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  • 1.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    et al.
    Dept. of Comput. Intell. & Syst. Sci., Tokyo Inst. of Technol., Tokyo, Japan.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Saunders, Joe
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Nehaniv, Chrystopher
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Helping Robots Imitate: Metrics And Computational Solutions Inspired By Human-Robot Interaction Studies2010In: Advances in Cognitive Systems / [ed] Samia Nefti-Meziani and John Gray, Institution of Engineering and Technology, 2010, p. 127-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we describe three lines of research related to the issue of helping robots imitate people. These studies are based on observed human be- haviour, technical metrics and implemented technical solutions. The three lines of research are: (a) a number of user studies that show how humans naturally tend to demonstrate a task for a robot to learn, (b) a formal approach to tackle the problem of what a robot should imitate, and (c) a technology-driven conceptual framework and technique, inspired by social learning theories, that addresses how a robot can be taught. In this merging exercise we will try to propose a way through this prob- lem space, towards the design of a Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) system able to be taught by humans via demonstration.

  • 2.
    Cernea, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Kaiserslautern.
    Mora, Simone
    Norwegian University of Science.
    Perez, Alfredo
    Norwegian University of Science.
    Ebert, Achim
    University of Kaiserslautern.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Divitini, Monica
    Norwegian University of Science.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics. University of Minho, Portugal.
    Tangible and Wearable User Interfaces for Supporting Collaboration among Emergency Workers2012In: Collaboration and Technology: 18th International Conference, CRIWG 2012 Raesfeld, Germany, September 16-19, 2012 Proceedings / [ed] Valeria Herskovic, H. Ulrich Hoppe, Marc Jansen, Jürgen Ziegler, Springer, 2012, Vol. 7493, p. 192-199Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ensuring a constant flow of information is essential for offeringquick help in different types of disasters. In the following, we report on a workin-progress distributed, collaborative and tangible system for supporting crisismanagement. On one hand, field operators need devices that collect information—personal notes and sensor data—without interrupting their work. Onthe other hand, a disaster management system must operate in different scenariosand be available to people with different preferences, backgrounds and roles.Our work addresses these issues by introducing a multi-level collaborative systemthat manages real-time data flow and analysis for various rescue operators.

  • 3.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Daniel, Spikol
    Malmö University.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring Teachers’ perspectives on the use of Mobile devices for Math and Language Learning2014In: Conference proceedings: 4th international Designs for Learning conference, 6-9th May 2014, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Purposeful Learning Across Collaborative Educational Spaces2014In: Learning and becoming in practice: The International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2014 : Proceedings, Volume 3, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2014, Vol. 3, p. 1597-1598Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the overall goals and preliminary results of an on-going research project that aims at: understanding the intricacies and complexities of introducing mobile technologies into schools’ curriculum and accepted teaching practices; analyzing actual transformations that the use of mobile technologies in schools brings to contemporary forms of learning. The results of the project will contribute to a better understanding of new media literacies and their implications for curriculum design and everyday educational practices.

  • 5.
    Davis, Megan
    et al.
    Hertfordshire University, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    Hertfordshire University, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    Hertfordshire University, UK.
    Nehaniv, Chrystopher L
    Hertfordshire University, UK.
    Powell, Stuart D
    Hertfordshire University, UK.
    Creating a software to promote understanding about narrative in children with autism: Reflecting on the design of feedback and opportunities to reason2007In: IEEE 6th International Conference on Development and Learning, 2007. ICDL 2007., IEEE conference proceedings, 2007, p. 64-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TouchStory is a software game that aims at improving the understanding of narrative by children withautism. In fact, the underlying conceptual framework intends to investigate to what extent we can improve the children's understanding of narrative through the introduction of simple game-like tasks that address primitive components of narrative. The game has strong analogies with the concrete, physical world. Our design approach, following our knowledge regarding this particular group of learners, was to'keep things simple', introducing features only if necessary to provide each individual child with a focussed and enjoyable game, from which that particular child may learn about, or absorb, (or become more familiar with) primitive components of narrative. In this paper we concentrate on issues of reward, feedback, and opportunities for reasoning (about the task and/or their own performance) provided bysoftware. We present results from the first 7 visits of an ongoing longitudinal study involving 6 childreneach with a diagnosis of autism. We consider the children's apparent engagement with TouchStory, and in particular, we focus on the strategy each child adopts and consequent feedback from the software. This analysis prompted us to further reflect on the specificities of this group of children and the challenges to create supportive learning environments.

  • 6.
    Dibra, Dorina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Real-time interactive visualization aiding pronunciation of English as a second language2014In: 2014 14TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADVANCED LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES (ICALT), IEEE Press, 2014, p. 436-440Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some studies have been reporting encouraging results concerning the possibilities of combining voice and its visual representation for language learning. Following this line of investigation this paper explores the potential impact of two distinct visualization styles for the learning of English pronunciation of syllables for non-native speakers: a) highlighting syllables and b) the visualization of the produced sound wave. In order to evaluate the benefits of the two different styles three distinct digital tool prototypes were created in order to test four study conditions. The conditions under evaluation were a) teaching syllables without the support of any digital tool; b) teaching using a prototype that highlighted the syllables under study; c) using a prototype that displayed the sound wave of the syllable to be learnt and d) a prototype that combined the functionality of b) and c). Results suggest that the combined approach seems to be as effective as the traditional classroom approach of teaching the syllables. However, more research is needed in order to consolidate the findings, being able to explore in more detail how is the learning process occurring and to what extend the tools developed can be integrated into classroom practice.

