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  • 1.
    Bengtsson-Verde, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, The University Administration.
    Carlsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Gustafsson, Birgitta E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Koblanck, Henriette
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Mattsson, Tina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Social Work.
    Montesino, Norma
    Nilsson, Karl-Axel
    Rosenqvist, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    En metod för kvalitetssäkring och utvecklinggenom granskning av examensarbeten: avrapportering av pilotprojekt vid Linnéuniversitetet2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Challenges faced by teachers implementing socio-scientific issues as core elements in their classroom practices2015In: European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 2301-251X, E-ISSN 2301-251X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 159-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers may face considerable challenges when implementing socio‐scientific issues (SSI) in their classroom practices, such as incorporating student‐centred teaching practices and exploring knowledge and values in the context of socio-scientific issues. This year‐long study explores teachers’ reflections on the process of developing their classroom practices when implementing SSI. Video‐recorded discussions between two upper secondary school science teachers and an educational researcher, grounded in the teachers’ reflections on their classroom practices, provided data for the analysis. The results show that during the course of the implementation the teachers enhanced their awareness of the importance of promoting students’ participation and supporting their independence as learners. However, the results also suggest a conflict between the enactment of a student‐centred classroom practice and the achievement of intended learning goals. In order to accept the challenge of implementing SSI in the classroom, it is suggested that it is essential for teachers to build strategies, which integrate dialogue about learning goals.

  • 3.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Teachers’ challenges when faced with developing their practice through the integration of SSI2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University;University of Cambridge, UK.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gender performativity in physics: affordances or only constraints?2014In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 523-529Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this forum we engage in a dialogue with Allison Gonsalves’s paper ‘“Physics and the girly girl—there is a contradiction somewhere”: Doctoral students’ positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics’. In her paper Gonsalves uses a sociocultural approach to examine women doctoral students’ stories about becoming physicists. In doing so her paper focuses on how discourses of masculinity and femininity can create available and unavailable positions for the women students. In this dialogue we do a parallel reading of two of the student narratives presented by Gonsalves, using Judith Butler’s (1990) concept of discursive agency as a means to more explicitly bring the affordances for women identity constitution offered by their localized physicist context to the fore, rather focusing on its, often more visible, constraints.

  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Birgitta E.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Granskning av examensarbeten och analys av utbildningsprocesser inom utvalda inriktningar i lärarutbildningen2011In: En metod för kvalitetssäkring och utveckling genom granskning av examensarbeten: avrapportering av pilotprojekt vid Linnéuniversitetet, Linnéuniversitetet , 2011, p. 23-33Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Att göra etiska överväganden kring stoff och arbetssätt kring medicinska frågor: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Medicin, hälsa och ohälsa, Del 3: Etik i klassrummet, gymnasieskolan ]2019Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    How do 15-16 year old students use scientific knowledge to justify their reasoning about human sexuality and relationships?2016In: Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, ISSN 0742-051X, E-ISSN 1879-2480, Vol. 60, no November, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to advance our understanding about the roles studentsassign to expert knowledge, the present study addresses how secondaryschool students use their knowledge of scientific disciplines in theirreasoning of socioscientific issues (SSI). Through group discussions, theresults show that students use science either as a sole justification orintegrated with other kinds of knowledge. Using expert knowledge to liftproblems out of the limited local contexts and find solutions, thestudents access the freedom to make personal choices. Thus, it wasconcluded that scientific knowledge provides possibilities for decisionsthat can support students' agency.

  • 8.
    Lundin, Mattias
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Action for purpose in a language game in motion2007In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 300-303Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Att dokumentera en undersökning i en uppsats2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Att förhålla sig till heteronormen i förskola och skola: Några homo- och bisexuella lärares sätt att hantera den heteronormativitet de upplever på arbetsplatsen2013In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2001-6131, no 11, p. 30-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta projekt syftar till att öka medvetenheten om homo- och bisexuella lärares vardag i svensk skola och förskola genom att belysa några av dessa lärares erfarenheter. Datainsamlingen grundar sig på skriftliga berättelser och analysen är genomförd med ett deltagarorienterat förhållningssätt där informanterna haft inflytande på urval och analys. Ett queerteoretiskt ramverk applicerades på det empiriska materialet och resultaten består av fyra strategier som beskriver hur dessa lärare hanterar de normrelaterade situationer som uppstår. Tolkningen visar att lärarna känner sig tvingade att säga ifrån och att anpassa sig men att man också helt enkelt undviker samtalsämnen och känsliga situationer. Det empiriska materialet ger också exempel på hur man kan arbeta för att skapa en förebild. Resultaten indikerar att arbete med att främja normmedvetenhet och ett öppet förhållningssätt är betydelsefullt för att underlätta allas varande i skolan.

