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  • 1.
    Alexandersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Aronsson, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Birgitta E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Westergren, Ebbe
    Introduction2011In: Museum International, ISSN 1350-0775, E-ISSN 1468-0033, Vol. 63, no 1-2, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The papers in this issue were first presented at the interdisciplinary conference “Applied Cultural Heritage: How telling the past at historic sites benefits society” held at Linnaeus University in Kalmar, Sweden, 17-19 November 2010. The conference was organised jointly by Linnaeus University, Kalmar County Museum and Bridging Ages, International Organisation in Historic Environment Education and Time Travels. The aim of the conference was to explore how cultural heritage and stories about the past benefit society today. Given the major changes of society in recent decades and a fast developing globalisation, we proposed that it is no longer self-evident which historic sites are meaningful (and to whom), which stories about the past should be told (and why), and how cultural heritage can best benefit society (and what that means). It was therefore time to ask these questions anew and explore them together with practitioners in the heritage sector from around the world.

  • 2.
    Bailey, Douglas W.
    San Francisco State University, USA.
    Interview with Cornelius Holtorf2016In: Archaeology Today: Discussions of Themes, Goals, and Methods / [ed] Douglass W. Bailey, Târgoviște: Editura Cetatea de Scaun , 2016, p. 185-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bailey, Douglass
    San Francisco State University.
    Interview with Cornelius Holtorf2013In: Studii de Preistorie, ISSN 2065-2526, E-ISSN 2065-2534, Vol. 10, p. 7-12Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Brate, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    Hanberger, Petter
    Richardson, David (Translator)
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Places, People, Stories2012Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This graphic novel is the documentation of Places, People, Stories, a conference held at Linnaeus University in Kalmar, 28–30 September 2011. The conference was the culmination of the research project Places as Stories (see page 31) and attracted more than 175 participants from around the world, including Scandinavia, United Kingdom, USA, Japan, Argentina, Israel, India, the Marshall Islands and Australia. A wide spectrum of disciplines was represented including Anthropology, Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Business Studies, Design, Heritage Studies, History, Human Geography, Literature, Media Studies, Pedagogics, Religious Studies and Tourism Studies. Professionals working in the education, landscape and heritage sectors were also invited. The conference, which took place at the conference centre Brofästet close to the Baltic Sea, just outside the centre of Kalmar, featured four keynote lectures and more than 120 academic presentations in 18 sessions as well as six artistic contributions. Some sessions may be published separately in traditional academic formats. The conference was supported by grants received from Linnaeus University and the Swedish National Heritage Board. During the three conference days a multidisciplinary discussion took place about human narratives and their connections to places. The aim was to create a platform for unpredictable dialogues between professional scientists and artists, while providing opportunities for personal encounters and conversations that may lead to a new understanding of how cultural phenomena emerge.

  • 5. Fagan, Brian
    et al.
    Renfrew, Colin
    González Ruibal, Alfredo
    Johnson, Marilyn
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    López Luján, Leonardo
    Hamilakis, Yannis
    Cooney, Kara
    Meskell, Lynn
    Responses to a Questionnaire2015In: Archaeology for the People: Joukowsky Institute Perspectives / [ed] John Cherry, Felipe Rojas, Oxford and Philadelphia: Oxbow Books, 2015, p. 145-161Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. González-Ruibal, Alfredo
    et al.
    Harrison, Rodney
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Wilkie, Laurie
    Archaeologies of Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past: an interview with Victor Buchli and Gavin Lucas2014In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 265-276Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This interview with Victor Buchli and Gavin Lucas was undertaken over email during the Summer / Autumn of 2013 and coordinated by Alfredo González-Ruibal on behalf of the editorial team: Alfredo González-Ruibal, Rodney Harrison, Cornelius Holtorf and Laurie Wilkie. An initial set of questions was drafted and agreed amongst members of the editorial team, and a series of follow-up questions (indicated by the presence of author’s initials) were subsequently posed in cases where individuals hoped the interviewees might expand on particular points. These have been maintained in the text to allow the reader to follow the various threads which each interviewer chose to pursue.