  • 7.
    Ferreira, Joao Pedro
    et al.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Sousa, Marta Noronha
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Branco, Nuno
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Ferreira, Manuel Joao
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics. University of Minho, Portugal.
    Zagalo, Nelson
    University of Minho.
    Branco, Pedro
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Thin slices of interaction: predicting users' task difficulty within 60 sec2012In: Proceedings CHI '12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press, 2012, p. 171-180Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on an exploratory study where the first 60 seconds of the video recording of a user interaction are used to predict the user’s experienced task difficulty. This approach builds on previous work on “thin slices” of human-human behavior, and applies it to human- computer interaction. In the scenario of interacting with a photocopy machine, automated video coding showed that the Activity and Emphasis predicted 46.6% of the variance of task difficulty. This result closely follows reported results on predicting negotiation outcomes from conversational dynamics using similar variables on the speech signal.

  • 8.
    Jansen, Marc
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). University of Applied Sciences Ruhr West, Germany.
    Kohen-Vacs, Dan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). Holon Institute of Technology (HIT), Israel.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). ISCTE Lisbon University Institute, Portugal.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    A Complementary View for Better Understanding the Term Computational Thinking2018In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Computational Thinking Education 2018, Hong Kong: The Education University of Hong Kong , 2018, p. 2-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term Computational Thinking is closely related to efforts connected to teach a systematic and well-structured way of problem solving that includes a set of tools and techniques used in Computer Science. While substantial research in this field has shown promising outcomes concerning distinct intervention programs and teaching initiatives, the term Computational Thinking itself requires to be revised in order to get a wider consensus about its meaning and purpose. This paper contributes to the ongoing quest concerning the definition of the term by starting with a fundamental perspective on computational theory and corresponding concepts in order to describe the theoretical building blocks of a systematic view to further elaborate on an approach for teaching and learning about Computational Thinking. Additionally, based on this foundational effort, more advanced concepts are presented and discussed in order to better understand this domain. Finally, the paper identifies and discusses a set of relevant challenges taking a cognitive psychology perspective on Computational Thinking.

  • 9.
    José, Rui
    et al.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Cardoso, Jorge
    Portuguese Catholic University, Portugal.
    Dimensions of situatedness for digital public displays2014In: Advances in Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1687-5893, E-ISSN 1687-5907, article id 474652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public displays are often strongly situated signs deeply embedded in their physical, social, and cultural setting. Understanding how the display is coupled with on-going situations, its level of situatedness, provides a key element for the interpretation of the displays themselves but is also an element for the interpretation of place, its situated practices, and its social context. Most digital displays, however, do not achieve the same sense of situatedness that seems so natural in their nondigital counterparts. This paper investigates people’s perception of situatedness when considering the connection between public displays and their context. We have collected over 300 photos of displays and conducted a set of analysis tasks involving focus groups and structured interviews with 15 participants. The contribution is a consolidated list of situatedness dimensions that should provide a valuable resource for reasoning about situatedness in digital displays and informing the design and development of display systems.

  • 10.
    José, Rui
    et al.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Izadi, Shahram
    Microsoft Research.
    Harper, Richard
    Microsoft Research.
    Instant Places: Using Bluetooth for Situated Interaction in Public Displays2008In: IEEE pervasive computing, ISSN 1536-1268, E-ISSN 1558-2590, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public digital displays are increasingly pervasive and an important enabling technology for many types of ubiquitous computing scenarios. Not only do they provide a simple and effective way of bringing digital information into our physical world, but their presence could also be a catalyst for situated interaction and the emergence of local user-generated content. This paper explores the role of presence, particularly as enabled by Bluetooth device discovery, as the driver for the system's behavior and its situational awareness.

  • 11.
    José, Rui
    et al.
    Algoritmi Center, University of Minho.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Rodrigues, Helena
    Algoritmi Center, University of Minho.
    Meneses, Filipe
    Algoritmi Center, University of Minho.
    Coelho, Odete
    Algoritmi Center, University of Minho.
    Exploring the Design Space of Mobile Payment Systems2013In: ADVANCES IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES / [ed] Rocha, Álvaro and Correia, Ana Maria and Wilson, Tom and Stroetmann, Karl A., Springer, 2013, p. 1095-1104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an exploratory study on the design space for mobile payments. The study aims at identifying how some features of potential systems may affect the end-user experience and the overall values associated with it. This work takes an interaction design perspective and is not particularly focused on usability or task efficiency issues. Instead, we provide a set of concepts towards the generation of a framework about the Human values involved in mobile payments. The proposed framework and the results from users’ interviews provide an added-value for anyone designing mobile payment systems. The resources presented should facilitate the reasoning about the major sensitivities involved in mobile payments as well as initial reflections of their implications.

  • 12.
    José, Rui
    et al.
    Department of Information Systems, University of Minho, Portugal.
    Rodrigues, Helena
    Department of Information Systems, University of Minho.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ambient Intelligence: Beyond the Inspiring Vision2010In: Journal of universal computer science (Online), ISSN 0948-695X, E-ISSN 0948-6968, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 1480-1499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) has emerged in the past 10 years as a multidisciplinary field within ubiquitous computing, attracting considerable research, funding and public attention and leading to many research groups, and conferences specifically focused on Ambient Intelligence topics. From its conception, AmI has always been a field strongly driven by a particular vision of how ICT technologies would shape our future. This has given the AmI vision, essentially as proposed by ISTAG, an excessively central role in shaping the field and setting its research agenda. We argue that this inspiring vision should no longer be the main driver for AmI research and that we should now re-interpret its role in the background of 10 years of research.

    In this paper, we reflect on what it means for AmI to move behind its foundational vision and we identify a number of emerging trends around some of its core concepts, more specifically the notion of intelligence, the system view and the requirements process. The main motivation is to search for alternative research directions that may be more effective in delivering today the essence of the AmI vision, even if they mean abandoning some of the currently prevailing approaches and assumptions. Overall, these trends provide a more holistic view of AmI and may represent important contributions for bringing this field closer to realisation, delivery and real social impact.

