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  • 1. Price, Eoin
    et al.
    Sharrett, Elizabeth
    Smith, Helen F.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Whitehead, Clare
    VIII - Renaissance Drama: Excluding Shakespeare2016In: Year's Work in English Studies, ISSN 0084-4144, E-ISSN 1471-6801, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 1-41Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of articles and books published on Christopher Marlowe during 2014.

  • 2. Price, Eoin
    et al.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Sharrett, Elizabeth
    Smith, Helen F.
    Whitehead, Clare
    Renaissance Drama: Excluding Shakespeare2017In: Year's Work in English Studies, ISSN 0084-4144, E-ISSN 1471-6801, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 466-503Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    A Kingdom for a Man: Representing Masculinity in Late Elizabethan Verse Satire2018In: The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America: New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018, All Academic , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper suggests that the representations of manhood in Elizabethan satire mobilized cultural and sexual values at odds with prevailing masculine ideals of self-control. Thus, the paper investigates to what extent the conventions and conditions of early modern satire imply redefinitions of or challenges to early modern masculinity. While other types of poetry often explore emotional weakness such as tears or effeminacy, even representing ‘alternative’ masculinities, satire is extensively preoccupied with other forms of flawed manhood, such as the angry, dissolute or reckless man. Elizabethan satire explores countercodes of manly conduct, although such countercodes are manifestly different from the ‘soft’ or ‘effeminate’ man of much lyric poetry. Instead, the disorderly and unruly manhood in Elizabethan satire should be understood as an interrogation of classical genre conventions that also responds to early modern patriarchal notions of moderation.

  • 4.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    A New Source for Nashe's Lenten Stuff2013In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 444-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This note argues that one passage in Thomas Nashe's Lenten Stuff (1599) refers to a hitherto unacknowledged source, Richard Johnson's Seven Champions of Christendom from 1596.

  • 5.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    A supposed quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe's Christs teares over Jerusalem2018In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 49-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    “A whole booke of his Retractations”: Thomas Nashe’s Christs Teares over Jerusalem and the Augustinian Narrative of Conversion2017In: The Mimesis of Change: Conversion and Peripety in Life Stories, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests that Thomas Nashe’s religious pamphlet Christs Teares over Jerusalem (1593) draws on an Augustinian narrative of religious conversion. Long regarded as an anomaly in Nashe’s otherwise secular output, Christs Teares was offered to the pious Lady Elizabeth Carey, and Nashe arguably adopted elements of Augustine – including direct references and similarities of tone and narration – in his work in order to find patronage from the Carey household. In terms of life-writing, Nashe’s self-presentation in the pamphlet is intensely bound up with the events of his own life, and the book as a whole is offered as an extended piece of repentance in the wake of Nashe’s much-publicized conflict with Gabriel Harvey in the 1590s. Thus, Christs Teares is also configured by Nashe as “the Teares of my penne” – a narrative of conversion that draws deliberate parallels between Augustine, the “young man puft vppe with the Ambition of that tyme”, and Nashe’s own biography.

  • 7. Sivefors, Per
    ’All our thoughts are nothing but texts to condemn us’: The Internalisation of Carnival in Thomas Nashe’s The Terrors of the Night.2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Sivefors, Per
    'All this tractate is but a dream’: The Ethics of Dream Narration in Thomas Nashe’s The Terrors of the Night2005In: Textual Ethos Studies, or Locating Ethics / [ed] Anna Fåhraeus, AnnKatrin Jonsson, Amsterdam: Rodopi , 2005, p. 161-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Anachronism as Aesthetic Device in Elizabethan Satire2017In: Kingston Shakespeare Seminar : Shakespearean Anachronism Conference: Saturday, February 18, 2017 Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Largely ignored by theorists of satire, anachronism as a narrative and thematic device becomes particularly relevant to understand English satire produced during the 1590s and early 1600s. While generally building on principles of Verfremdung, satire would develop in the Elizabethan period to embrace anachronism as a way of delimiting its own contemporary world. In the writings of John Marston, Joseph Hall, Donne and others, the obscurity of allusions is highlighted by the insistent use of Latinate names as well as Roman terms, practices and objects. From a reader’s point of view such anachronisms of satirical writing become a means of signalling both inclusion (in the select group who might understand the references) and exclusion (since anyone claiming to understand the references would also be implied to be, in Marston’s words, a ”lewd Censurer”). Thus, rather than mere ’imitation’ or a straightforward means to the end of displaying classical learning, anachronism is a crucial modus operandi of Elizabethan satire, one that simultaneously transcended and perpetuated the distance from the literary past.  