  • 11.
    Lundin, Mattias
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Building a Common Platform on Students’ Participation2007In: Journal of Science Education and Technology, ISSN 1059-0145, E-ISSN 1573-1839, Vol. 5, no 16, p. 369-377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Buildning a framework to study the hetero norm in praxis2011In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 50, no 5-6, p. 301-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve equality in schools and to facilitate the identification of oppressive features of the classroom, a framework to indicate the heterosexual norm and its consequences is needed. The purpose of this paper is to construct this framework through a review of literature focusing on the school setting and texts related to equality in Swedish schools. Seven themes indicating the norm were found and denoted: repetition of desirability, dichotomization of sexes, differentiation of sexualities, hierarchy of positions, marginalization, issue making and personation. It is concluded that the framework could benefit from being applied on empirical material and that further attention should be paid to the various subject positions that the framework should address.

  • 13.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    En termin vid Ohio State University: Erfarenheter och reflektioner2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Extended abstract 

    In fall 2013 I had the opportunity to stay at Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus, thanks to STINT’s Excellence in Teaching program. In this report I present some of the things I learned there about higher education. OSU is a huge university that was founded in 1870. Here, students pay a tuition fee of $10,000 per year—more if they are not Ohio residents. OSU offers everything a student could wish for, including not only an extraordinary number of courses but also a wide array of interesting clubs, and centers. My experiences at OSU to some extent focused on the Department of Teaching and Learning but were not limited to that context. Below, I present reflections related to three aspects of campus life: the students, the teachers, and the education.

    Students

    The student group at OSU consists of 90% Ohio residents, but this makeup does not contradict the image of an international campus in Columbus, where many students speak a mother tongue other than English and have educational backgrounds in countries outside the United States. There are many clubs in which students can engage with one another outside their classes, and these clubs focus on specific topics and activities. The university sponsors the clubs, and I conclude that they contribute to OSU’s rich student environment. The relationship between students and teachers is usually relaxed, and I noted that teachers often explicitly expressed their expectations to students.

    Teachers

    A professor position at OSU (in the Department of Teaching and Learning) consists of three responsibilities: teaching, research, and service. Faculty members are expected to dedicate 40%, 40%, and 20% of their time, respectively, to these activities. Service includes administration, meetings, and various kinds of work, such as peer-review tasks and course planning. The actual distribution of time among the three responsibilities is likely closer to 40%, 30%, 30%. 

    A prerequisite for becoming an associate professor and obtaining tenure is a doctoral degree. The track to tenure starts with a nonpermanent six-year appointment. After that, the evaluation for tenure takes place; it considers the candidate’s achievements in research, pedagogic competence, and service. A teacher who is not accepted for tenure may remain at OSU for one additional year after the evaluation, but not more. 

    Education

    Students at OSU take several courses at the same time, up to five discrete courses and these run parallel throughout the semester. This system of parallel courses allows time for reflection on the course literature and course activities. Teachers can address small parts of a text in each class session, and the relatively long time frame makes it possible to connect new discussions to ideas that were discussed earlier in the course. While many students have options regarding the choice of courses, the courses for student teachers are set depending on their initial choice(s) of specialty (e.g. subject(s) and age of students). Different paths within the teacher training consequently do not exist. 

