized by abstract descriptions and structures, which are not identical to the lived reality. Scientific knowledge cannot directly be applied on the lived existence, without being transformed and adjusted to the individual’s very complex lifeworld. Learning in caring contexts is an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and the learner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start an intertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. Lifeworld didactics are built on an approach about learning as an individual process and that learning takes its point of departure in the learner’s previous experiences, which accompanies the learning process. The challenges within lifeworld didactics are to be open and sensitive to the learner’s lifeworld and with tact support the development of a reflective attitude in the learning process. Lifeworld didactics strategies are of crucial importance in different caring contexts. This symposium presents three lifeworld led phenomenological research projects that have focused on acquiring caring science knowledge in caring contexts, more precisely it is the encounter between caring science and the lifeworld. The research is within the framework of lifeworld didactics, but the three projects each have a special focus.

  • 4.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    Högskolan Borås.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Galvin, Kathleen
    University of Hull.
    Ways of intertwining caring and learning: supporting an embodied understanding of how patients can be cared for within an existential framework2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support care for patients in an adequate way, Caring science theory and nursing practice need to be intertwined to bridge problematic dualisms such as mind and body, sense and sensibility, theory and practice, learning and caring. The overall aim in caring is to support wellbeing and to strengthen health and how this is achieved has been discussed extensively. However ways of overcoming such dualistic understandings are needed to pave the way for a care that is up to the task of responding to human possibilities and vulnerabilities within the complexity of existence.

    In supporting patients, we argue that a range of aspects, inter-relational, intellectual, emotional and embodied need to be evoked and reflected upon by students as a beginning foundation for the incorporation of, and the intertwining of Caring science theory and practice. This intertwining draws on knowledge for ‘the head’, ‘the heart’, ‘the hand’ (Galvin & Todres, 2013) and can develop and support a particular sensibility and sensitivity both of which are needed within clinical and learning contexts.

    In this presentation we will show the importance of a solid theoretical foundation drawn from Husserl’s lifeworld theory and theory of intentionality, Merleau-Ponty’s later philosophy concerning how everything is intertwined in existence, as well as Gadamer’s ideas about shared understandings and Gendlin’s work on embodied relational understanding. While we have drawn from all these phenomenological perspectives, we will show how they serve as a coherent direction for overcoming the dualistic consequences of ‘splits’ such as, between human and world, illness and well-being , caring and technology, learning and caring, youth and old age, life and death and so on (Dahlberg et al., 2009).

    Such existential ways of understanding and well considered ‘didactic tools’ are needed to support this concern. We will share a number of illustrations from the lifeworld led care and education theme within EACS to contribute to such developments:

    • Embodied interpretations shared as poems (Galvin & Todres, 2011)
    • Using films to support the understanding of Caring science theory and practice (Hörberg, Ozolins & Ekebergh, 2011; Hörberg & Ozolins, 2012)
    • Learning through students’ creating poems from their responses to film (Hörberg, Ozolins & Galvin)
    • The intertwining of caring and learning in clinical settings illustrated through two examples: firstly, a ‘developing and learning care unit’ (Ekebergh, 2009, 2011; Holst & Hörberg, 2012, 2013) and secondly, as a student led health clinic (Ozolins & Elmqvist & Hörberg, 2013) both supported by structures specifically from the lifeworld perspective.

    This paper could serve reflection on how to integrate Caring science theory with practice in order to develop new curricula and practice to take care of the pending dualisms and other obscuring influences, such as 21st century organisational structures and demands that are problematic in research, learning and caring.

  • 5.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The experiences of patients receiving care from nursing students at a Dedicated Education Unit: A phenomenological study2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 353-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how patients perceive being cared for by student nurses, in a clinical context in the form of a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). The study has been performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach grounded in phenomenology. Lifeworld interviews were conducted with patients who had received care from student nurses on an orthopaedic dedicated education unit (DEU) and data have been analysed for meanings. The findings reveal how patients experience to be carried along as a part of the students' learning process. This is described in more detail via the constituents: a mutual invitation to participe, the importance of genuine encounters, and essential support. Patients experience both a stable and a less stable care in a learning environment and it is thus essential for them to be invited to be a part of both the students’ learning process and their own health process. The findings also highlight the key role of the supervisors for patients’ sense of security. Finally there are indications that concepts such as DEU with a lifeworld-led didactic, based on reflection on both the patients’ stories and the students’ experiences, can create learning environments that support patients’ health processes and also students’ learning processes.