  • 10. Sivefors, Per
    ’As many several languages as I have conquered kingdoms’: Tamburlaine II and the Babel Topos2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Sivefors, Per
    Ascham and Udall: The Unknown Language Reformer in Toxophilus2006In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 34-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Authorship as Perambulation in Thomas Nashe’s The Unfortunate Traveller2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Commitment and the Vernacular: Thomas Nashe and Elizabethan literary culture2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been something of a critical commonplace to see Thomas Nashe (1567-1601) as a representative of  “pure”, uncommitted literature. “If asked what Nashe ‘says’, we should have to reply, Nothing”: C.S. Lewis’ statement also can be said to foreshadow post-structuralist readings (e.g. Jonathan Crewe’s) according to which Nashe’s prose basically reveals the logocentric prejudice of the reader. Arguably, though, it is precisely in its obsession with aspects of language that Nashe’s pamphlets reflect commitment: to literary culture, to questions of style, reading and taste. In the lively debate on the role of English vernacular literature in the 1590s, Nashe’s texts stand out not only because they have lots of things to say about the English language and the literary climate (in for example the prefaces to Greene’s Menaphon or Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella) but because they can be said to reflect commitment in their very form: indeed, their exploitation of a satirical persona forces the reader to respond over questions of what literature is, why we read it and who has control over it. In other words, in engaging with Nashe’s underanalysed effort as a critic and writer on aesthetic matters, this paper argues that Nashe’s preoccupation with language is not a matter of lacking commitment so much as a prerequisite for it. As interventions in the literary culture of his time, then, Nashe’s works can be said to refocus the notion of what vernacular literature can or should do.

  • 14.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Committing Authorship: Thomas Nashe and the Engaged Reader2016In: Etudes episteme, ISSN 1634-0450, E-ISSN 1634-0450, no 29, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Criticism on Thomas Nashe has been notoriously preoccupied with the idea that he had nothing to say. While recent analyses have shown that his works in fact do say lots of specific things about the literary culture of his time, Nashe’s peculiar form and style remain at the centre of attention. This essay suggests that Nashe’s preoccupation with style is also what invokes a sense of commitment in his readers; by their use of the author’s persona and their often baffling narration, Nashe’s works also force the reader to consider questions of what literature is, why we read it and who has control over it. In other words, the repeated admissions of incompetence and narrative digressions have the result of engaging the readers in exercising their judgement and deliberating on aspects of style, narrative and, generally, what literature is.

  • 15.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Conflating Babel and Babylon in Tamburlaine 22012In: Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, ISSN 0039-3657, E-ISSN 1522-9270, Vol. 2, no 52, p. 293-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay argues that the second of Marlowe's Tamburlaine plays conflates two biblical narratives—those of the Tower of Babel and the fall of Babylon. While this conflation was widespread in early modern culture, Marlowe's play—unlike many other representations of these narratives—does not suggest reconciliation or salvation as an alternative to the tower or the fall of man. Instead, through its complex response to theological, political, and linguistic issues, Tamburlaine 2 depicts a world in which Babel and Babylon cannot be redeemed.