  • 7.
    Harrison, Rodney
    et al.
    UCL Institute of Archaeology, UK.
    Bartolini, Nadja
    University of Exeter, UK.
    DeSilvey, Caitlin
    University of Exeter, UK.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lyons, Antony
    University of Exeter, UK.
    Macdonald, Sharon
    Humboldt University, Germany;University of York, UK.
    May, Sarah
    UCL Institute of Archaeology, UK.
    Morgan, Jenny
    University of York, UK.
    Penrose, Sefryn
    UCL Institute of Archaeology, UK.
    Heritage Futures2016In: Archaeology International, ISSN 1463-1725, E-ISSN 2048-4194, Vol. 19, p. 19-72, article id 2016Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage Futures is a four-year collaborative international research programme (2015–2019) funded by a UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) ‘Care for the Future’ Theme Large Grant, and supported additionally by its host universities and partner organisations. The research programme involves ambitious interdisciplinary research to explore the potential for innovation and creative exchange across a broad range of heritage and related fields, in partnership with a number of academic and non-academic institutions and interest groups. It is distinctive in its comparative approach which aims to bring heritage conservation practices of various forms into closer dialogue with the management of other material and virtual legacies such as nuclear waste management. It is also distinctive in its exploration of different forms of heritage as future-making practices. This brief paper provides an introduction to the research programme and its aims and methods.

  • 8. Harrison, Rodney
    et al.
    Wilkie, Laurie
    González-Ruibal, Alfredo
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Editorial2014In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    A Comment on Hybrid Fields and Academic Gate-Keeping.2009In: Public Archaeology, ISSN 1465-5187, E-ISSN 1753-5530, Vol. 8, no 2/3, p. 310-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The workshop on Poros which forms the basis of this collection of papers was entitled ‘Archaeological ethnographies: charting a fi eld, devising methodologies’. Both the workshop and the present volume that resulted from it constitute attempts to establish a new fi eld, with its own methodologies and its own contested practices, at the interface of several existing disciplines and fi elds of research. My comment takes the workshop on Poros and its results as a starting point but intends to raise some relevant wider issues concerning the dynamics of academic practice.

  • 10.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    A Comment on Knowledge Recovery: ’How we today can make things easier for historians/archaeologists of the future’2013In: The Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK&M) Across Generations: Improving Our Understanding,  Workshop Proceedings Issy-les-Moulineaux, France 12-13 September 2012 / [ed] H. Gordon-Smith, J. Schröder and C. Pescatore, Paris, 2013, p. 48-50Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    A European perspective on indigenous and immigrant archaeologies2009In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 672-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay scrutinizes the special status of indigenous archaeologies in contemporary world archaeology. My aim is to contribute to the future development of indigenous archaeologies by giving them the critical attention they deserve and have earned themselves. A contemporary European perspective not only shows that national heritage is no longer able to unite increasingly diverse populations but also that indigenous perspectives on the cultural heritage must not be privileged over others. What challenges and changes the role of heritage management in Europe in our age is not oppression by immigrants of indigenous minorities but, if anything, an oppression of immigrants by indigenous majorities. We should not surrender the important principles of equality and equal opportunities that modern democracies proudly embrace. Immigrants’ claims and responses to the common cultural heritage are as valid and significant as those of any other residents. As the old European nations gradually become episodes of the past, it appears that the future of heritage is wide open.

  • 12.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Academic critique and the need for an open mind (a response to Kristiansen)2008In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 490-492Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Advantages and Disadvantages of Indigenous Archaeologies: A comment on Schaepe et al, Archaeology as Therapy : Connecting Belongings, Knowledge, Time, Place, and Well-Being2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In applied form, archaeology has the potential to transform society. Schaepe, Angelbeck, Snook, and Welch discuss one way in which this potential can be fulfilled in practice, as therapy in the service of indigenous communities. 