  • 13.
    Keller, Damián
    et al.
    Amazon Center for Music Research – NAP, Brazil.
    Miletto, Evandro M
    IFRS, Brazil.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Creative Surrogates: Supporting Decision-Making in Ubiquitous Musical Activities2015In: xCoAx 2015: Proceedings of the Third Conference on Computation, Communication, Aesthetics and X / [ed] Alison Clifford, Miguel Carvalhais & Mario Verdicchio, xCoAx , 2015, p. 168-183Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present results of two studies that address creative decision-making through the usage of local resources. Adopting anopportunistic design approach (Buxton 2007; Botero et al. 2010;Visser 1994), both studies use off-the-shelf infrastructure toidentify support strategies that deserve further implementationefforts. Both studies yielded complete creative products, consistingof a mixed-media performance artwork and a multimodalinstallation. We discuss the procedures employed to assist thedecision-making processes with an eye on the development ofnew creativity support metaphors. The examples serve to framethe discussion on human-computer interaction and musical creativityin the context of ubiquitous music making.

  • 14.
    Keller, Damián
    et al.
    Amazon Centre for Music Research NAP Federal University of Acre, Brazil.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Costalonga, Leandro
    Federal University of Espírito Santo, Brazil.
    Aesthetic Heuristics in Ubimus2015In: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2015). London, UK, 7 - 9 July 2015, British Computer Society (BCS), 2015, p. 64-71Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose aesthetic heuristics as an area of study within ubiquitous music research. Initially we discuss the motivations for narrowing the focus of the experimental variables involved in creativity-centred design studies. Then we place aesthetic heuristics within the current efforts toward designs for creativity support, highlighting recent studies that target everyday musical creativity. The reviewed experimental results point to a gap between the current theoretical proposals in musical creativity and the factors that impact everyday musical activities. Self-referentiality of the experimental-theoretical construct and early domain restriction are two of the limitations pointed out by previous theoretical work. We provide a working definition of aesthetic heuristics, indicating its object of study and its rationale. We also lay out initial experimental strategies. Potential contributions from interaction aesthetics and ubimus research are discussed, introducing the concept of creative bias and a set of experimental hypotheses. The last section of the paper furnishes examples of creative biases within the context of musical interaction design.

  • 15.
    Keller, Damián
    et al.
    Federal University of Acre, Brazil.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Lazzarini, Victor
    National University of Ireland, Ireland.
    Pimenta, Marcelo Soares
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    de Lima, Maria Helena
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Johann, Marcelo
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Costalonga, Leandro
    Federal University of Espirito Santo, Brazil.
    Interaction Aesthetics and Ubiquitous Music2015In: Creativity in the Digital Age / [ed] Nelson Zagalo and Pedro Branco, Springer, 2015, p. 91-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two recent approaches to interaction design have good potential to address creative practice in everyday settings: interaction aesthetics and ubiquitous music. We discuss the theoretical and methodological issues raised by both perspectives and highlight the similarities and differences among the two approaches. Through the analysis of a series of experiments, a common theme emerges: relational properties may provide a useful target for creativity-oriented experimental work.

  • 16.
    Koay, K L
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Zivkovic, Z
    University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kröse, B
    University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Dautenhahn, K
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Walters, M L
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Alissandrakis, A
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Methodological Issues of Annotating Vision Sensor Data using Subjects' Own Judgement of Comfort in a Robot Human Following Experiment2006In: The 15th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, 2006. ROMAN 2006., IEEE conference proceedings, 2006, p. 66-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When determining subject preferences for human-robot interaction, an important issue is the interpretation of the subjects' responses during the trials. Employing a non-intrusive approach, this paper discusses the methodological issues for annotating vision data by allowing the subjects to indicate their comfort using a handheld comfort level device during the trials. In previous research, the analysis of collected comfort and vision data was made difficult due to problems concerning the manual synchronization of different modalities. In the current paper, we overcome this issue by real-time integration of the subject's feedback on subjective comfort into the video stream. The implications for more efficient analysis of human-robot interaction data, as well as possible future developments of this approach are discussed

  • 17.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway ; Open Univ Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Miltiadous, Miltos
    Open Univ Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Libbrecht, Paul
    Univ Educ, Germany.
    Mueller, Wolfgang
    Univ Educ, Germany.
    Hadzilacos, Thanasis
    Open Univ Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Ctr Invest & Intervencao Social CIS IUL, Portugal.
    Barth, Karl
    Univ Educ, Germany.
    Georgiou, Koula
    Open Univ Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Let me do it: towards the implementation of sustainable instructional patterns2016In: 2016 IEEE 16TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADVANCED LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES (ICALT), IEEE, 2016, p. 414-415Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the design of an online environment providing mechanisms for the exploitation of school ICT infrastructure by empowering teachers to discover and comment on educational activities (patterns, scenarios, experience reports) that can be implemented in their schools. To this end, our design approach will make explicit the linking between the patterns, the learning scenarios and other contextual information. The online environment will not only serve as a repository of educational activities but will help schools to analyze their infrastructure, to select proper scenarios that effectively exploit it and, potentially, to enrich these scenarios by commenting on them.