  • 16.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Den (av)klädda kroppen: Satir, maskulinitet och visualisering2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    “Didone regina di Cartagine” di Christopher Marlowe : Metamorfosi virgiliane nel Cinquecento. Antonio Ziosi, ed. and trans: Lingue e Letterature Carocci 202 ; Centro Studi : La permanenza del Classico 29. Rome : Carocci editore, 2015. 358 pp. €29.2017In: Renaissance quarterly, ISSN 0034-4338, E-ISSN 1935-0236, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 412-414Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    "Dominiering Eloquence": The University Wits and the Elizabethan Legitimation of English.2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19. Sivefors, Per
    Dreaming the Early Modern Cityscape: The Case of the English Hypnerotomachia2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Dreams, Autobiography and the Upward Journey in Girolamo Cardano's De vita propria liber2018In: Hagiographic Adaptations / [ed] Frida Forsgren, Tor Vegge, Pisa: Fabrizio Serra Editore, 2018, p. 83-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay argues that the dream narratives in Girolamo Cardano’s autobiography De vita proper liber (written 1575) share important characteristics with the didactic and exemplary uses of dreams in late classical and medieval hagiography. While not a piece of hagiography in itself, Cardano’s book features dreams with a particularly rich indebtedness to Christian and hagiographic devices such as the “upward ascent” narrative also found in saints’ dreams. Moreover, Cardano’s dreams, the Christian element of which has been underplayed by scholars, also posit the dreamer as a mediator between God and audience in ways that my article relates to the exemplary force in divine dreams. Thus, in the extension the article also deals with how to mediate dreams (editing them, writing them down, conferring authority on them) and investigates the senses in which dreams achieved status as “true” or “prophetic”.

  • 21.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Dreams, Subjectivity and the Author: The Cases of Shakespeare and Strindberg2015In: Shakespeare and Scandinavia: International Academic Conference, 8-11 October 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a parallel reading of the use of dreams in the drama of Shakespeare and Strindberg. Of course, dreams are a common device in theatre from all times, although their significance and dramatic function vary over time. Specifically, dreams in early modern drama such as A Midsummer Night’s Dream could sometimes serve as a figure for the audience,  as in Puck’s address to the spectators: “You have but slumbered here / While these visions did appear”. In other cases such as John Lyly’s The Woman in the Moon the play is deferentially suggested to be the author’s dream, with deference to his patron: “Remember all is but a Poets dreame, / The first he had in Phœbus holy bowre”. By contrast to such concessions to the audience and their patronage, Strindberg’s symbolist drama of the early 20th century – itself strongly inspired by Shakespeare – utilizes the dream device in a way that reflects the structure of the human psyche. His A Dream Play (1907) deliberately sets out to “reproduce the disconnected but apparently logical form of a dream”, in which characters “are split, double and multiply”. Moreover, the fin-de-siècle sensibility of Strindberg’s play suggests a different conception of the author: dreams no longer represent the will of the audience so much as the condition of the writer. In other words, the Shakespearean dreams of Strindberg's plays reflect both changing conceptions of interiority as well as historically conditioned changes in the status of the author.

  • 22. Sivefors, Per
    England’s Intellect and Moneybag: The Metropolis and Early Modern Domestic Tragedy2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23. Sivefors, Per
    Fearful Echoes and Heavenly Words: Language, Subjectivity and the Inward Voice in Doctor Faustus2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Linnaeus University.
    “Heere may I sit, yet walke to Westminster”: Urban Peregrination in Elizabethan Verse Satire2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to verse satire since its Roman inception, walking, particularly in city space, is an integral element also to Elizabethan satirical poetry. Rather than assume a strict pattern of imitation from Roman to Elizabethan, however, this paper argues that the device of the city walk in satirists such as Donne, Guilpin and Marston responds to pattern of urbanisation in the late 16th century as well as new forms of representing city space in visual and conceptual terms. To these poets, the city becomes a space that is both traversable and mappable, and rather than simply describe urban territory, satirical writing also – in Michel de Certau’s words – ‘manipulates spatial organization’.

  • 25.
    Sivefors, Per
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    ‘I dreamt tonight that I did feast with Caesar’: Literary dreams, interpretation and freedom in early modern England.2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26. Sivefors, Per
    ’Infinite Riches in a Little School’: Gosson, Masculinity, and Marlowe2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Introduction: Urban Encounters2013In: Urban Encounters: Experience and Representation in the Early Modern City / [ed] Per Sivefors, Pisa: Fabrizio Serra Editore, 2013, p. 13-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An introduction to the anthology Urban Encounters: Experience and Representation in the Early Modern City