    A distinguishing feature of most courses that I experienced is the detailed style of planning and instruction. For example, the teacher provides homework for students that may consist of texts to read or a task to reflect on; students present their reflections in the following class session. I interpret this approach as involving a certain amount of study strategy, for the master’s level students as well as the undergraduates. This strategy likely bears positive implications in terms of student learning, especially for students who are less accustomed to taking responsibility for their studies. In line with such support, I noticed that many classes among those I visited in the teacher training involved some kind of practical assignment. Such an assignment or task could, for example, ask students to complete the same activity their future students would be asked to do in an actual classroom setting. In addition to an activity, students were asked to reflect upon its accomplishment. I also encountered examples in which school-like approaches were enacted in the university setting. For instance, student teachers were frequently asked about government mandated standards of learning, the rationale being that they needed to be familiar with those standards because they themselves would be evaluated as teachers in relation to how well they could achieve the goals expressed in the policy documents. As the semester progressed, the reflections on students’ assignments came to involve more and more use of theory. 

    OSU provides extensive support to both teachers and students. Early in the semester, for example, teachers were offered a workshop that addressed various pedagogic topics and issues. During the semester the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching (UCAT)[1] offered consultations. These sessions comprised counseling in combination with course visits. Support is also provided as Course Design Institutes (CDIs), likewise arranged as workshops. A CDI is organized in order to promote course development. The Dennis Learning Center (DLC)[2] aims to support students by offering, for instance, courses to enhance students’ motivation or students’ study stills, but students may also receive private tutoring in their studies. Another function that facilitates students’ learning and experience is the Undergraduate Research Office, which coordinates activities for students who are interested in participating in, experiencing, and learning from research with researchers and research groups that can accommodate an undergraduate. Undergraduate research may culminate in a thesis or a poster, but its most important aspect is the experience and the exposure to research achieved through the collaboration. 

    Reflections

    The support that UCAT and DLC offer is impressive. Taking into account the number of students who go directly from upper secondary school to university in Sweden, I wonder how many of them would benefit from such support. Adding to this notion the facts that Swedish university courses (as I have seen them) frequently involve less direction regarding how to study and that Swedish courses often involve less homework, I suggest that equivalents of UCAT and DLC would be successful tools for promoting high-quality outcomes also in Sweden. A further method of fostering desirable outcomes can be seen in OSU’s approach to undergraduate research.

    Another observation in relation to the Swedish system is the system of parallel courses found at OSU. The time students are allowed to reflect on what has been read and discussed is likely to facilitate deep learning. The environment at OSU is dynamic, characterized by students of many nationalities; I have seldom seen anything like that in Sweden. The international environment likely provides tools for development and is indeed a valuable source of competence. How could we create such an environment in a Swedish university context, and what obstacles to doing so need to be addressed?

    To conclude

    This report does not include any accounts of people or experiences in the city of Columbus itself, nor do I provide any suggestions to future STINT scholars. I believe that every trip abroad is unique but I would still be happy to give personalized advice to those of you who have questions.

    The opportunity to live abroad for a time has opened my eyes to many things, small and large, regarding phenomena both at home and in the United States. The contrast in what is different makes things otherwise taken for granted a bit more visible. Therefore, I would like to express deep gratitude to the STINT foundation for allowing me to participate in the Excellence in Teaching program. I also extend great thanks to all the friendly, helpful, and benevolent people—friends—that I met at The Ohio State University and in Columbus.

    [1] http://ucat.osu.edu/

    [2] http://dennislearningcenter.osu.edu/

  • 14.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Equality work as means for health education: Queer theory in science education equality work2010In: Éducation à la santé dans et hors l'École: Actes du 3e colloque national 2010 / [ed] Berger, D. & Simar, C., Saint-Étienne: Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - IUFM de l'Académie de Lyon , 2010, p. 355-366Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is intended to contribute to health by addressing the equality work and the acknowledgement of all students and by those means promote health. The idea is to equity by sketching a framework, facilitating the identification of the heterosexual norm and applying it on an empirical material. Science education has been pointed out as fact-based and built on reliable knowledge. However, sexual education offers aspects as love, sexuality and relations -aspects suggesting a tension between the biological and well established definition of sex and later non-dichotomized perspectives. Teachers need to take these different perspectives into account to promote equality – and health - for people that are not part of the prevalent norms for doing gender and sexuality. To study prevalent norms, a queer perspective has been used to build a framework and apply it on a data material that constituted of video observations in two classes with 14-year-old students during sexual education lessons. The results show that the framework is fruitful to illuminate equality issues regarding the hetero norm, by visualizing its re-construction and that further work needs to be done to improve the framework with respect to its internal structure. Nevertheless, it is concluded that the framework indicates attempts to challenge the norm.