  • 6.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Högskolan i Borås.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Student nurses’ experiences of how caring andlearning is intertwined: A phenomenological study2014In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical studies in nursing education ought to create conditions for the students to link theory to praxis.Previous research in this field focuses on the gap between theory and practice, learning environments, supervision andreflection connected to caring and learning. In addition there are studies that propose the concept of learning and caring asintertwined. The aim of this study is to describe how caring and learning is intertwined from a student perspective.Methods: The study was carried out using Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) with a phenomenological approach.Lifeworld interviews were conducted with students after their clinical placement on a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU).Results: The essential meaning is a movement where caring and learning fall into place which appears in an atmospherefilled with appealing challenges, but has to be sensitive to the students’ readiness. The atmosphere depends on their senseof security and how they experience confirming and affirming responses. Encountering the patient means that the studentscan gain a sense of the whole and the theory falls into place. The results also highlight how the student, in this atmosphere,has a desire to find a new role in a personal style.Conclusions: The study emphasizes the importance of supporting the students in understanding learning and caring asintertwined and not separated. A dualistic approach could harm the students’ aim to get the knowledge embodied. Thisholistic perspective requires a reflective attitude on caring and learning and has to be further developed in the didactics andsupervision.

  • 7.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås.
    Caring and learning intertwined in supervision at a dedicated education unit: a phenomenological study2015In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 753-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supervising student nurses in clinical praxis entails dealing with both caring and learning aspects. There is a dearth of research focusing on both the caring and learning aspects in supervision. The present study describes how caring and learning is intertwined in supervision. The study was performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach and analyzed phenomenologically for meanings. Eight interviews were conducted with supervisors on an orthopedic-dedicated education unit. The findings reveal how supervisors constantly move in order to be either close to or standing back, adjusting to the students’ and the patients’ needs. This is described in more detail via the constituents: handling responsibility in constant movement, participating in a new and different way, coexisting with students creates meaning and development. The findings show that a reflective attitude in supervision, clear structure for daily activities, and a lifeworld-led didactics can promote a learning and caring environment. Supervisors’ demanding task requires pauses in order to maintain motivation among supervisors. A mutual link between supervisors, students and patients is crucial in order to create an environment where caring and learning are intertwined.

  • 8.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Managers’ responsibility to support caring and learning in clinical education units2017In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 34-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Managers in clinical education units (CEUs) have the responsibility to facilitate evidence-based environments for both caring and learning. Promoting such environments might be challenging in times of financial constraints and organisation changes.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe how managers experience their responsibility to support the caring and learning environments in CEUs.

    Methods: The study method followed the principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) grounded in a phenomenological approach. The study was conducted at a hospital in Southern Sweden. Ten first- and second-line managers responsible for CEUs were interviewed. The interviews were conducted as reflective dialogues using an open, and bridled approach.

    Results: The results show that clinical education unit managers regard the responsibility to support caring and learning environments as a challenging experience, elucidated in three themes: (1) to have or to take responsibility; (2) cooperation that supports and challenges; and (3) bringing it all together— a daily struggle.

    Conclusions: In conclusion, the managers of CEUs need to be aware of the importance of common theoretical grounds for caring and learning. Caring and learning are more likely to be intertwined when responsibility is taken, when collaboration between actors is characterised by respect and when an awareness of the importance of reflection is present. Awareness of the importance of creating opportunities for reflection and mutual collaboration among the different actors involved could lead to improvements in nursing education and, therefore, improved patient care.

  • 9. Galvin, Kathleen
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Todres, Les
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    From Phenomenology to Caring Science: Directions for qualitative research and practice2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Students ’ learning in an encounter with patients – supervised in pairs of students2012In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 693-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring science didactics is the framework of a supervision model that includes students learning process, from a lifeworld perspective, in an encounter with patients, supported by supervision in pair of students. A challenge in nursing education is to bridge the gap between theory and praxis. Reflection and a model for learning and supervision enable students to learn in meeting patients and to get a deeper understanding of their lifeworld. The aim of this study was to describe the learning process of students, in an encounter with a patient, when supported by supervision given to pair of students. Data were collected through interviews and diary entries, interviews in pair of students, and diary entries in private. The analysis was based on reflective lifeworld research approach, founded on phenomenology. Results show that security and insecurity in pair of students, environmental conditions and attitude of health care professionals have influence on students’ learning process. Meeting patients is described as important for the student learning process, but also as indiscernible and that supervised reflection serves to bridge the gap between theoretical and practical knowledge. Structured supervision is shown to be supportive for nursing students when developing in their learning process.