  • 18.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Beyond Rationality: Affective and Emotional Effects on External Representations in Seamless Learning2009In: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] Kong, S.C., Ogata, H., Arnseth, H. C., Chan, C. K. K., Hirashima, T., Klett, F., Lee, J. H. M., Liu, C. C., Looi, C. K., Milrad, M., Mitrovic, T., Nakabayashi, K., Wong, S. L., Yang, S. J. H., Hong Kong: Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education , 2009, p. 564-568Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we re-visit different theoretical and conceptual issues that havebeen influencing the design of educational technology artifacts. In particular, we take intoconsideration recent perspectives in cognitive science that acknowledge the importanteffects of external representations in learning and discuss the challenges regarding theapplicability of these ideas in connection to seamless learning environments. Extending theprevious work revised here, the current paper suggests that in order to further understandthe nature of learning in these novel contexts, research needs to investigate howsocio-affective factors come to the fore and influence the co-construction and use ofexternal representations “in the wild”.

  • 19.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, Portugal.
    There is more to come: Anticipating content on interactive public displays through timer animations2016In: PerDis 2016: Proceedings of the 5th ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, ACM Press, 2016, p. 247-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experience a continuously growing number of public displays deployed in a diverse range of settings. Often these displays contain a variety of full-screen content for the audience that is organized by a scheduler application. However, such public display systems often miss to communicate their full set of content and features, neither do they hint schedule information. In this paper, we present and describe a timer control we implemented in our public display applications to communicate schedule and application information to the audience, which allows to manage expectations and anticipation around public displays. We also report initial insights from studies about how this kind of design features supported the audience in engaging with the public displays.

  • 20.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Application features to convey peers' interactions to engage users in a display network2015In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2015, p. 267-268Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent socio-technological developments have shown growing interest in interactive pervasive computing scenarios supported by public displays. One of the main challenges in the design of public display systems still is to engage users to interact and be motivated to do so. In this work, we describe application features, implemented in our public display system, which aim to convey awareness of local and remote peers' interactions with an educational video installation to engage users to interact. This is facilitated by dynamic pop-up notifications and visualizations of interactions on the display screen. A first deployment and study showed that users found these presentations of peer interactions to be engaging, both with the display system as well as the social context around it.

  • 21.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Evaluating usage patterns and adoption of an interactive video installation on public displays in school contexts2014In: MUM '14 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2014, p. 160-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in supporting learning activities/scenarios that go beyond the traditional classroom context as well as the development of pervasive computing scenarios supported by display installations. In order to explore such interactive scenarios that span video-based learning activities across school contexts, we have developed two web-based functional prototypes of public display applications and performed a field evaluation during an initial test-deployment. The system consists of a public display endpoint providing video content enriched with quizzes related to this content, and a mobile endpoint providing interactivity and user participation. During a three weeks test-deployment at two Swedish schools, the display system was evaluated and important requirements for the next iterations were gathered. This work presents the results of the test-deployment and the users' adoption (usage patterns), and discusses the specialties of introducing such a system into educational environments. The deployment and the corresponding study enabled us to validate in real settings the overall technical approach and to test different perspectives of display usage. The conclusions point to the need to further understand how to promote an integrated view of display utilization in schools.

  • 22.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Increasing user engagement with distributed public displays through the awareness of peer interactions2015In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2015, p. 23-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments have shown a growing interest in interactive pervasive computing scenarios supported by public displays as well as their introduction into educational environments. Still, one of the biggest challenges in the design of public display systems is to engage users to interact and be motivated to do so. In this paper, we report a study exploring the potential effect of the awareness of peers' interactions with an educational video installation and the popularity of the display system on the user engagement. The awareness is facilitated by pop-up notifications and visualizations of interactions on the display screen. We conducted a six day long deployment of our system which included a diary study, during which we altered the display's dynamic behavior in order to test different conditions. The analysis of the diary reports and the progression of the users' interactions showed that the users found the presentations of peer interactions to be engaging, both with the display system as well as the social context around it.

  • 23.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Inst Univ Lisboa, Portugal.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Shared Interactive Music Experiences in Public Spaces: User Engagement and Motivations2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Conference on Interactive Surfaces and Spaces, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 287-296Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent development and distribution of interactive pervasive computing systems, especially those incorporating digital public displays, facilitate a variety of new interactive scenarios in shared public spaces where people gather and spend time to enjoy a social experience. Integrating novel interaction mechanisms related to the sharing and listening of music with digital displays is a good example of the potential of using current technologies to enhance physical and social spaces. This paper explores the design and impact of shared situated interactive systems, combining public display installations with a collaborative music player. To explore the design space of these systems, we conducted two studies involving the deployment of a particular system at different venues. The analysis of our results allowed us to identify specific (group) interactions and events, which were fostered by the system under consideration. Based on these outcomes, we propose a set of features that should foster further engagement with such systems and promote new ways of social interaction.

  • 24.
    Müller, Wolfgang
    et al.
    University of Education Weingarten.
    Iurgel, Ido
    CCG, Portugal.
    Otero, Nuno
    DSI System Information Dept. and EngageLab, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800, Guimarães, Portugal.
    Massler, Ute
    Unversity of Education Weingarten.
    Teaching English as a second language utilizing authoring tools for interactive digital storytelling2010In: Interactive Storytelling: Third Joint Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2010, Edinburgh, UK, November 1-3, 2010. Proceedings / [ed] Ruth Aylett, Mei Yii Lim, Sandy Louchart et al., Springer, 2010, p. 222-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents first results from an ongoing research initiative to develop an interactive storytelling application to support teaching English as a second language for children in schools. Considering the necessity to accommodate to both students’ and teachers’ needs, we provide a summarized review of relevant systems and discuss the envisioned challenges concerning the specific aim we are addressing. Furthermore, we present different usage scenarios closely related to the concept of role playing and its application within this problem space.