  • 14.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Archaeology - from usefulness to value2009In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 182-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I have much sympathy for Shannon Dawdy’s eloquent argument in favour of reorienting archaeology away from reconstructions of the past and towards problems of the present (p. 140). The topic is timely, her argument sharp, and the discussion of the issues at hand benefits from them being put on the spot in rather dramatic fashion. I do not agree with those who might argue that such calls for more social relevance in a humanities subject are merely the symptom of an unhelpful but prevalent insecurity and demonstrate a lack of confidence in one’s own academic abilities. At the same time, Dawdy’s passionate and courageous argument would have benefited from additional analysis of the subject matter at hand. As it stands, I have two main reservations to her paper.

  • 15.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and cultural memory2015In: International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences / [ed] James D. Wright (editor-in-chief), Elsevier, 2015, 2, p. 881-884Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses several theoretical concepts of how collective memories function in society. An overview is given of the different implications of these concepts for both the archaeological study of ancient sites and objects, and archaeology as an academic discipline in the context of a given society or nation of the present.

  • 16.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology as "Geschichtskultur": Archäologie als Geschichtskultur2013In: Exspecto - Hanse, Mittelalter, Museologie; Zeitung des Europäischen Hansemuseums, no 2, p. 2-2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology in the Contemporary World2012In: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology / [ed] Neil A. Silberman (Editor-in-chief), Cornelius Holtorf, Alexander Bauer, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 2, p. 100-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Archaeology is a Brand! The Meaning of Archaeology in Contemporary Popular Culture2007Book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Archäologie als populäre Warenmarke in der Erlebnisgesellschaft2008In: Die Plattform, ISSN 0942-685X, Vol. 15/16, no 2006/2007, p. 138-145Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Archäologie als Prozess2009In: Leggere il tedesco per gli studi umanistici: progrediti, Venezia: Libreria Editrice Cafoscarina , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Archäologie und ihr Bild in der Alltagswelt2008In: Archäologie in Deutschland, ISSN 0176-8522, no 3, p. 64-65Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archäologie und öffentlichkeit2014In: Schlüsselbegriffe der prähistorischen archäologie / [ed] Doreen Mölders und Sabine Wolfram, Münster: Waxmann Verlag, 2014, 1, p. 39-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. UNESCO.
    Are heritage futures relevant to UNESCO?2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 23-24 November 2017 meeting, the message of the responsible UNESCO staff to the assembled UNESCO Chairs (and representatives of some other UNESCO programmes) in the area of culture came across loud and clear: UNESCO would like to receive from us concrete evidence for how culture including heritage can contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as suggested in the Agenda 2030 adopted in 2015. The United Nation’s SDGs have been specified and broken up in targets and indicators, and these should be our main reference points.

  • 24.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Are We All Archaeologists Now?: Forum in Journal of Contemporary Archaeology 2(2)2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Are We All Archaeologists Now?: Introduction2015In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 217-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The claim that “we are all archaeologists now” extends existing commitments to include into archaeological discussions the views of local communities, researchers in other disciplines, amateur researchers (citizen scientists) and other important stakeholders such as indigenous populations. However, far from all would agree that such inclusivity is indeed appropriate or sensible. The present Forum debating the question whether or not “we are all archaeologists now” demonstrates not only the diversity of viable perspectives on the practice of archaeology but also the variety of possible means of expression and indeed the vitality of archaeological questions in many realms of contemporary society. Contributions have been submitted from around the world and they encompass disciplinary perspectives from archaeology, art, architecture, Urban Studies, design, sociology and anthropology, as well as very personal accounts involving sickness, music and homelessness.