    Keywords: caring science; learning; lifeworld; nursing students; phenomenology; reflection

  • 11.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Students learning in clinical practice, supervised inpairs of students: a phenomenological study2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 113-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical studies have an important position in Nursing Education, it is thus important to develop the learning strategies of students in order to facilitate their learning process during the clinical practice. The aim of the study is to describe the process of students’ learning towards their profession, when supported by supervision in pairs.

    Methods: Data has been collected through interviews of students during their clinical studies. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenological traditions. The clinical settings are based on the model of the Developing and Learning Care Unit that has a structure that supports students in their learning towards becoming nurses.

    Results: Results show that structured supervision is favourable for students learning, where pair of students, space and time play a significant role. The results are illustrated in following themes: The significance of responsibility for learning, the strength and sensitivity in pairs of students, the focus on doing, the significance of the attitude of the supervisor, the vulnerability and potential of the learning environment and Reflection as a possibility and a pre-requisite.

    Conclusions: The study shows that the conduct of supervising in pair of students is of great importance for students’ learning and it is thus important to develop a reflective supervising approach and also knowledge of how to support students’ learning.

  • 12.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Learning to care in changing times2017In: European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, 20–21 April 2017: book of abstracts, 2017, p. 20-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Developing and Learning Care Unit is a learning environment in clinical practice designed to integrate theory and practice by using lifeworld didactics in order to support pairs of students in their professional development. Lifeworld didactics is based on a lifeworld led learning approach, which focuses on each student’s experiences and knowledge and supports each individual student and the students as a pair. The aim of this study is to explain and create an understanding of the phenomenon “learning space” that occurs in the interaction between patient, pairs of students and supervisors, during clinical practice. This hermeneutic study is based on a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach. The analysis is based on observations and interviews with patients, pairs of student nurses and supervisors at Developing and Learning Care Units. The result shows that the patient, pairs of students and supervisors are placed in the learning space, and are therefore related to each other. The relationships that arise in the learning space are enhanced through responsibility and the respect shown to each other. A relationship that appears to be supportive is characterized by: thoughtfulness, understanding of each other and enabling to ask questions. This creates an interplay of dynamic movements that are directed toward a common goal and thus provide opportunities to give and receive support. A balance between the patient, pairs of students and supervisor should thus be recognized to facilitate a favorable learning environment.

  • 13.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The experiences of supporting learning in pairs of nursing students in clinical practice2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, no September, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how supervisors experience supporting nursing students' learning in pairs on a Developing and Learning Care Unit in Sweden. The present study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenology. A total of 25 lifeworld interviews were conducted with supervisors who had supervised pairs of students. The findings reveal how supervisors support students' learning in pairs through a reflective approach creating learning space in the encounter with patients, students and supervisors. Supervisors experience a movement that resembles balancing between providing support in learning together and individual learning. The findings also highlight the challenge in supporting both the pairs of students and being present in the reality of caring. In conclusion, the learning space has the potential of creating a relative level of independency in the interaction between pairs of students and their supervisor when the supervisor strives towards a reflective approach.

  • 14.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The learning space: interpersonal interactions between nursing students, patients, and supervisors at developing and learning care units2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1368337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous research shows that the learning space is significant for students’ learning in pairs in clinical practice but does not explain the meaning of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is thus to explain and understand the learning space that occurs in the interaction between the patients, the pairs of nursing students, and the supervisors on a developing and learning care unit in Sweden. 

    Method: The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on hermeneutics. A total of 39 informants, consisting of 16 patients, five pairs of students (10 students), and 13 supervisors, were observed and interviewed. 

    Results: The results reveal that an interpersonal linkage between the patients, the students, and the supervisors is created within the learning space. A learning space, based on respect towards each other, creates the prerequisite for beneficial and supportive interactions that contribute to a deeper relationship. 

    Conclusion: The phenomenon is complex due to its expandable nature and due to the fact that the learning space cannot be isolated from the surrounding environment. In order to exploit the potential of the learning space it is of importance to understand and consider the learning space as a whole.

  • 15.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Att vårdas eller fostras. Det rättspsykiatriska vårdandet och traditionens grepp2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To be sentenced to care in the forensic psychiatric services can be seen as one of the most comprehensive encroachments society can make on a person's life and being, as it entails a limitation of the individual's freedom but with no time limit. The aim of this dissertation is to describe caring in forensic psychiatry based on how it is experienced by those who perform the caring and by those are cared for in a maximum secure unit. A reflective lifeworld approach, based on phenomenological philosophy, has been applied. The data has been collected in interviews that have been analyzed by use of a meaning analysis searching for the essence of the phenomenon. The results of the research are presented in two empirical studies and a general structure based on the empirical findings. The dissertation also contains an excursus, a philosophical intermediate chapter containing further analysis of the results of the studies.