  • 28.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Lisping Amorists and snaphaunce satirists: Satire, Immoderation and the Bishops' Ban of 15992016In: Presented at New Perspectives on Censorship in Early Modern England: Politics, Literature and Religion: 1-3 December 2016, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    'Maymd Soldiours or poore Schollers': Warfare and Authorship in the Works of Thomas Nashe2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As is well known, war is a strong presence in Thomas Nashe’s The Unfortunate Traveller, with its court page protagonist and gory depiction of the massacre of the Anabaptists in 1536. However, warfare and soldiery are recurring metaphors in Nashe’s other writings and the purpose of this paper is to explore the connections between the conditions of warfare and the conditions of authorship. “Many Souldiours are most impatient vaine-glorious . . . Many puny Poets & old ill Poets are mighty vaine-glorious” (Christ’s Tears over Jerusalem): in Nashe’s restlessly associative prose, the martial desire for honour and reputation becomes a figure for the desire for poetic fame, and Nashe’s defence of the theatre in Pierce Penniless is rooted in the idea that idle “Captaines and Souldiers” need dramatic entertainment: “There is a certaine waste of the people for whome there is no vse, but warre: and these men must haue some employment still to cut them off”. Thus, war as a figure in Nashe’s writings is frequently associated with literary pursuit: the violent struggle for survival and honour is analoguous, and both soldier and poet exist on the same precarious borderline between glory and “waste”. The latter is a common figure for literature in Nashe’s writings, and characteristically, it is the outsider position of both soldier and poet that is explored; both are vagrant (as “those who come from the warres” who “cosen, begge, and starve”, both strive for glory and both are relegated to the social margin. As symbolic presences in Nashe’s writing, then, warfare and soldiers seem to serve the function of commenting on the conditions of the writer.

  • 30.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    ‘Maymd Soldiours or poore Schollers’: Warfare and Self-Referentiality in the Works of Thomas Nashe2018In: Cahiers Élisabéthains, ISSN 0184-7678, E-ISSN 2054-4715, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 62-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article suggests that war and peace are explored in the works of Thomas Nashe as figures for the condition of the writer. Throughout his career, including his troubles with the authorities and his conflict with Gabriel Harvey, Nashe makes use of the war metaphor in order to elaborate on the condition of authorship. However, war is also a literal presence in Nashe’s texts, which frequently reference events like the Spanish Armada or the campaign in Ireland. Thus, the article examines the complex interplay between social reality and self-referential metaphor that characterizes Nashe’s use and descriptions of warfare.

  • 31.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    "Or we shall have a monster of a man": Satire, satyrs and early modern masculinities in John Marston’s The Scourge of Villanie2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    "Painting forth the things that hidden are": Thomas Nashe's "The Choise of Valentines" and the Printing of Privacy2011In: LIR.journal, E-ISSN 2001-2489, no 1, p. 23-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay argues that the Elizabethan author Thomas Nashe’s (1567–1601) erotic poem »The Choise of Valentines« explores early modern senses of distinction between manuscript writing and print. In his dedication and in subsequent responses to critique against the poem, Nashe invokes a sense of intimacy with his patron and his audience – an intimacy that is associated in his texts with manuscript writing but is enacted by references to, and directly in, the medium of print. In other words, »The Choise of Valentines« constructs a fiction of privacythat is rhetorically and commercially exploited in the medium of print – which is, in turn, constructed as the public opposite of the intimate, private medium of manuscript writing.

  • 33.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Prayer and Authorship in Thomas Nashe’s Christs Teares over Jerusalem2016In: English, ISSN 0013-8215, E-ISSN 1756-1124, Vol. 65, no 250, p. 267-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses Thomas Nashe’s longest and perhaps most frequently misread work, the religious pamphlet Christs Teares over Jerusalem. While criticism used to dismiss this text as either an aesthetic failure or consider it a hoax, the present analysis situates Christs Teares in the context of Nashe’s self-projection as an author. In doing so, it links the religious fervour and frequent instances of prayer in the text as a way for Nashe to position himself in relation to his patron and his audience. Drawing on the intermingling secular and religious meanings of prayer in Nashe’s time, the article suggests that prayer is predominantly configured as petition in Christs Teares and as such it provides Nashe with a position of dejection and humility that at the same time is a source of empowerment. In other words, the article proposes that the religious tone of the work should not be seen as an anomaly but rather a strategy that is integral to Nashe’s authorial persona as represented in Christs Teares and elsewhere.