  • 26.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Arkeologi – när resan är målet2009In: Arkeologi och samhälle / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Kristina Jennbert, Cornelius Holtorf, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia , 2009, p. 125-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Assembling alternative futures for heritage2018In: Context, ISSN 0958-2746, no 155, p. 22-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Authenticity and Pastness in Cultural Heritage Management2014In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer, 2014, p. 711-713Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Authenticity and Pastness in Cultural Heritage Management2018In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Authenticity is about what you can trust to be what it purports to be, and cultural heritage is about what evokes the past in a given social con- text. Consequently, authentic cultural heritage is about what you can trust and evokes the past in society. This quality is often assessed by various ways of determining the age of the heritage in question. But dating does not sufficiently take into account the perceptions of the audience. For something to evoke the past in a given social context, it does not have to be old. Instead of focusing on age, we must therefore focus on the perceived quality of being of the past, as it is the presence or absence of this perception that deter- mines whether or not something is trusted to evoke the past in society.

  • 30.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Averting loss aversion in cultural heritage2015In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 405-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to Daniel Kahneman’s theory of loss aversion in behavioural economics and decision theory, people tend to prefer strongly avoiding losses to acquiring gains of the same value. A recently proposed alternative explanation of the same behaviour is inertia. In this paper, I am heuristically transferring these observations from the realm of economics to the realm of cultural heritage. In the cultural heritage sector of the Western world there has long been a preference for avoiding losses over acquiring gains of the same value. Maintenance of the status quo of cultural heritage is typically perceived as being superior to loss or substitution. However, social anthropologist Tim Ingold recently advocated a view that challenges this preference for loss aversion by considering both people and buildings as something persistent, continuously re-born, and constantly growing and going through a process of ever new creative transformations. By appreciating heritage objects as persistent and continuously being transformed in ongoing processes of change, growth and creation, the preference for loss aversion can be averted and a more dynamic view of cultural heritage be adopted that is better able to work through cases and examples like those presented in this paper.

  • 31.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Beyond crusades: how (not) to engage with alternative archaeologies2005In: World Archaeology, Vol. 37, p. 544-551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Can less be more? Heritage in the age of terrorism2006In: Public Archaeology, Vol. 5, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Can you hear me at the back? Archaeology, communication and society2007In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 10, no 2/3, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Caspar David Friedrich und die Megalithgräber der Romantik2009In: Archäologie in Deutschland, ISSN 0176-8522, Vol. 2009, no 2, p. 64-65Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Changing Concepts of Temporality in Cultural Heritage and Themed Environments2016In: Time and Temporality in Theme Parks / [ed] Filippo Carlà-Uhink, Florian Freitag, Sabrina Mittermeier, Ariane Schwarz, Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag, 2016, p. 115-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Theme parks and other themed environments commonly evoke stories about the past in order to provide their customers with enjoyable experiences. The underlying visions of the past can easily be dismissed as creative fiction drawing on common stereotypes. Usually, these visions are only very loosely related either to historical accounts based on academic research or to genuine cultural heritage. However, rather than dwelling on anachronisms in theme parks, I am interested in this paper in exploring discernible connections between cultural heritage and artificiality, authenticity and theming. Even cultural heritage needs to evoke stories about the past to provide visitors with enjoyable experiences. I argue that an important precondition for that to succeed is not the historical age of an observed object but its pastness. Pastness denotes the perceived quality that a given object is of the past. Pastness is not immanent in an object but may result from the object’s appearance (e.g. patina), its context (e.g. in a museum), or its correspondence with preconceived expectations among the audience. Therefore, pastness can – and indeed must – be designed and managed. There are thus important lessons to be learned from successful theme parks for cultural heritage management. I conclude by speculating about the social significance of fictitious heritage in themed environments.