  • 25.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Nehaniv, Chrystopher
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Syrdal, Dag Sverre
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Koay, Kheng Lee
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Human to Robot Demonstrations of Routine Home Tasks: Exploring the Role of the Robot’s Feedback2008In: Proceedings of the 2008 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), IEEE conference proceedings, 2008, p. 177-184Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore some conceptual issues, relevant for the design of robotic systems aimed at interacting with humans in domestic environments. More specifically, we study the role of the robot's feedback (positive or negative acknowledgment of understanding) on a human teacher's demonstration of a routine home task (laying a table). Both the human and the system's perspectives are considered in the analysis and discussion of results from a human-robot user study, highlighting some important conceptual and practical issues. These include the lack of explicitness and consistency on people's demonstration strategies. Furthermore, we discuss the need to investigate design strategies to elicit people's knowledge about the task and also successfully advertize the robot's abilities in order to promote people's ability to provide appropriate demonstrations.

  • 26.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Müller, Maximilian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Lencastre, José Alberto
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Casal, João
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    José, Rui
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Promoting secondary school learners' curiosity towards science through digital public displays2013In: Proceedings of International Conference on Making Sense of Converging Media, AcademicMindTrek '13 / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, Heljä Franssila, Janne Paavilainen, Hannu Kärkkäinen, ACM Press, 2013, no 470, p. 204-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the understanding of how digital public displays can be utilized in schools taking into consideration educational goals. This work is part of a currently on-going research project that aims to promote students' curiosity in science and technology through creative film-making, collaborative editing activities, and content sharing. In order to explore the design space concerning digital public displays for schools' contexts, six workshops with secondary school teachers in two different countries were conducted to elicit sensitivities towards possible features and interaction techniques as well as inquire about expectations and technology adoption. Our findings suggest that teachers are receptive to the technology and were able to generate scenarios that take advantage of the possibilities offered by digital public displays to stimulate learning processes. However, there are several crucial elements regarding management and control of content that need to be carefully crafted/designed in order to accommodate each schools' organizational issues.

  • 27.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    José, Rui
    Dep. Information Systems, University of Minho, Portugal.
    Considering Worth and Human Values in the Design of Digital Public Displays2011In: Emerging Pervasive and Ubiquitous Aspects of Information Systems: Cross-Disciplinary Advancements / [ed] Judith Symonds, IGI Global, 2011, p. 248-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development and design of computational artifacts and their current widespread use in diverse contexts needs to take into account end-users needs, likes/dislikes and broader societal issues including human values. However, the fast pace of technological developments highlights that the process of defining the computational artifacts not only needs to understand the user but also consider engineers and designers’ creativity. Taking into account these issues, we have been exploring the adoption of the Worth-Centred Design (WCD) framework, proposed by Gilbert Cockton, to guide our development efforts regarding digital public displays. This chapter presents our insights as a design team regarding the use of the WCD framework and discusses our current efforts to extend the adoption of the framework. Finally, future steps are considered, and will focus on enriching our understanding concerning potential places for digital displays, stakeholders’ views, encouraging open participation and co-creation.

  • 28.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics. University of Minho, Portugal.
    José, Rui
    University of Minho. Portugal.
    Silva, Bruno
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Interactive public digital displays: investigating its use in a high school context2012In: On the Move to Meaningful Internet Systems: OTM 2012 Workshops: Confederated International Workshops: OTM Academy, Industry Case Studies Program, EI2N, INBAST, META4eS, OnToContent, ORM, SeDeS, SINCOM, and SOMOCO 2012, Rome, Italy, September 10-14, 2012. Proceedings / [ed] Pilar Herrero, Hervé Panetto, Robert Meersman & Tharam Dillon, Springer, 2012, p. 617-626Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a longitudinal user study that investigated the adoption of some Bluetooth based functionalities for a public digital display in a high school. More specifically, the utilization of Bluetooth device naming extended beyond social identity representation and introduced the use of a simple interaction mechanism. The interaction mechanism involves recognizing parts of the Bluetooth device name as explicit instructions to trigger the generation of content on an interactive public display. Together with representatives of the teachers’ community, the design team defined some social rules concerning usage in order to account for the specificities of the place. In the user study, three fully functional prototypes were deployed at the school hall of the high school. The functionalities introduced with the different prototypes were: the visualization on the display of the Bluetooth device names, the possibility to contribute to tag clouds and the possibility to choose icons from a given set for self-expression. The results suggest that people appropriated some but not all of the functionalities employed. Implications of our findings to the design of interactive digital displays are pointed out.

  • 29.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Knoop, Steffen
    University of Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Nehaniv, Chrystopher L
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Syrdal, Dag
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dillmann, Rüdiger
    University of Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Distribution and Recognition of Gestures in Human-Robot Interaction2006In: The 15th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, 2006. ROMAN 2006., IEEE conference proceedings, 2006, p. 103-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an approach for human activity recognition focusing on gestures in a teaching scenario, together with the setup and results of user studies on human gestures exhibited in unconstrained human-robot interaction (HRI). The user studies analyze several aspects: the distribution of gestures, relations, and characteristics of these gestures, and the acceptability of different gesture types in a human-robot teaching scenario. The results are then evaluated with regard to the activity recognition approach. The main effort is to bridge the gap between human activity recognition methods on the one hand and naturally occuring or at least acceptable gestures for HRI on the other. The goal is two-fold: to provide recognition methods with information and requirements on the characteristics and features of human activities in HRI, and to identify human preferences and requirements for the recognition of gestures in human-robot teaching scenarios

  • 30.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Rogers, Yvonne
    Department of Mathematics and Computing, Open University, United Kingdom.
    Santos, António J.
    UIPCDE, ISPA Instituto Universitário, Portugal.
    Verissimo, Manuela
    UIPCDE, ISPA Instituto Universitário, Portugal.
    Torres, Nuno
    UIPCDE, ISPA Instituto Universitário, Portugal.
    Challenges in Designing Seamless Learning Scenarios: Affective and Emotional Effects on External Representations2011In: International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation, ISSN 1746-725X, E-ISSN 1746-7268, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 15-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we revisit different theoretical and conceptual issues that have been influencing the design of educational technology artefacts. In particular, we take into consideration recent perspectives in cognitive science that acknowledge the important effects of external representations (ERs) in learning and discuss the challenges regarding the applicability of these ideas in connection to seamless-learning environments. Extending the previous work revised here, this paper suggests that in order to further understand the nature of learning in these novel contexts, research needs to investigate how socio-affective factors come to the fore and influence the co-construction and use of ERs 'in the wild'.