  • 15.
    Lundin, Mattias
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Former experiences and students' learning in teacher centred lessons2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Frågandet i klassrummet2014In: Lärande i handling: En pragmatisk didaktik / [ed] Jakobson, Lundegård, Wickman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, p. 175-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att ställa frågor kan ses som ett klassiskt inslag i klassrumssamtalet som fortfarande är lika aktuellt. Om vi besöker en grupp elever och deras lärare för att studera deras frågande får vi höra lärares frågor till elever men också att elever frågar sin lärare. Det här kapitlet handlar om hur frågandet i klassrum fungerar. Som lärare behöver vi vara uppmärksamma på de olika funktioner som frågor kan ha – inte minst för att de utgör ett väsentligt redskap för yrkesutövandet. De frågor som jag i detta sammanhang syftar på är ämnesrelaterade frågor, exemplifierade med samtal om naturvetenskap. Min förhoppning är emellertid att resonemangen om frågor och deras svar ska vara giltiga i fler sammanhang än naturvetenskap. I skolan förekommer förstås frågor om allt från tid för lektionsslut och provdatum, till vilken klasskamrat man ska samarbeta med. Detta kapitel avgränsas dock till de ämnesrelaterade frågorna, eftersom de kan tänkas bidra till elevers ökade förståelse av ämnet.

  • 17.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Heteronormativitet – vad är det?2012In: Normkritiska perspektiv – i skolans likabehandlingsarbete / [ed] Elmeroth, Elisabeth, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, p. 59-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Homo- and bisexual teachers’ ways of relating to the heteronorm2016In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 75, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although legislation has made achievements to strengthen  the rights of  homosexual people in many European countries, the school setting seems to be a place where it can be  hard to be  open as a homosexual person. This  article presents articulations of what it is to be  homo- or  bisexual as  a teacher, based on  a discourse analysis. The  empirical material suggests  two  different  discursive  approaches  described  as   vigilance  and  resource, suggesting  different realities of  these teachers. It  is  interpreted that it is  not enough only to rely on  laws and a positive mind-set of the general public. An explicit support from colleagues is suggested to be  crucial to facilitate this group’s prerequisites to participate equally compared to norm conforming colleagues.

  • 19.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Introducing the nature of school science (NOSS)2010In: Contemporary Science Education Research: SCIENTIFIC LITERACY AND SOCIAL ASPECTS OF SCIENCE: A collection of papers presented at ESERA 2009 Conference / [ed] G. ÇAKMAKCI & M. F. TAŞAR, Turkey: ESERA , 2010, p. 281-286Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how students and teachers address features of science in school science practice in lower secondary school. The pointof departure is that if a school subject content is treated as relevant, it is likely to promote the involvement of the students. The conceptnature of science (NOS) could be part of science education and perhaps enhance the relevance of a school science activity. The excerptsfound in this text are based on video observations in two schools. The classes were not chosen for any particular reason, except that theteachers and their students agreed to be visited during their lessons. The analysis is based on the idea that school science involves differentways of meaning making and these are referred to as different language games. The analysis points out that school science involves featuresthat are not related to science itself, for example, students’ learning as well as their safety. The science classroom is consequently not anexample of a pure science language game but should be interpreted as a school science language game where students’ learning is a majorpurpose. Features of a school science language game that do not relate to the NOS, but, to students’ learning, I designate nature of schoolscience (NOSS) (Cf. Lundin, 2008). NOSS is not applicable in professional science practices. In a school science language game, theteacher needs to consider the students’ learning, their safety (cf. Lundin & Lindahl, 2005), and to ensure that the lesson is carried out inits allotted time etc. Such considerations are core elements in the NOSS. It is suggested that students’ discrimination of features referringto the NOSS and the NOS could facilitate classroom communication.