  • 36.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Comment2010In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 782-783Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Comment on A. González-Ruibal, Time to destroy. An archaeology of supermodernity2008In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 265-266Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Comment on King2012In: Arqueologia Publica: Online Journal in Public Archaeology, ISSN 2171-6315, Vol. 2, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Comments on Suzie Thomas: Collaborate, Condemn, or Ignore? Responding to Non-Archaeological Approaches to Archaeological Heritage2015In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 333-334Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Creating experiences of a past reality.2010In: euroREA. (Re)construction & Experiment in Archaeology, ISSN 1214-9551, Vol. 7, p. 60-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Cultural heritage beyond culturalism2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “This land is your land, this land is my land. This land was made for you and me”, sang Lady Gaga during halftime of the 2017 Superbowl held in Houston, Texas on 5 February 2017, only one week after President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning the entry into the US of citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries that are assumed to be a security threat for the United States.

  • 42.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Der Zoo als Ort der Erinnerung2008In: Mensch, Tier und Zoo. Der Tiergarten Schönbrunn im internationalen Vergleich vom 18. Jahrhundert bis heute / [ed] Ash, Mitchell, Wien osv: Böhlau , 2008, p. 345-361Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    During the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage, the heritage sector has much to learn from nuclear waste2018In: The European Archaeologist : Newsletter of the European Association of Archaeologists., ISSN 1022–0135, Vol. 55, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    2018 is the European Year of Cultural Heritage. This “unprecedented year of events and celebrations” was put under the motto Our Heritage: Where The Past Meets The Future. But the heritage sector is rather badly prepared for the future and its challenges.

  • 44.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Ein Kommentar zu Matthias Jungs Kritik an „Citizen Science“.2015In: Forum Kritische Archäologie, ISSN 2194-346X, E-ISSN 2194-346X, Vol. 4, p. 59-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Eine Archäologie der Ideen2015In: EAZ Ethnographisch-Archäologische Zeitschrift, ISSN 0012-7477, Vol. 56, no 1/2, article id ART102391Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Embracing change: how cultural resilience is increased through cultural heritage2018In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 50, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notions of risk and resilience are increasingly relevant to cultural heritage. Archaeological sites and monuments in particular are widely perceived to be vulnerable and subjected to growing risks of deliberate destruction, e.g. in the context of armed conflicts. At the same time, it has become a familiar claim that cultural heritage needs to be conserved as an important resource for fostering cultural resilience, reducing disaster risk, and supporting peace and reconciliation in the future. In this paper, the author takes issue with that latter view and suggests instead that cultural resilience, risk preparedness, post-disaster recovery and mutual understanding between people will be best enhanced by an increased ability to accept loss and transformation. The evident changes of heritage over time can inspire people to embrace uncertainty and absorb adversity in times of change, thus increasing their cultural resilience.

  • 47.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Entre culture populaire et science, la «marque archéologique»2008In: Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie, ISSN 0242-7702, Vol. 113, no September 2008, p. 26-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Face-to-Face with the Past: Pompeii to Lejre2017In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Archaeopress, 2017, p. 175-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology has long been considered and portrayed as the discipline par excellence of things and material culture. Most valued by archaeologists and their audiences have been those sites and artefacts that are best preserved and thus seemingly allowing direct glimpses of past realities. Throughout the history of the discipline of archaeology ancient artefacts never left centre stage, although the way in which, according to the archaeologists, their significance emerged in the present has changed considerably over the decades and centuries. In this chapter I argue that over the past decade or so an alternative framework for interpreting the past and its remains has been gaining ground in contemporary society. Staged performances, scripted or improvised play and virtual simulation now allow many people face-to-face encounters with the past without the need of preserved things from antiquity. The significance of things in archaeology has changed as bodily sensations and evocative narratives are substituting for tangible evidence and hands-on experiments. Objects still play a significant role though; as props they facilitate storytelling and contribute to holistic time travel experiences. A case in point for this significant development is provided by the changing character of visitor experiences at archaeological open-air museums where the past is brought to life. This chapter is based on fieldwork at Land of Legends, Lejre, Denmark.

  • 49.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Forum on Nara+20: Heritage and Society 8 (2)2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    From Stonehenge to Las Vegas. Archaeology as Popular Culture2005Book (Other academic)
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