  • 34.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Prayer and the Performance of Authorship in Thomas Nashe's Christs Teares over Jerusalem2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that the the frequent occurrences of prayers in Christs TearesOver Jerusalem (1593) constitute an expression of Nashe's own liminal positionas a writer, specifically in the context of the hostile audience reactions that thework provoked. Prayers for comfort from the Lord function as acts ofempowerment for the author and furnish a position of "mourning" fromwhich Nashe constructs his authorial persona. While the paper thus revisitssome of the more recent scholarship on Nashe and authorship, it provides anew angle in exploring the specific role of post-reformation religious beliefand ritual in the development of authorial role models. Moreover, itcontributes to the ways in which Christs Teares can be understood as a central,rather than marginal text in Nashe's oeuvre as a whole.

  • 35.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Prophecies, dreams and epistemological change in early modern drama2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes that prophetic dreams in early modern plays are also a source of unease, in the sense that the “prophetic” value of them is frequently made problematic. Drawing on plays by Lyly, Webster and Shakespeare, the paper connects such tendenices to changing notions of the human psyche and to a gradual loss in the epistemological prestige of prophetic dreams. From the idea that dreams foresee the future, early modern drama comes to reflect the idea that dreams tell us something about the dreamer him- or herself.

  • 36.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Prophecies, Dreams, and the Plays of John Lyly2013In: Staging the Superstitions of Early Modern Europe / [ed] Verena Theile, Andrew D. McCarthy, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 191-215Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Prostituting my pen like a Curtizan: Thomas Nashe and the Embodiment of Manuscript Culture2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Sivefors, Per
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Publishing Thomas More’s Utopia in Latin and English: A Humanist Success Story and How to Translate It2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Reforming and Censoring Elizabethan Verse Satire, 1590 – 16002018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the notable exception of John Donne, Elizabethan satirists rarely appear to engage with matters of faith. This is notably so despite that several writers of satire at the time would later pursue clerical careers (apart from Donne, also Joseph Hall and John Marston). While this absence may have been a question of decorum, of what was considered suitable matter for a secular (and controversial) genre, this paper argues that Elizabethan satire in the wake of the Marprelate controversy took on specific connotations of immoderation that ran counter to the via media as represented by the Church of England. This ‘guilt by association’ should furthermore be understood in connection with John Whitgift’s status as responsible for the so-called Bishops’ Ban and as a staunch enforcer of a moderate Anglican via media vis-a-vis Puritanism. In other words, the relative absence of religious issues in Elizabethan satires themselves does not preclude a reception that infused them with notions of theological and political controversy.

  • 40.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Riots, Surveillance and the Crowd in The Book of Sir Thomas More2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Rökt sill, hamnstäder och brittiska identiteter : Thomas Nashes Lenten Stuff (1599)2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    "Saint George for England, and the Red Herring for Yarmouth": British Identities and Policies in Thomas Nashe's Lenten Stuff2013In: Urban Encounters: Experience and Representation in the Early Modern City / [ed] Per Sivefors, Pisa: Fabrizio Serra Editore, 2013, p. 221-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43. Sivefors, Per
    ’Saint George for England, and the Red Herring for Yarmouth’: British Identities and Politics in Thomas Nashe’s Lenten Stuffe2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Satir, ekfras och enargeia: Visualisering hos John Marston och Thomas Lodge2017In: Medier, historie og mening: Studier i kulturelle formidlingsformer / [ed] Jahn Holljen Thon, Andreas G. Lombnæs, Oslo: Portal forlag, 2017, p. 55-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Satire, Satyrs, and Early Modern Masculinities in John Marston’s The Scourge of Villanie2015In: Allusions and Reflections: Greek and Roman Mythology in Renaissance Europe / [ed] Elisabeth Wåghäll Nivre mfl, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, p. 171-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is frequently pointed out that ”satire” in the English Renaissance was thought to relate to “satyr”, and “satyr play”. Until Isaac Casaubon pointed out in 1605 that the term was derived from “satira” and hence referred to a more subtle and civilized mode of expression, early modern English satire was characterized by strong social commentary and direct verbal attacks, especially so in the social and cultural upheaval of the 1590s. However, the confusion of satire and satyr also offered a rich field of exploration of ideas of gender, and I argue in the present paper that verse satire such as John Marston’s in The Scourge of Villanie (1598) utilizes the contaminated genre definition to explore notions of masculinity. Moreover, Marston’s satire on the effeminate manners of courtiers thematizes masculinity – or the lack thereof – as a challenge of political orthodoxy. By representing the targets of his attacks as oversexualized (not only through the “satyr” subtext but in frequent mention of the phallic god Priapus), Marston draws on the conventional idea that sexual over-indulgence leads to effeminacy. At the same time, his satirical representation of the vices of his time through a negotiation of classical patterns in effect challenges conventional taste to such an extent that masculinity per se becomes open to debate. In other words, classical culture did not offer a sure-fire corrective to depravity but a means of questioning current gender norms, in political as well as literary terms.