  • 20.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Inviting queer ideas into the science classroom: Studying sexual education from a queer perspective2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Inviting queer ideas into the science classroom: studying sexuality education from a queer perspective2014In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science education has been pointed out as fact-based and built on reliable knowledge. Nevertheless, there are areas that include other aspects. Sexual education is, according to the Swedish syllabus, such an example and it involves aspects as love, sexuality and relations. These aspects suggest a possible tension between the biological and well-established definition of sex and later non-dichotomized perspectives. Teachers need to take both of these aspects into account as they work. Equality work aiming at providing equality for people that are not part of the prevalent norms for doing gender and sexuality is another endeavour to teachers in science education. To be able to study prevalent norms a queer perspective has been used. The hetero norm is defined in this perspective and it is explained as the expectation that everybody is heterosexual and wishes to live in hetero pair-ship. This perspective also involves the normative construction of man and woman. The different ways to approach sex and sexuality is the research object of this study and the research question is formulated as follows: How can the construction of the hetero norm be visualized by queer theory to challenge the norm in sexuality education? A framework that visualizes the hetero norm and that could elicit attempts to question the norm was chosen for the analysis. The applied framework can be summarized using the following descriptions: repetition of desirability, dichotomization of sexes, differentiation of sexualities and hierarchy of positions. The data constituted of observations made in two classes with 14-year-old students during sexuality education lessons. The results illustrate how the hetero norm was reconstructed in all of the four parts of the applied framework. The analysis provides four examples of how the norm was challenged, first, by expressing the unexpected and uncommon, second, by an orientation towards uncommon positions, third, by eliciting the communalities of sexes and fourth, by an illumination of the queer. It is concluded in the paper that a challenge of the hierarchy of positions is subsequent to the challenge of the initial parts of the framework. Furthermore, the part of the framework called repetition of desirability could benefit from being part of a different level compared to the following parts of the framework. The excerpts used in the analysis were chosen because of their applicability to the framework. However, the biological content does not stand out in the chosen excerpts. The analysis cannot point out if this is a coincidence and it is open to further research to illuminate whether the biological content is diminished, or if teachers might focus on the biological subject content separately from the questions referring to love, sexuality and relations. To conclude, the framework seems to be fruitful to illuminate equality issues regarding the hetero norm both by visualizing the reconstruction of the norm as well as visualizing attempts to challenge the same norm.

  • 22.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Laborationer och deras relevans2012In: Skola och naturvetenskap: - politik, praktik, problematik i belysning av ämnesdidaktisk forskning / [ed] H. Strömdahl & L. Tibell, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, p. 49-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Som NO-lärare vill vi gärna att elever ska få en god bild av naturvetenskapernas karaktär, 'Nature of Science' (NOS) och arbetet med laborativa moment utgör en del i den strävan. NO-undervisning har vetenskapliga inslag såväl som inslag av exempelvis didaktisk karaktär. Ee sistnämnda betecknas här som 'Nature of School Science' (NOSS). Procedurer i exempelvis skollaborationer är sällan berättigade genom något behov av exakta resultat, utan är en del av en lärandeprocess. Begreppet NOSS avser att accentuera aspekter i verksamheten som med andra ord har med lärandet av naturvetenskap att göra.

  • 23.
    Lundin, Mattias
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Learning human biology in a pupil centred setting2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lundin, Mattias
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Meaning making of precision and procedures in school science2008In: Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, ISSN 1492-6156, E-ISSN 1942-4051, Vol. 1, no 8, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lundin, Mattias
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Questions as a tool for bridging science and everyday language games2007In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 265-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Lundin, Mattias
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Situated sensemaking of the human body2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Students' participation in the realization of school science activities2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Gunnarsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Att dirigera undervisningen i naturvetenskapliga ämnen2010Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholm University.
    Situated meaning-making of the human body: a study of elementary school children’s reasons in two different activities2014In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 173-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purpose of understanding how different situations afford children to make meaning, we compare children’s self-expression in drawings to their statements during interviews. In particular, we study how two different activities interact and enable children differently to make meaning about the human body. We observe the children’s meaning-making as they worked in pairs to explain the body drawings that they did prior to the interviews. Meaning-making was studied by using a PEA, an analysis facilitating understanding of how relations are established in a developing conversation, and more generally providing understanding from a child perspective. The results indicate that children use several types of reasons in the two different situations; namely, social, artistic, practical, empirical and memory reasons are identified. Social reasons refer to statements belonging to the social context and items that were described as inappropriate to express. Artistic reasons were interpreted from aesthetic judgements, referring to the artistic quality of the drawing. Practical reasons were given in situations where children expressed, for example, that the space limited their opportunities to draw. Empirical reasons are built on children’s statements referring to picture details that are identified by pointing or touching their own body. Memory reasons are involved in all the situations in which children explained that they had left something out in the picture. We suggest that children interpret situational aspects and make judgements concerning the relevance of their different reasons. This research will hopefully facilitate children’s understanding of interview questions and also to improve researchers’ understanding of children’s ability to grasp relevant details prior to their response (or participation).