  • 31.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    INESC-ID, Portugal.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Vala, André
    INESC-ID, Portugal.
    Paiva, Ana
    INESC-ID, Portugal.
    BeLife: a simulation tool to support learning about photosynthesis2005In: Proceedings of the 2005 conference on Towards Sustainable and Scalable Educational Innovations Informed by the Learning Sciences: Sharing Good Practices of Research, Experimentation and Innovation, IOS Press, 2005, p. 857-860Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a multi-agent based interactive learning environment called BeLife. BeLife intends to support learning scientific concepts related to photosynthesis, plant growth and greenhouse management. One of the main objectives of the development of BeLife is to create an interactive learning environment that combines modelling and simulation learning tasks in one tool. We present the initial findings from a case study conducted in a classroom setting with high school students. The study evaluated the usability of a high fidelity prototype of the system. We elaborate on these results and discuss the adequacy of BeLife envisioned functionalities and its applicability.

  • 32.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Müller, Maximilian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring video-based interactions around digital public displays to foster curiosity about science in schools2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this poster, we describe our initial steps towards understanding how digital public displays in schools can be utilized in order to foster students' curiosity towards scientific topics. More specically, this present work is part of an on-going research project (JuxtaLearn) that aims at provoking students' curiosity in science and technology through creative lmmaking and editing activities. In order to explore the design space concerning digital public displays for schools' contexts we conducted some initial workshops with science teachers in order to elicit their sensitivities towards possible features and interaction techniques, as well as to inquire about expectations and technology adoption.

  • 33.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Hertfordshire University, UK.
    Nehaniv, Chrystopher L
    Syrdal, Dag
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    Naturally Occurring Gestures in a Human-Robot Teaching Scenario2006In: The 15th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, 2006. ROMAN 2006., IEEE conference proceedings, 2006, p. 533-540Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our general framework for the investigation of how human gestures can be used to facilitate the interaction and communication between humans and robots. More specifically, a study was carried out to reveal which "naturally occurring" gestures can be observed in a scenario where users had to explain to a robot how to perform a specific home task. The study followed a within-subjects design where ten participants had to demonstrate how to lay a table for two people using two different methods for their explanation: utilizing only gestures or gestures and speech. The experiments also served to validate a new coding scheme for human gestures in human-robot interaction, with good inter-rater reliability. Moreover, annotated video corpus was produced and characteristics such as frequency, duration, and co-occurrence of the different gestural classes have been gathered in order to capture requirements for the designers of HRI systems. The results regarding the frequencies of the different gestural types suggest an interaction between the order of presentation of the two methods and the actual type of gestures produced. Moreover, the results also suggest that there might be an interaction between the type of task and the type of gestures produced

  • 34.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Oakley, Ian
    Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Republic of Korea.
    External representations and the design of seamless learning systems: Toward a conceptual framework to analyze empirical evidence regarding learning benefits2019In: Seamless Learning: Perspectives, Challenges and Opportunities / [ed] Chee-Kit LooiLung-Hsiang WongChristian GlahnSu Cai, Springer, 2019, p. 53-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current trends in technology-enhanced learning highlight the increasing importance of mobile digital tools in learning scenarios; seamless learning, or learning that spans contexts and activities within and without the classroom, is becoming mainstream. Despite the growing body of the literature in this area, this chapter highlights a general focus on technological issues and perspectives and a lack of theoretically driven discussion. We argue that theoretically/conceptually inspired literature reviews covering pedagogy and cognitive aspects of learning are currently needed to establish a grounded framework for future research in this area. This paper contributes one such analysis—it proposes and reflects on the issues raised when considering seamless learning from the perspective of the established literature on external representations (ERs), a core concept in distributed or embodied accounts of cognition. Core issues we discuss are: (a) what are the challenges facing seamless learning from an ERs perspective? (b) how can knowledge about ERs be applied to seamless learning systems?, and (c) what methodological challenges will emerge if seamless learning systems are studied from the perspective of ERs? This discussion is intended as a bridge between practical and applied work in seamless learning and theoretical or laboratory-based work in ERs—it seeks to drive the field of seamless learning forward by highlighting best practices from an established theoretical perspective. By elaborating on a theoretically grounded lens, we seek to empower researchers to identify promising approaches for the design and evaluation of next-generation high impact seamless learning solutions. © 2019, Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