    The results show how the forensic psychiatric care is experienced as being non-caring by the patients with only small "pockets" of good care. Caring consists of corrective techniques that are unreflected and contradictory, where the conditions are determined by the caregivers and the ward culture. The correcting takes place through the modification of the patients' behaviour with the aim of the patients having to adapt themselves to the terms of the care provision. This care results in the patients trying, by use of different strategies, to adapt them-selves to the demands of the caregivers in order to gain privileges. At the same time the patients long to get away from the care system and are lacking real, meaningful and close relationships. To be the subject of care entails struggling against an approaching overwhelming sense of resignation and to care entails experiencing both power and powerlessness in performing the care. A destructive power struggle is being waged within forensic psychiatric care that suppresses the caring potential and true caring is thus elusive.

    The characteristics of forensic psychiatric care, based on the results of the research, are clarified in the dissertation's excursus. These include the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power and how this is materialized in care situations as well as the influence of tradition on current forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of the French philosopher Michel Foucault.

    The dissertation shows that if the caring potential is to be able to be developed and form a caring nucleus for forensic psychiatric care then education levels need to be further developed. A caring culture and caring environment is needed where true caring can gain a foothold. In order for this to become a possibility the current caring culture and environment must be clarified, questioned and examined. The prevalent fundamental ideas in forensic psychiatric care have to be "jeopardized" and challenged by new scientifically based ideas on what constitutes true caring in this context.

  • 16.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Betydelsen av förståelse i vårdande inom rättspsykiatrisk vård2017In: Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård: att bli lyssnad på och förstådd / [ed] Karin Dahlberg & Inger Ekman, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, 1, p. 271-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Betydelsen av kunskap och lärande2015In: Kliniska examinationer: Handbok för sjuksköterskestudenter på grund- och avancerad nivå / [ed] Sofia Almerud Österberg, Carina Elmqvist, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 35-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Caring Science and the Development of Forensic Psychiatric Caring2015In: Perspectives in psychiatric care, ISSN 0031-5990, E-ISSN 1744-6163, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 277-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to discuss how caring science can contribute and provide a theoretical foundation for the development of caring within forensic psychiatric care.

    CONCLUSIONS: It is not only a challenge but also a great opportunity to use caring science theory within forensic psychiatric care when caring for the patients and supporting their health processes.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: There is a need for more knowledge about, understanding of, and willingness to care for patients within forensic psychiatric settings in a “true caring”way. In order to achieve this, a caring culture is required, one that supports carers and provides them with opportunities to further develop a caring attitude.

  • 19.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dialog och partnerskap: förutsättningar och möjligheter i psykiatrisk omvårdnad - vad innebär det egentligen?2016In: Psyche, ISSN 0283-3468, no 3, p. 14-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vårdrelatoner är både en möjlighet och en förutsätning för at kunna förstå och möta patenten och en möjlighet för at uppnå delaktghet. Det handlar om at försöka möta och förstå patenten som människa och den person hen är. Psykiatrisjuksköterskan och forskaren Ulrica Hörberg från Linnéuniversitetet refekterar över dialog och partnerskap som förutsätning och möjlighet i psykiatrisk omvårdnad.

  • 20.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Film som livsberättelse i utbildningssammanhang2015In: Livsberättelser, kultur & hälsa / [ed] Motzi Eklöf, Margaretha Petersson, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2015, 1, p. 61-66Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Maktens grepp om det rättspsykiatriska vårdandet2008In: Rättspsykiatriskt vårdande: Vårdande av lagöverträdare med psykisk ohälsa, Stockholm: Studentlitteratur , 2008, 1, , p. 231p. 177-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Patienternas existentiella lidande inom rättspsykiatrisk vård2008In: Vårdvetenskapliga vägskäl / [ed] Maria Berglund, Annelie Johansson Sundler och Åsa Roxberg, Växjö: Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och socialt arbete (IVOSA), Växjö universitet , 2008, 1, p. 95-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    'The art of understanding in forensic psychiatric care': from a caring science perspective based on a lifeworld approach2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients in forensic psychiatric clinics are a vulnerable and exposed patient group due to suffering from a severe mental disorder, having committed a crime and being cared for against their will in an institutional environment with a high level of security. The art of understanding in forensic psychiatric care is discussed from a caring science perspective, based on a lifeworld approach. The aim is to contribute knowledge that can support staff, who daily meet patients on forensic psychiatric wards, in applying a caring attitude.