  • 30.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Experiences and their role in Science Education2005In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Negotiating the relevance of laboratory work: Safety, procedures and accuracy  brought to the fore in science education2014In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This text addresses the problem of the discrepancy between teachers’ and students’ positions in negotiations about the authenticity and legitimacy of school science activities. The study focuses on the apparent conflicts concerning legitimacy and authenticity when teachers and students bring attention to safety, authenticity and accuracy during issues laboratory activities. The analysed data are excerpts made from video observations in two science classes. Analysis was made using epistemological moves describing how teachers and students make their activities relevant. The result indicates that in the classroom conversation about laboratory practice, teachers sometimes draw the attention to safety, procedures and accuracy to legitimize the activity and how they try to control it. Negotiations concerning the legitimacy and authenticity of activities seem inevitable. Unless understandable agreements are reached, the negotiations jeopardize a successful understanding of the Nature of Science (NOS). Misunderstanding of the authenticity of activities contributes to a reduction of their legitimacy, and undermining teaching of context independent knowledge.

  • 32.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nanni, Eftychia
    University of Ioannina, Greece.
    Plakitsi, Katerina
    University of Ioannina, Greece.
    Exploring critical perspectives on sexuality in science education research2013In: Science Education, research and praxis, ISSN 1792-3166, no 42-43, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the discipline of science education reduces more and more its strong framing and meets its cultural dimension. Often, science education involves various issues that only indirectly relate to students’ understandings of natural phenomena. Moreover, science communities today are largely characterized by heterogeneous groups with differences in race, sex, religion, language and ethnicity. These different aspects of cultural diversity play an important role in the particular ways students respond to science education. This research field is becoming increasingly pivotal by the researchers working in the multidisciplinary fields of cultural studies and science education. Research on gender and ethnicity in relation to students' learning can be mentioned as two recently developed fields. However, there seem to be areas that are addressed to a very limited extent still. Sexuality constitutes such an example, with the research aim focusing on sexuality in relation to students' learning. In this position paper, a research gap in science education is indicated and addressed. We suggest that further attention should be paid to how the hetero norm asserts power on teachers and students in school science. In addition, more research that challenge unequal practices and discourses of dominance in school science could be one way to further develop school science. The general goal for such research would be to promote inclusion in the school science practice as well as in relation to the subject content. Inclusion of all different sexualities is crucial, in order to make school science a subject that relates to everybody.

  • 33.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. University of Ioannina.
    Plakitsi, Katerina
    University of Ioannina.
    Nanni, Eftychia
    University of Ioanina.
    Exploring critical perspectives on sexuality in science education research2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the discipline of science education reduces more and more its strong framing and meets its cultural dimension. Often, science education involves various issues that only indirectly relate to students’ understandings of natural phenomena. Moreover, science communities today are largely characterized by heterogeneous groups  with differences in race, sex, religion, language and ethnicity. These different aspects of cultural diversity play an important role in the particular ways students respond to science education. This research field is becoming increasingly pivotal by the researchers working in the multidisciplinary fields of cultural studies and science education. Research on gender and ethnicity in relation to students' learning can be mentioned as two recently developed fields. However, there seem to be areas that are addressed to a very limited extent still. Sexuality constitutes such an example, with the research aim focusing on sexuality in relation to students' learning. In this position paper, a research gap in science education is indicated and addressed. We suggest that further attention should be paid to how the hetero norm asserts power on teachers and students in school science. In addition, more research that challenge unequal practices and discourses of dominance in school science could be one way to further develop school science. The general goal for such research would be to promote inclusion in the school science practice as well as in relation to the subject content. Inclusion of all different sexualities is crucial, in order to make school science a subject that relates to everybody.