  • 35.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Saunders, Joe
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Nehaniv, Chrystopher L
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Teaching robot companions: the role of scaffolding and event structuring2008In: Connection science (Print), ISSN 0954-0091, E-ISSN 1360-0494, Vol. 20, no 2-3, p. 111-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For robots to be more capable interaction partners they will necessarily need to adapt to the needs and requirements of their human companions. One way that the human could aid this adaptation may be by teaching the robot new ways of doing things by physically demonstrating different behaviours and tasks such that the robot learns new skills by imitating the learnt behaviours in appropriate contexts. In human–human teaching, the concept of scaffolding describes the process whereby the teacher guides the pupil to new competence levels by exploiting and extending existing competencies. In addition, the idea of event structuring can be used to describe how the teacher highlights important moments in an overall interaction episode. Scaffolding and event structuring robot skills in this way may be an attractive route in achieving robot adaptation; however, there are many ways in which a particular behaviour might be scaffolded or structured and the interaction process itself may have an effect on the robot's resulting performance. Our overall research goal is to understand how to design an appropriate human–robot interaction paradigm where the robot will be able to intervene and elicit knowledge from the human teacher in order to better understand the taught behaviour. In this article we examine some of these issues in two exploratory human–robot teaching scenarios. The first considers task structuring from the robot's viewpoint by varying the way in which a robot is taught. The experimental results illustrate that the way in which teaching is carried out, and primarily how the teaching steps are decomposed, has a critical effect on the efficiency of human teaching and the effectiveness of robot learning. The second experiment studies the problem from the human's viewpoint in an attempt to study the human teacher's spontaneous levels of event segmentation when analysing their own demonstrations of a routine home task to a robot. The results suggest the existence of some individual differences regarding the level of granularity spontaneously considered for the task segmentation and for those moments in the interaction which are viewed as most important.

  • 36.
    Prada, Rui
    et al.
    IST-Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Otero, Nuno
    IST-Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Paiva, Ana
    IST-Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    The User in the Group: Evaluating the Effects of Autonomous Group Dynamics2007In: Proceedings of the international conference on Advances in computer entertainment technology: ACE '07, ACM Digital Library, 2007, p. 25-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous characters in virtual environments have the potential to improve the interaction experience of users, specially, their social experience. This effect is driven by the interactions occurring between users and the autonomous characters, that in certain scenarios can be in the context of a group. However, for these group interactions to be successful, it is not enough to assure that the autonomous characters behave in a coherent manner from an individual perspective, but it is also necessary that they exhibit behaviours that are coherent with the group composition, context and structure. Therefore, we have developed a model to support believable group dynamics of autonomous characters, inspired in theories developed in human social psychological sciences. This model defines the knowledge that each individual should build about the others and about the group it belongs, and how this knowledge drives their interactions in the group. The model was integrated in the mind of the autonomous characters that perform a collaborative task, in a computer game, with a human player. The game was used in a study that showed that players’ interaction experience was better when interaction with groups that followed our model, namely, regarding trust and social identification with the group. In addition, we found some evidence that players prefer playing in groups that have higher level of conflict.

  • 37.
    Real-Delgado, Yeray
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring the potential of mobile technology for creating music collaboratively2014In: Proceedings of V Workshop on Ubiquitous Music, Publishing and art , 2014, p. 15-16Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Robins, Ben
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Ferrari, Ester
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Eliciting Requirements for a Robotic Toy for Children with Autism: Results from User Panels2007In: The 16th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human interactive Communication, 2007. RO-MAN 2007., IEEE conference proceedings, 2007, p. 101-106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this paper was carried out within the IROMEC project that develops a robotic toy for children. Play has an important role in child development with many potential contributions to therapy, education and enjoyment. The project investigates how robotic toys can become social mediators, encouraging children with disabilities to discover a range of play styles, from solitary to social and cooperative play (with peers, carers/teachers, parents etc). This paper presents design issues for such robotic toys related specifically to children with autism as the end user target group. In order to understand the play needs of this user group, and to investigate how robotic toys could be used as a play tool to assist in the children's development, a panel of experts (therapists, teachers, parents) was formed and interviewed. Results of the expert panel interview s highlight key points characterizing the play of children with autism, and key points for consideration in the design of future robotic toys.

  • 39.
    Rühmann, Lisa M
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Oakley, Ian
    Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea.
    A Tangible Tool for Visual Impaired Users to Learn Geometry2016In: Proceedings of the TEI’16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, ACM Press, 2016, p. 577-583Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how an Android application used in combination with a tangible appcessory can facilitate learning for visually impaired students of geometry. This paper presents the status of this ongoing project. It describes the application, the physical appcessory as well as early stage user studies. The application enables visually impaired users to explore simple geometric forms displayed on a tablet through sound and vibrotactile feedback. A deformable physical appcessory that can be manipulated to adopt these forms and its shape sensed by the tablet adds an additional tactile layer to the application and experience. Three user engagements with visually impaired serve as early validations of our project and ideas and provide feedback that directs design and development of future work. Current avenues for the future work will include additional interaction modes in the application, e.g. the ability to digitize real world forms, and improving the robustness of the tangible appcessory.

  • 40.
    Saunders, Joe
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Nehaniv, Chrystopher L
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Issues in Human/Robot Task Structuring and Teaching2007In: The 16th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human interactive Communication, 2007. RO-MAN 2007., IEEE conference proceedings, 2007, p. 708-713Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching a robot new skills may require that the teacher scaffolds the teaching experience appropriately. However, due to inherent assumptions made by a human teacher the scaffolding process may in some circumstances fail to effectively teach the robot. Here we illustrate this issue in two simple robot teaching exploratory studies and examine the assumptions made by the teacher when teachingthe robot. In the first study the human teacher had to reason about robot perceived states in order to provide suitable teaching. In the second study the human teachers had to understand the perceptual constraints of the robot based on the instructions given beforehand by the experimenter and subsequently adapt the guidance given. The results suggest that although the two tasks are quite distinct in their level of complexity a common thread can be observed: people tend to underspecify theirteaching. It seems that steps of the explanation are assumed to be known and skipped or not even considered at all. We reflect on the possibility that one of the major challenges in designing robots that are capable interaction partners in these teaching situations is to be able to make them communicate their internal state and current capabilities effectively. Furthermore, we also reflect on designing appropriate behavioral primitives for the robot, corresponding implications on the level of taskdescription and for benefiting from human teaching.