  • 24.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Erlingsson, Christen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Engaging with Families Is a Challenge: Beliefs among Healthcare Professionals in Forensic Psychiatric Care2015In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, p. 1-10, article id 843717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being healthcare professionals in the complex field of forensic psychiatry care (FPC) seems particularly challenging. Historically, families have almost been invisible in FPC. The aim of this study was to uncover beliefs among healthcare professionals concerning families of patients admitted for FPC. Using a hermeneutical approach inspired by Gadamer’s philosophy, group interviews with healthcare professionals in four Swedish forensic psychiatric clinics were analyzed. Analysis resulted in seven key beliefs. There were three beliefs about families: family belongingness is a resource for the patient; most families are broken and not possible to trust; and most families get in the way of the patient’s care. Four beliefs concerned encounters with families: it is important to achieve a balance and control over the family; it is essential to set aside one’s own values and morals; family-oriented work is an impossible mission; and family oriented work requires welcoming the families. Despite ethical dilemmas of working with families in FPC, healthcare professionals showed a willingness and desire to work in a more family-oriented manner. More knowledge, understanding, and caring tools are needed in order to meet the needs of the family as well as support the family’s resources.

  • 25.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Axelsson, Åsa
    Clients’ perceptions of client-nurse relationships in local authority psychiatric services:: A qualitative study.2004In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mental Health Care reform in Sweden aimed, among other things, to improve the possibilities for persons with mental illnesses to experience companionship and participation in society. The aim of the study was to describe how persons suffering from mental illness perceive their relationships with nursing staff in local authority psychiatric services. Data were collected through semi-structured recorded interviews with 17 strategically chosen clients. A qualitative approach inspired by phenomenography was used to analyse the data. The analysis resulted in four main categories and 13 subcategories. The main categories were: security, companionship, confirmation and development.

  • 26.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Holst, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andersson, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Högskolan i Borås.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Högskolan i Borås.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Högskolan i Borås.
    Lifeworld-led learning takes place in the encounter between caring science and the lifeworld2014In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning in caring contexts could be illustrated as an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and thelearner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start anintertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. The aim of this article is to illustrate themeaning of this encounter with help of a theoretical foundation and two examples of research projects with a reflective lifeworld research approach (RLR) founded on phenomenology. Both examples describe the student nurses’ perspective.One illustrates promoting learning through lifeworld-led supervision in pairs of students. The other illustrates learning environments that bridges the gap between theory and practice. These two examples show how the intertwining of caring science theory with lived experience required a certain learning and caring atmosphere that is open and sensitive for the lifeworld. In conclusion, lifeworld-led learning is more than learning per se. Lifeworld theory as a basis for supporting students’ learning could provide both a broadened and deepened understanding of the meaning of learning and also a greater understanding of how to support students’ learning.

  • 27.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Freelance Professor.
    Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline: Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 28703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault’s historical-philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-)caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault’s historical-philosophical work. The philosophical examination presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care.

  • 28.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Att använda film för att levandegöra väsentliga kunskaper för vårdande2015In: Reflektion i lärande och vård: en utmaning för sjuksköterskan / [ed] Mia Berglund & Margaretha Ekebergh, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Do you understand me?: how music and singing can create a meaningful space of importance to express and understand wellbeing and suffering2017In: European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, 20–21 April 2017: book of abstracts, 2017, p. 22-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wellbeing has many forms and can be expressed in many different ways. Earlier research has shown that using films in nursing education can support the learning of caring science, and bring a touching context for the students that can be related to nursing practice. This presentation focus on how wellbeing and suffering are expressed in the film Once by John Camey and how this can be understood in relation to caring and the support of health processes. In addition, it is of importance to educate both sensible and sensitive nurses, and we suggest that different kinds of learning strategies such as using films that touch upon existential aspects. By relating the film to the students' experiences, caring science concepts and philosophy, the understanding of human existence can be expanded and deepened. In this particular presentation we use the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty to clarify how intersubjectivity points both to the individuality and individual expression, and at the same time to the in-between and co-existence through music and singing together. Vignettes from the film are analysed in order to provide a deepened understanding of how music and singing can contribute to wellbeing and health processes.

  • 30.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Film as Support for Promoting Reflection and Learning in Caring Science2012In: Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, ISSN 2079-7222, E-ISSN 1445-7377, Vol. 12, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring science with a foundation in “the lived experience” may be viewed as a “patient science” i.e. the nursing has its starting point in the patient’s perspective. To support the students to learn caring science, the learning situation has to embrace the students’ lived experience in relation to the substance of caring science. One of the challenges in education is how to make the theoretical meanings more vivid, when there are no patients present. To obtain lived experiences as a foundation for teaching, written patient narratives and fiction like novels in combination with scientific literature are often used. Questions about how film can be used in this context to support learning of caring science have recently emerged.