  • 34.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Torpsten, Ann-Christin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    The ’flawless’ school and the problematic actors: research on policy documents to counteract discrimination and degrading treatment in schools in Sweden2018In: European Journal of Education, ISSN 0141-8211, E-ISSN 1465-3435, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 574-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the anti‐discrimination initiatives and the efforts against degrading treatment are promoted by two laws indicating self‐regulatory and transparent actions toward preventing both. To be successful, it is important that everybody involved in the work has the same understanding of the task and that everybody understands written formulations of local policy documents, here labelled eq‐uity plans, in order not to reinforce inequalities when counteracting discrimination and degrading treatment. Our aim is to explore the world‐views that are expressed by the schools in their equity plans. We ask what are the perceived causes of discrimination and degrading treat‐ment within the schools, what solutions in the equity plans emerge and which subject positions are constructed and made possible. The analysis rendered three discourses of which we can see recurring signs in the material and these have been labelled The perfect school discourse, The desig‐nated discourse and The educational discourse. These dis‐courses are different in how they relate to discrimination and degrading treatment in school and they also provide different opportunities for students. We conclude that policy‐making is important as a means to change discrimi‐natory patterns and we suggest how to avoid drawing on discourses that are likely to counteract the goals.

  • 35.
    Magnus, Cristian D.
    et al.
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Challenging Norms: University Students' Views on Heteronormativity as a Matter of Diversity and Inclusion in Initial Teacher Education2016In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 79, p. 76-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diversity, as seen in this article from a sexual orientation perspective, is currently an emerging topic on many levels in Europe. This article sets out to examine how future teachers and educators articulate that very aspect of diversity; normative ideas about sexuality that tend to oppress and that are related to educational settings. The understanding of how future educators engage in this topic is a key factor for future work promoting the inclusion of lesbian, gay, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) people in schools and enriching school life for all. This supports establishing a positive climate, which ultimately helps students to thrive in a democratic environment (Lerner & Boyd, 2013). This is a challenge on all levels of the educational system: policy- and governance-wise as well as on the level of institutions and individuals.

  • 36.
    Magnus, Cristian David
    et al.
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    University students' views on heteronormativity: a concept to facilitate students' reflections on heteronormativity and what we have learnt from it2017In: Presented at the AERA 2017 Annual Meeting, San Antonio, USA, April 28-30, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on the results of a qualitative study on heteronormativity and introduces a reflective seminar concept invented and designed for this purpose. The model aims at facilitating students' ability to reflect on heteronormativity. Challenging their thinking about heteronormative practices, we asked students to use it and thereby reflect in three consecutive steps upon the impact of heterosexuality in educational situations. The results showed a contradiction between the students’ positive attitudes towards equality and a lack of ideas of how to promote it. This indicates a lack of opportunities for students in to reflect. Addressing aspects of diversity such as sexual identities and orientations, we suggest that our reflective model is a very useful tool to promote reflective processes.

  • 37.
    Torpsten, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Policy documents to counteract discrimination and degrading treatment in schools2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden the anti-discrimination initiatives and the efforts against degrading treatment are promoted by two laws (SFS, 2008:567; SFS 2010:800). Our aim is to explore and understand the self-regulatory efforts to prevent discrimination and degrading treatment in school. We examine Swedish school equity plans asking what the causes of discrimination and degrading treatment within the schools are and what solutions emerge and which subject positions are constructed and made possible? Documents from all compulsory schools in six municipalities are collected.

    In a discourse analysis we focus on how the phenomenon is expressed. We constructed a definition of a problem and or each problem we search for possible subject positions. At a first stage, various recurring ideas were found in the texts. These were gathered with respect to their expressions of degrading treatment and discrimination in their own educational setting. To uncover the ways of understanding the reasons for the occurring school problems, we searched for solutions that are related to the school problems presented. As a second step, we addressed the identified discourses to find out what subject positions are made possible.

    The analysis has rendered three discourses. The perfect school discourse – rejects the occurrence of degrading treatment and discrimination. Everybody feels safe and there are no needs for solutions. In this perfect school the only subject position is the perfect student. In The designated discourse, non-complying students cause problems and the solution is to educate these students. In this discourse there are two subject positions, the non-complier and the functioning student. In The educational discourse, problems are dominant norms that provide inequalities and the solutions are questioning and criticizing norms, taking care of each other’s and self-reflection. In this discourse there is one subject position, the active fellow. 

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