  • 41.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Johansson, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Outdoor activities for the learning of mathematics: Designing with mobile technologies for transitions across learning contexts2012In: Proceedings 2012 Seventh IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education (WMUTE 2012), Takamatsu, Kagawa, Japan: IEEE, 2012, p. 33-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Guided by design-based research and the notion of seamless learning, we have designed a learning activity in mathematics where mobile and web technologies support transitions between outdoor and indoor learning contexts. The students' initiatives during the self-regulated outdoor part of the activity are scaffolded by the use of mobile technologies and activity prompts which provide means and demands for on-the-spot oral and visual recordings of the groups' experiences and strategies. We argue that the high quality of mathematical content in the recordings is due to several contributing factors: the choice of appropriate technological support, the informal settings, the availability of relevant physical references, and the immediate recording based on fresh experiences. Our data suggests that the rich nature of the recordings contributes to the effective transition and communication of the outdoor experiences to the classroom's learning context where these experiences are shared and discussed with peers. Finally, we discuss design issues related to the role of the teacher, as well as the structure of the entire activity and the implications for future design iterations.

  • 42.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Designing better mobile collaborative laboratories for ecology field work for upper secondary schools2012In: Proceedings 2012 17th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, WMUTE 2012, IEEE, 2012, p. 77-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the next step in the iterative design process of a four-year project that explores how to use technology in the everyday ecology classroom for fieldwork. In order to proceed in making mobile science inquiries more accessible to the everyday teacher and to better understand how to design the final phases of the project we investigate how small groups of students' use new media tools to conceptualize science. The findings point to design implications that include the need to provide skills concerning the utilization of new media for small group teamwork along with more comprehensive inquiry tools for the learners to support mobile fieldwork

  • 43.
    Syrdal, Dag
    et al.
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Koay, Kheng Lee
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Walter, Michael L.
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Exploring human mental models of robots through explicitation interviews2010In: Proceedings of the 19th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication / [ed] IEEE, IEEE conference proceedings, 2010, p. 638-645Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study exploring how mental models of a mechanoid robot using dog-inspired affective cues behaviour emerges and impacts the evaluation of the robot after the viewing of a video of an assistive robotics scenario interaction with the robot. It discusses this using contrasting case studies based on the analysis of explicitation interviews with three participants. The analysis suggests that while for some users zoomorphic cues may aid in initial interactions, they need to be framed in an authentic interaction, highlighting the actual capabilities of the robot as a technological artifact, and how these impact the everyday life and interests of the potential user.

  • 44.
    Syrdal, Dag
    et al.
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Walter, M. L.
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Koay, Kheng Lee
    Adaptive Systems Research Group, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    s University of Minho, Portugal .
    The Theatre methodology for facilitating discussion in human-robot interaction on information disclosure in a home environment2011In: Proceedings of the 20th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication / [ed] IEEE, IEEE Press, 2011, p. 479-484Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our research is concerned with developing scenarios for robot home companions as part of the EU project LIREC. In this work, we employed a particular methodology to gain user feedback in early stages of robot prototyping: the Theatre HRI (THRI) methodology which we have recently introduced in a pilot study. Extending this work, this study used a theatre presentation to convey the user experience of domestic service robots to a group of participants and to gain their feedback in order to further refine our scenarios. The play was designed both from the perspective of projected technological development of the LIREC project, as well as for facilitating engagement with an audience of secondary school students. At the end of the play the audience was involved in a discussion regarding issues such as acceptability of the scenario and the intra-household disclosure of information by the robot. Findings suggest that this methodology was effective in eliciting discussion with the audience and that problems related to intra-household disclosure of information were best resolved by clear-cut solutions tied to ownership and clear principles.

  • 45.
    Syrdal, Dag Sverre
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Video Prototyping in Human-Robot Interaction: Results from a Qualitative Study2008In: Proceedings of the 15th European conference on Cognitive ergonomics: the ergonomics of cool interaction, ACM Press, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation - Explore and refine qualitative methods of video prototyping in Human-Robot Interaction in order to evaluate user experience of prototype systems.

    Research approach - An exploratory, scenario based study, in which participants were interviewed following some specific guidelines regarding the interviewing technique.

    Findings/Design - The results offer insights into how the context of a presented interaction through video impacts on participants' opinions and attitudes towards a particular interaction, and foster a reflection concerning the wider implications of a system.

    Take away message - The use of evocation in openended interviews regarding user experience of video prototypes is a valuable tool for research.

    Keywords - Human-Robot Interaction, videoprototyping, explication interviews, qualitative methods.

  • 46.
    Syrdal, Dag Sverre
    et al.
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Walters, Michael L
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Otero, Nuno
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Koay, Kheng Lee
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dautenhahn, Kerstin
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    "He Knows When You Are Sleeping": Privacy and the Personal Robot Companion2007In: Proceedings from Workshop Human Implications of Human-Robot Interaction, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI 07), AAAI Press, 2007, p. 28-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most compelling visions of future robots is that of the robot butler. An entity dedicated to fulfilling your every need. This obviously has its benefits, but there could be a flipside to this vision. To fulfill the needs of its users, it must first be aware of them, and so it could potentially amass a huge amount of personal data regarding its user, data which may or may not be safe from accidental or intentional disclosure to a third party. How may prospective owners of a personal robot feel about the data that might be collected about them? In order to investigate this issue experimentally, we conducted an exploratory study where 12 participants were exposed to an HRI scenario in which disclosure of personal information became an issue. Despite the small sample size interesting results emerged from this study, indicating how future owners of personal robots feel regarding what the robot will know about them, and what safeguards they believe should be in place to protect owners from unwanted disclosure of private information.

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