     

    The aim of this study was to describe how film as learning-support may boost reflection in learning caring science. The data was collected through audio-taped seminars, written reflections and group-interviews with students on basic-, advanced-, and doctoral levels. The analysis was based on the Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach, founded on phenomenology.

     

    The result shows how film as a learning-support enhances the understanding of the caring science theory, and gives a deeper understanding of the subject. Film can be very touching and supportive for the students’ embodied reflections. Hence, it is important that the students are encouraged to watch the film from a caring science perspective and this requires a structure for learning-support related to the film, such as focus and purposes of watching the film, as well as support for follow-ups. The film per se does not create such support and guidance, but must be combined with well considered pedagogic thoughts on what learning is and how learning can be supported. The result is highlighted with the help of Maurice Merleau-Pontys philosophy of “the lived body”, and “the flesh of the world”.

  • 31.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lifeworld-Led Learning of Caring Science: Film as a Support for Learning2011In: Knowledge for Caring Science – Directions and Options, EACS Conference May 5th, 2011, 2011, p. 18-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. Borås University.
    Intertwining caring science, caring practice and caring education from a lifeworld perspective: two contextual examples2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 10363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes how caring science can be a helpful foundation for caring practice and what kind of learning supportthat can enable the transformation of caring science into practice. The lifeworld approach is fundamental for both caringand learning. This will be illustrated in two examples from research that show the potential for promoting health and wellbeingas well as the learning process. One example is from a caring context and the other is from a learning context. In thisarticle, learning and caring are understood as parallel processes. We emphasize that learning cannot be separated from lifeand thus caring and education is intertwined with caring science and life. The examples illustrate how an understanding ofthe intertwining can be fruitful in different contexts. The challenge is to implant a lifeworld-based approach on caring andlearning that can lead to strategies that in a more profound way have the potential to strengthen the person’s health andlearning processes.

  • 33.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sjögren, Reet
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    To be Strategically Struggling against Resignation: The Lived Experiences of Being Cared for in Forensic Psychiatric Care2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 743-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To be referred tocare in forensic psychiatric services can be seen as one of the mostcomprehensive encroachments society can impose upon a person’s life, as itentails a limitation of the individual’s freedom with no time limit. This study focuses upon patients’ experiences oftheir life situation in forensic psychiatric wards. Using a ReflectiveLifeworld Research approach founded in phenomenology, we analysed eleven qualitative interviews with patients cared for in a maximum security unit in a Swedish forensic psychiatric service. Results show how forensic psychiatric care canbe non-caring with only moments of good care, from the patient’s perspective.By use of different strategies, the patients struggle to adapt to the demandsof the caregivers in order to gain privileges. At the same time the patientsare lacking meaningful and close relationships and long to get away from thesystem of forensic care. Being cared for entails struggling against anapproaching overwhelming sense of resignation.

  • 34. Keen, Steven
    et al.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Caring for the understanding and use of qualitative research findings2007In: International Human Science Research Conference, Rovereto, Italien, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Methodological support for the further abstraction of and philosophical examination of empirical findings in the context of caring science2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenomena in caring science are often complex and laden with meanings. Empirical research with the aim of capturing lived experiences is one way of revealing the complexity. Sometimes, however, results from empirical research need to be further discussed. One way is to further abstract the result and/or philosophically examine it. This has previously been performed and presented in scientific journals and doctoral theses, contributing to a greater understanding of phenomena in caring science. Although the intentions in many of these publications are laudable, the lack of methodological descriptions as well as a theoretical and systematic foundation can contribute to an ambiguity concerning how the results have emerged during the analysis. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodological support for the further abstraction of and/orphilosophical examination of empirical findings. When trying to systematize the support procedures, we have used a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Based on the assumptions in RLR, this article will present methodological support for a theoretical examination that can include two stages. In the first stage, data from several (two or more) empirical results on an essential level are synthesized into a general structure. Sometimes the analysis ends with the general structure, but sometimes there is a need to proceed further. The second stage can then be a philosophical examination, in which the general structure is discussed in relation to a philosophical text, theory, or concept. It is important that the theories are brought in as the final stage after the completion of the analysis. Core dimensions of the described methodological support are, in accordance with RLR, openness, bridling, and reflection. The methodological support cannot be understood as fixed stages, but rather as a guiding light in the search for further meanings.