  • 46.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Satisfaction and expectation in the early modern theatre audience2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Satyrs, Prototypes and Emulation: Creating Past and Present in English Satire of the 1590s2016In: Presented at Renaissance Prototypes : Conference at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper examines the complex interplay between classical prototype and early modern practice in that most metamorphic  type of writing: satire. Variously labeled a “mode” and a “genre” by modern critics, satire as produced in late Elizabethan and Jacobean England is indebted to well known classical role models such as Juvenal, Horace and Persius; yet it also stretches across other forms of writing such as drama, and distinctions such as that between “formal” and “Menippean” satire are only partly valid when mapping the complexities of satire evinced in for example well known poets such as Donne and Jonson, but also in the vogue for satirical literature in the 1590s as represented by for example John Marston, Joseph Hall and Thomas Nashe. While these authors have often been dismissed using adjectives like “marginal”, they were widely read in their own time, and Hall even claimed (mistakenly) to be the first satirist in the English language. Thus, the myth of a satirical “beginning” in the English Renaissance opens up a broad discussion on canonicity, origin and projected future – all too neglected in the discussion of a mode of writing that has received renewed attention in the wake of recent political and medial development. Satire, in short, offers provocative ways of considering both the past of the Renaissance and the Renaissance as past.

  • 48.
    Sivefors, Per
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    'Scant Allowable to English Ears': The Reformation of Diction and Tradition in William Webbe's A Discourse of English Poetrie2009In: The Formation of the Genera in Early Modern Culture / [ed] Clare Lapraik Guest, Pisa: Fabrizio Serra , 2009, p. 69-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay situates William Webbe's treatise A Discourse of English Poetrie (1586) within the context of early modern debates on vernacular literature. Its claim is basically that Webbe's work is caught up between the classicist stance of mid-century humanism as represented by for example Roger Ascham and the later, more antiquarian and consistently nationalist positions of the early seventeenth century (exemplified in my discussion by Samuel Daniel's A Defence of Ryme, 1603). In other words, the essay traces some ideologically significant aspects of the discussion on vernacular literature in early modern England by focussing on an author who occupies a liminal position in this development.

  • 49.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Sex and the Self: Simon Forman, Subjectivity and Erotic Dreams in Early Modern England2013In: Pangs of Love and Longing: Configurations of Desire in Premodern Literature / [ed] Anders Cullhed, Carin Franzén, Anders Hallengren, Mats Malm, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 281-292Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay proposes a new reading of the physician and astrologist Simon Forman’s dream of Queen Elizabeth, recorded in 1597. While previous criticism has examined this dream for its political implications and its connections to other literary texts, Sivefors contextualizes it from the point of view of early modern dream theory and subjectivity. The basic argument is that Forman’s dream both invests dreams with predictive value and anticipates a more distinctly modern, individualizing, anti-metaphysical tendency in dream interpretation. This is crucially reinforced by an emphasis on sexuality – male, hetero, “normal” – as a defining characteristic of the individual. Forman’s dream is in line with a general tendency for dreams to lose in epistemological prestige in the 17th century – a tendency that increasingly puts the emphasis on the individual’s inner life rather than on implications of angelic messages or general predictions of the future. What is more, the individual’s sexuality and sexual orientation are at the focus of this change, thus in important ways foreshadowing later developments in, e.g., Freudian psychoanalysis. The essay hence maps a complex series of changes in attitudes to dream interpretation as well as to sexuality in the Early Modern period.

  • 50.
    Sivefors, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Sex and the Self: Simon Forman, subjectivity and erotic dreams in early modern England2011Conference paper (Other academic)
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