  • 36.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås.
    Persson, Eva I
    Lund University.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The importance of existential dimensions in the context of the presence of older patients at team meetings: In the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 26590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to explore interpersonal dimensions of the presence of older patients at team meetings.The theoretical foundation of the study is grounded in caring science and lifeworld phenomenology. The results from two empirical studies, that indicated the need for a more in-depth examination of the interpersonal relationships when an older patient is present at a team meeting, were further explicated by philosophical examination in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy. The empirical studies were performed in a hospital ward for older people, where the traditional rounds had been replaced by a team meeting, to which the patients were invited. The analysis of the general structure and philosophical examination followed the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The philosophical examination is presented in four meaning structures: mood as a force in existence; to exist in a world with others; loneliness in the presence of others;and the lived body as extending. In conclusion, professionals must consider patients’ existential issues in the way they are expressed by the patients. Existence extends beyond the present situation. Accordingly, the team meeting must be seen in a larger context, including the patients’ life as a whole, as well as the ontological and epistemological foundations on which healthcare is based.

  • 37.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Högskolan i Borås.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Persson, Eva I
    Medicinska fakulteten, Hälsa, vård och samhälle, Lunds universitet.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Högskolan i Borås.
    ‘‘It made me feel human’’: a phenomenological study of older patients’ experiences of participating in a team meeting2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, no Article number: 20714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on older patients participating in a team meeting (TM) in a hospital ward in Sweden. A process had taken place on the ward, in which the traditional round had developed into a TM and understanding what participating in a TM means for the older patient is necessary for the development of care that facilitates older patient’s participation. The aim of this study was to describe the caring, as experienced by the older patients on a ward for older persons, with a specific focus on the team meeting. A reflective lifeworld research (RLR) design was used. Fifteen patients, 12 women and three men (mean age of 82 years) were interviewed while they were hospitalized in a hospital ward for older people. In the essential meaning of the phenomenon, the TM is described as being a part of a wider context of both caring and life. The need for hospitalization is an emotional struggle to overcome vulnerability and regain everyday freedom. The way in which the professionals are able to confirm vulnerability and create a caring relationship affects both the struggle for well-being and the possibilities for maintaining dignity. The essence is further explicated through its constituents; Vulnerability limits life; Life is left in the hands of someone else; Life is a whole and Space for existence. The result raises concern about how the care needs to be adjusted to older people’s needs as lived bodies. The encounter between the carer and the patient needs to be developed in order to get away from the view of the patient as object. An expanded vision may open up for existential dimensions of what brings meaning to life. One way, as described by the patients, is via the patient’s life stories, through which the patients can be seen as a whole human being.

  • 38.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås.
    Persson, Eva I.
    University of Borås ; Lund University.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås.
    Older patients’ participation in team meeting: A phenomenological study from the nurses’ perspective2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, article id 21908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the importance of patient participation is acknowledged in today’s healthcare, many challenges remain beforepatient participation can become an integral part of care provision. The ward round has traditionally been the forum forcrucial decisions about patient care, but often with limited possibilities for patient participation. As part of the process ofimproving patient participation, the round in the present study has been replaced by a team meeting (TM) to which thepatient has been invited. The aim of this study is to highlight nurses’ experiences of older patients’ participation in TMs.The research process was guided by the principles of phenomenological reflective life world research. Data were collected in a Swedish hospital, in a ward specializing in older patients. Nine nurses, who had invited and planned for a patient toparticipate in TMs and/or had experienced TMs in which patients participated, were interviewed. The essential meaning ofpatient participation in the TM, as experienced by the nurses, is that patient participation can be supported by a saferelationship in which the patient can make his or her voice heard. Participation is challenged by the patients’ vulnerability and by the subordinated role assigned to the patient. The essential meaning is further described by its constituents: ‘‘the need for a guide,’’ ‘‘patient participation challenged by structures,’’ and ‘‘creating space for the whole human being.’’ In conclusion, the nurse plays a core role in guiding the patient in an unfamiliar situation. The meaning of patient participationin the TM needs to be discussed by professionals so that the patient perspective is present.

  • 39.
    Lundvall, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås.
    Healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversations with young adults expressing existential concerns2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This paper describes first-line department healthcare professionals’ experiences of conversations with young adults (16–25 years) who express existential concerns. Existential concerns encompass questions about the meaning of life and the choices people must make, and they are sometimes expressed during the period in which a child is becoming an adult. Sometimes the transition to adulthood can be difficult, and many young adults seek support from people in first-line departments, such as primary care providers, youth guidance centre personnel and student health service employees in high schools and universities. Conversations in which existential concerns are recognised may be important for preventing mental illness in the future.

    Aim: The study aimed to describe healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversations with young adults who express existential concerns.

    Approach and methods: This qualitative study utilises thematic meaning analysis. Interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals working in first-line departments, and data were analysed based on the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The study followed ethical codes of conduct and conformed to the ethical guidelines adopted by the Swedish Research Council.

    Findings: The results are presented in three themes of meaning: searching for innermost thoughts requires being present, uncertainty about the unpredictable and awakening of one’s own existential concerns.

    Conclusions and implications: Healthcare professionals are affected when young adults express their existential concerns, and they need more support to strengthen their ability to stay present and create inviting atmospheres.

  • 40.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Elmqvist, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    A nursing student-run health clinic: an innovative project based on reflective lifeworld-led care and education2014In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 415-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing students need support in order to be able to intertwine caring science theory with practice through reflection. In this theoretical paper a nursing student-run health clinic based on lifeworld led learning and caring is described and propounded as providing such support. The student nurses are offered possibilities for integrating theoretical and practical knowledge by the re-location of parts of the theoretical courses to this innovative learning environment. In applying a phenomenological attitude, both in the learning situation and in the caring situation, the natural (unreflective) attitude is challenged in order for the student nurses to gain a deeper and broader understanding of caring science within their caring practice and vice versa. This means that the nursing students can develop a reflective caring approach that is important in order to become both sensitive and sensible nurses. This paper can be supportive for nurse educators in developing nursing education to meet the needs of the modern society. Our perspective on health, well-being and reflective learning can also inspire persons who work in clinical practice and with health promotion.

  • 41.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Att lära sig en vårdande hållning2015In: Reflektion i lärande och vård: en utmaning för sjuksköterskan / [ed] Mia Berglund & Margaretha Ekebergh, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 69-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Caring touch: patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 834-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act.

  • 43.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The phenomenon of touch in an anthroposophic clinical context.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The phenomenon of touch in healthcare contexts: a flowing movement2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Strömwall, Annette
    et al.
    Region Kronoberg.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    “Seeing the patient as a human is their priority”: patients’ experiences of being cared for by pairs of student nurses2018In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A Developing and Learning Care Unit (DLCU) is a model used in the clinical practice of student nurses that aims at bridging the gap between theory and praxis, by supporting nursing students’ learning through supervision in pairs. The aim of this study is to describe how patients experience being cared for by pairs of student nurses. 

    Methods: The study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenological traditions. Data was collected in lifeworld interviews of 17 patients cared for by pairs of student nurses. The data was explored and analysed for meaning.

    Results: To be cared for by student nurses, supervised in pairs entails being involved in the students’ learning and being met with responsibility and a willingness to care and learn. This means being made the centre of attention, being seen, taken seriously and being listened to as a valuable human being. The students’ care is shown to be more flexible and has a more open approach, in comparison to that of the ordinary staff, and they ‘do something extraordinary’ and give of their time.

    Conclusions: Pairs of students, who are supervised within a learning model that support students’ learning through reflection, can contribute to patient experiences of being given good care.

  • 46.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Abused women’s vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: in the light of a caring science perspective2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 15-16, p. 2384-2391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective.

    Background

    Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse.

    Design and methods

    The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research.

    Findings

    Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women.

    Conclusion

    A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.

  • 47.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The unnecessary suffering and abuse caused by healthcare professionals needs to stop: a study regarding experiences of abuse among female patients in a general psychiatric setting2017In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Healthcare, from a caring science perspective, aims to support the patients’ health processes. All healthcare is, however, not experienced as being caring by the patients. Consequences of abuse in healthcare (AHC) services have effects on the patients’ health and well-being. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of abuse from healthcare professionals among female patients in a general psychiatric clinic.

    Methods: In the cross-sectional study design, data from female patients receiving outpatient or inpatient care at a general psychiatric clinic about their experiences of abuse were gathered by using the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ). Descriptive statistics were used to describe experiences of abuse in the health care sector.

    Results: Fifty-six women reported abuse by healthcare professionals. Being offended or grossly degraded while visiting health services, was experienced by almost all the women (n = 50). Experiences that a “normal” event while visiting health services suddenly became a really terrible and insulting experience, without fully knowing how this could happen was experienced by 38 women in the study. During their current care episode at the general psychiatric clinic a majority of the female patients chose not to reveal their experiences of abuse in the health care sector (n = 34).

    Conclusions: The fact that patients experience suffering and abuse from healthcare professionals is a serious problem that needs to be highlighted and discussed within all healthcare contexts. Attention needs to be paid to the suffering and abuse that is related to encounters and relationships between patients and healthcare professionals.

1 - 47 of 47
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf