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  • 1.
    Berggren, Åsa
    et al.
    SAAB.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Olausson, Deborah
    Lund University.
    Rudebeck, Elisabeth
    SAAB.
    Early Neolithic flint mining at Södra Sallerup, Scania, Sweden2016In: Archaeologia Polona, ISSN 0066-5924, Vol. 54, p. 167-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The area around the villages of Kvarnby and S.dra Sallerup in south-west Scania is the only known flint-mining site in Sweden. Radiocarbon dates show that the flint was mined mainly during the earliest phase of the Early Neolithic, between c. 4000 and 3600 BC, thus coinciding with the earliest evidence of the Funnel Beaker Culture in the region. The type of flint, the size of the flint nodules, production debris in the mining area and the concentration of point-butted axes to south-west Scania all suggest that the mining was related to the extraction of flint for the production of point-butted axes. However, considering the abundance of easily available flint elsewhere in the region, it seems clear that the mining was not motivated purely by economic reasons. We suggest that the very extraction of flint from pits and shafts in the chalk was socially and symbolically significant in itself.

  • 2. Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Editorial2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 8-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Geoffrey, Cunnar
    et al.
    Western Cultural Resource Management, USA.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    The Child is Now 25: A Short Introduction to a Special Issue2015In: Childhood in the Past: An International Journal, ISSN 1758-5716, E-ISSN 2040-8528, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 75-77Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Magnusson Staaf, Björn
    Andrén, Anders
    Bolin, Hans
    Burström, Mats
    Cassel, Kerstin
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Jennbert, Kristina
    Karlsson, Håkan
    Kristian, Kristiansen
    Kyhlberg, Ola
    Larsson, Lars
    Förslaget till ändringar i kulturminneslagen håller inte!2011In: DIK Forum, no 5, p. 19-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Gärdenfors, Peter
    et al.
    Lund University; Wallenberg Research Centre at Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Wallenberg Research Centre at Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Evolutionary mechanisms of teaching2015In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, ISSN 0140-525X, E-ISSN 1469-1825, Vol. 38, p. 25-26, article id e41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that Kline’s analysis does not account for the evolutionary mechanisms that can explain the uniqueness of human teaching. We suggest that data should be complemented by an analysis of archaeological material with respect to what forms of teaching are required for the transmission of technologies over generations.

  • 6.
    Gärdenfors, Peter
    et al.
    Lund University ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa ; Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, South Africa.
    The Archaeology of Teaching and the Evolution of Homo docens2017In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 188-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching is present in all human societies, while within other species it is very limited. Something happened during the evolution of Homo sapiens that also made us Homo docens—the teaching animal. Based on discussions of animal and hominin learning, we analyze the evolution of intentional teaching by a series of levels that require increasing capacities of mind reading and communication on the part of the teacher and the learner. The levels of teaching are (1) intentional evaluative feedback, (2) drawing attention, (3) demonstrating, (4) communicating concepts, and (5) explaining relations between concepts. We suggest that level after level has been added during the evolution of teaching. We demonstrate how different technologies depend on increasing sophistication in the levels of cognition and communication required for teaching them. As regards the archaeological evidence for the different levels, we argue that stable transmission of the Oldowan technology requires at least teaching by demonstration and that learning the late Acheulean hand-axe technology requires at least communicating concepts. We conclude that H. docens preceded H. sapiens.

  • 7.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The Past is Now: An interview with Anders Högberg2008In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 7-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Anders Högberg is a Swedish archaeologist whose research offers an original perspective on prehistoric flint technology but he has also been directing some innovative projects in archaeological teaching and learning. In this interview I am exploring some of the ideas that have been guiding his work in both realms. Although part of the interview is about work conducted in the past, equal weight is given to new opportunities and developments that affect the future of archaeology. Anders Högberg's ideas cannot be said to be typical or representative for any larger community, but he is operating in very specific historic circumstances that are shared to a greater or lesser extent by many other archaeologists living and working today. This interview documents the particular views on material culture, public archaeology, and the field of archaeology more generally that were held by one European archaeologist in 2008.

  • 8.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and the Future2018In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Cham: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future has seldom been an object of archaeological study even though there are some very profound and deep-reaching links between past, present, and future. At the same time, archaeologists work to preserve places, environments, and associated values and knowledge for future generations. But although it is not far-fetched to claim that the future will differ from what we are used to in the present, in managing archaeological heritage, most assumptions about the future do not build on an understanding of how the future will be different from today. We argue in this paper that archaeologists should not only promote historical consciousness but also future consciousness.

  • 9.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and the future: Managing nuclear waste as a living heritage2015In: Radioactive Waste Management and Constructing Memory for Future Generations: Proceedings of the International Conference and Debate, 15-17 September 2014, Verdun, France, OECD Publishing, 2015, p. 97-101Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is the study of the past and its remains in the present. It is relevant to the long-term preservation of records, knowledge and memory, e.g. regarding final repositories of nuclear waste, in two ways. Firstly, future archaeology may promise the recovery of lost information, knowledge and meaning of remains of the past. Secondly, present-day archaeology can offer lessons about how future societies will make sense of remains of the past.

    Archaeology is always situated in a larger social and cultural context and the information, knowledge and meaning it generates is necessarily of its own present. Archaeological knowledge reflects contemporary perceptions of past and future; these perceptions change over time. Indeed, we cannot assume that in the future there will be any archaeology at all. We think, therefore, that future societies will want, and need, to make their own decisions about sites associated with nuclear waste, based on their own perceptions of past and future. To facilitate this process in the long term we need to engage each present, keeping safe options open.

    In this text we elaborate on these issues from our perspective as archaeologists.

  • 10.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Communicating with future generations: what are the benefits of preserving for future generations? Nuclear power and beyond2014In: The European Journal of Post-Classical Archaeologies, ISSN 2039-7895, Vol. 4, p. 315-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1977, the first fast breeder nuclear reactor in the world to provide electricity to a national grid was shut down for the last time. The Dounreay Dome on the North coast of Scotland, near Thurso, Caithness, was completed in 1958 and its silhouette later became an emblem of the Atomic Age. As the decommission of the entire site proceeds, incorporating even other defunct nuclear reactors and associated facilities, the question arose whether the Dome can and should be preserved as cultural heritage for the benefit of future generations. Using the example of the legacy of the nuclear power station at Dounreay, this paper discusses the question what it means to preserve something for the benefit of future generations.

  • 11.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Contemporary Heritage and the Future2015In: The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Heritage Research / [ed] Emma Waterton, Steve Watson, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 509-523Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of the future are pertinent in order to make the best decisions in present society. They are, however, full of difficulties, as the future is an empirical field which does not exist (Slaughter, 1996; Bell, 1997; Mogensen, 2006). Both pertinence and difficulties apply also to studying the future in relation to human culture. The main challenge lies in the circumstance that cultural heritage of the future cannot in itself be empirically investigated and described, since it is in part dependent on decisions that have not yet been made. Studying heritage futures is thus about considering what we know about cultural heritage in the context of prognoses and visions of what will come. Yet how do we do that? The American anthropologist Samuel Gerald Collins contributed to an interesting discussion on how anthropology and anthropologists have previously embraced the future and how they might now be embracing it. He emphasized that an important approach is to vouchsafe the possibility that future ways in which people will think and act may be very different from today, and, in doing so, to open up a space (or a spacetime) for critical reflection on the present (Collins, 2008, p. 8). This approach is a useful programmatic declaration for engaging with the future in disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, history and heritage studies.

  • 12.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kulturarvssektorn är dåligt förberedd för framtiden2018In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 4, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Nuclear waste as future culture heritage2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Contemporary Archaeology of Nuclear Waste: Communicating with the Future2016In: Arkæologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, no 35, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future will differ from what we are used to in the present. Yet in archaeology, the heritage sector and the nuclear waste sector, most assumptions do not build on an understanding of how the future will be different from today. Instead, planning is made as if key aspects of heritage and nuclear waste will not change significantly in the future at all. The present authors are both archaeologists with an interest in applying our academic expertise to challenges in contemporary and future society (Holtorf and Högberg, 2015a). Between 2012 and 2014 we worked on an interdisciplinary research project entitled One hundred thousand years back and forth. Archaeology meets radioactive waste. Based on results from this project, we suggest here that archaeologists and other professionals working in the heritage sector, as well as their institutions, should start thinking in more depth about the future. We suggest that heritage specialists should not only promote historical consciousness but also future consciousness. Both these forms of consciousness are essential for the ability to appreciate the interconnections between past, present and future. 

  • 15.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Zukunftsbilder in erhaltungsstrategien2014In: Diachrone zugänglichkeit als prozess: kulturelle überlieferung in systematischer sicht / [ed] M. Hollmann and A. Schüller-Zwierlein, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, 1, p. 197-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    In diesem Beitrag argumentieren wir, dass Langzeitzugänglichkeit von Informationen maßgeblich von den Zukunftsbildern geprägt wird, die in konkreten Erhaltungsstrategien ihren Ausdruck finden.  Wie wir uns heute die Zukunft vorstellen, beeinflusst auf welche Weise wir etwas bewahren. Die künftige Vergangenheit hängt somit von der gegenwärtigen Zukunft ab. Die Beispiele, die diese These in unserem Artikel entwickeln und illustrieren sollen, haben alle einen Bezug zu dem österreichischen Ort Hallstatt im Salzkammergut. Dadurch wird deutlich, wie an einem einzigen Platz unterschiedliche Zukunftsbilder zusammenspielen und in konkreten Erhaltungsstrategien zu unterschiedlicher Langzeitzugänglichkeit führen.

    Wir diskutieren in diesem Beitrag drei unterschiedliche Zukunftsbilder. Sie gehen aus von einer sich fortsetzenden Kontinuität, einem kontrollierbaren Wandel beziehungsweise einem früher oder später kommenden Kontinuitätsbruch. Obwohl man vielleicht erwarten könnte, dass Erhaltungsstrategien und auf ihnen beruhende Langzeitzugänglichkeit von Information desto verlässlicher sein werden, je weniger man davon ausgeht, dass die Dinge bleiben wie sie sind, und je mehr man mit Veränderung rechnet, wird unsere Diskussion zeigen, dass dies nicht unbedingt so ist. 

  • 16.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lindskog, Daniel
    Arch Out Loud: Designing a Surface Marker for a Geological Repository of Nuclear Waste for the Benefit of Our Children2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17. Hughes, Richard
    et al.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Olausson, Deborah
    Lunds Universitet.
    The Chemical Composition of Some Archaeologically Significant Flint from Denmark and Sweden2012In: Archaeometry, ISSN 0003-813X, E-ISSN 1475-4754, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 779-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flint was one of the most widely employed raw materials for artefact manufacture in Denmarkand Sweden during the Stone Age, and it continued to be used during subsequent periods.Prehistoric flint mining and lithic manufacturing studies in these countries have attractedconsiderable attention, but there have been no recent attempts to chemically characterize thegeological source materials. This paper builds on a pilot study (Hughes et al. 2010) and usesenergy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis to determine quantitative compositionestimates for nine major, minor and certain trace elements in seven archaeologicallysignificant flint sources in Denmark and Sweden, along with new data on a number of othersources of prehistoric significance. These data provide a geochemical foundation for ongoingresearch devoted to determining contrasts and continuities in the time and space utilization offlint sources in Scandinavian prehistory.

  • 18.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    A Lithic Attribute Analysis on Blades form the Middle Stone Age Site, Hollow Rock Shelter, Western Cape Province, South Africa2016In: Lithic Technology, ISSN 0197-7261, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 93-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a lithic attribute analysis of blades from the late Middle Stone Age site, Hollow Rock Shelter (HRS), in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Blades from the Still Bay (SB) Industry have not been described previously, but this artifact category makes up a considerable part of the site’ s lithic assemblage. Blades were systematically detached from prepared cores with a well-shaped exterior core surface. Despite this, variation in attributes best defi nes blades from HRS. The lithic assemblage also holds a large amount of SB points. Points and blades are present in the same excavation units and layers, indicating they are contemporary. Results of this study show the diffi culties of using attribute analysis for interpreting technological aspects of blade production. It is concluded that integrated experiments, together with comparative studies between sites, are needed to further understanding of SB blades.

  • 19.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    A Social Anthropology and Human Origins2012In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 292-293Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Academic publishing in Sweden threatened by withdrawal of support2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 168-170Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Högberg, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Arkeologi - frälsning för  folket?2009In: Arkeologi och samhälle / [ed] Petersson, B., Jennbert, K. & Holtorf, C., Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    At taenke ud over oprindelse: Nye tilgange til at forstå kulturarv og pluralitet2018In: Social kritik tidsskrift for social analyse og debat, ISSN 0904-3535, Vol. 30, no 153, p. 8-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Högberg, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Bilder av skånsk uppdragsarkeologi hos allmänheten och i dagspress2004In: Meta: Medeltidsarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7903, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Book Review - Rodney Harrison : Heritage. Critical Approaches: London : Routledge, 2013. 268 pp. ISBN : 978-0-415-59197-32016In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 90-92Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Brons, guld, silver och koppar: yngre bronsålderns metallhantverk vid Kristineberg2011In: Södra Kristineberg: hantverk i fokus: hantverk i fokus : [arkeologisk slutundersökningar 2001-2006 : Oxie socken i Malmö stad, Skåne län]  / [ed] Anders Högberg, Malmö: Malmö Museer , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bronze Age Connections: Cultural Contact in Prehistoric Europe2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 304-306Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Högberg, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Child and Adult at a Knapping Area. A technological Flake Analysis of the Manufacture of a Neolithic Square Sectioned Axe and a Child’s Flint knapping Activities on an Assemblage excavated as Part of the Öresund Fixed Link Project.1999In: Acta Archaeologica, ISSN 0065-101X, E-ISSN 1600-0390, Vol. 70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Childhood in the Past2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 119-120Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Chronology, stratigraphy and spatial distribution of artefacts at Hollow Rock Shelter, Cape Province, South Africa2014In: South African Archaeological Bulletin, ISSN 0038-1969, E-ISSN 2224-4654, Vol. 69, no 200, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excavated in 1993, Hollow Rock Shelter was the first site, together with Blombos Cave, to present stratified sediments with a lithic assem- blage that could be regarded as belonging to the Still Bay Industry. This made Hollow Rock Shelter a well-known site and a standard reference in discussions of the dating, description and interpretation of the South African Middle Stone Age. Yet, even though results from analysis of the lithic assemblage and excavations conducted at the site have been published, aspects of chronology, stratigraphy and the distribution of artefacts at Hollow Rock Shelter are not clear. The reason is that the site and its lithic assemblages were never fully analysed. With this paper I investigate what is known and what is not known about the site. Based on the results, I discuss suggestions for further future analysis. I conclude that renewed analysis needs to be performed to fully understand the Hollow Rock Shelter site and its relation to other Middle Stone Age sites. 

  • 30.
    Högberg, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Community Archaeology: en samskapandets arkeologi2008In: Arkeologi i förorten: Berättelser från norra Botkyrka / [ed] Burström, M., Stockholm: Huddinge:Arkeologi, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Södertörns h , 2008, p. 119-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Delundersökning C: museerna2014In: En omtolkad kultursatsning: museerna och Skapande skola / [ed] Sara Grut, Östersund: NCK, Nordiskt Centrum för Kulturarvspolitik , 2014, 1, p. 81-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Den illusoriska jakten på vårt lyckliga ursprung: [recension av] Lasse Berg, Skymningssång i Kalahari: hur människan bytte tillvaro. Ordfront, 312 s. Isbn 97891703764742014In: Respons: recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 3, p. 24-26Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Lasse Bergs Kalahariböcker har till stor del blivit populära på grund av hans tes om människans inneboende godhet som han vill påvisa genom att leta upp vårt ursprung i Kalahari. Men människan har inte ett ursprung. Hennes utveckling är komplex och vi föds med förutsättningar att vara både goda och onda, sociala och asociala.

  • 33.
    Högberg, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Dåtid i samtid eller samtid genom dåtid?: Det förflutna och bevarande från ett ungt perspektiv2008In: Samtidsarkeologi – varför gräva i det nära förflutna?: rapport från en session vid konferensen IX Nordic TAG i Århus 2007 / [ed] Burström, Mats, Stockholm: Södertörn , 2008, p. 59-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Ett regionalt centra i ljuset av ett mångfacetterat hantverk: en studie av sociala grupper, institutioner och förändring på yngre bronsålderns Södra Kristineberg2011In: Södra Kristineberg: hantverk i fokus : [arkeologisk slutundersökningar 2001-2006 : Oxie socken i Malmö stad, Skåne län], Malmö: Malmö Museer , 2011, p. 177-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Gamla Uppsala – staging heritage in a culture of consumption2012In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 175-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that cultural heritage conservation is a part of contemporary society and as such mirrors contemporary society’s values. In this study I have examined how this is expressed in the way cultural heritage has been represented at Gamla Uppsala, using our current zeitgeist as a culture of consumption as a starting point. The results show that antiquarian efforts at this site have contributed to creating a heritage site on display that emanates authenticity and clarity, which in this study is tied to the current spirit of consumerism. The results also show that the site museum’s narratives to some extent offer an alternative to a culture of consumption, by providing narratives about the site through time, narratives that are multifaceted and require an effort to absorb.

  • 36.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Hantverk i fokus2011In: Södra Kristineberg : hantverk i fokus: [arkeologisk slutundersökningar 2001-2006 : Oxie socken i Malmö stad, Skåne län]  / [ed] Anders Högberg, Malmö Museer , 2011, p. 7-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Heritage Education, the Time Travel Method and Developments in Theory2018In: The Time Travel Method: in the Service of Society and its Development : Papers from the international seminar in Kalmar 28 February 2018 / [ed] Ebbe Westergren, Gustav Wollentz, Kalmar: Kalmar läns museum , 2018, p. 24-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Högberg, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Historiemedvetande och uppdragsarkeologi:  tankar om alternativa kunskapsmål2004In: META - medeltidsarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7903, Vol. 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hur kunskapen om livets ursprung har utvecklats: Ulf Ellervik : Ursprung : Berättelser om livets början, och dess framtid, Fri tanke, 216 s., ISBN 97891879355342016In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 5, p. 40-41Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    I experimentens lustgård: hur man gör och gjorde en flintyxa2016In: Mellan slott och slagg: Vänbok till Anders Ödman / [ed] Ingrid Gustin, Martin Hansson, Mats Roslund, Jes Wienberg, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2016, 17, p. 89-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recurrent theme in Anders .dman’s career is his curiosity about all kinds of experimental archaeology. Quite a few people have learned the art of working flint at ‘knap-ins’ arranged by Anders. This text takes flint-knapping experiments as a starting point for a discussion of different ways to make a Neolithic axe. In technological analyses prehistoric axes are compared with those resulting from experimental archaeology. The conclusion is that there were different traditional methods of manufacture among Neolithic axe makers, but only one among modern flintsmiths.

  • 41.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Imponerande verk om mänsklighetens historia: Recension av Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens - En kort historik över mänskligheten2015In: Tidskriften Respons, ISSN 2001-2292, no 3, p. 53-55Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kommunikation, uppdragsarkeologi och kravspecifikationer: Om att utvärdera och definiera potentialen för kommunikativa insatser2013Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Högberg, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Kulturarv och skolan – en kommentar2008In: Historieundervisning och identitet i det mångkulturella klassrummet / [ed] Andersson, N., Stockholm: Historielärarnas förening , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Högberg, Anders
    Malmö Kulturmiljö.
    Kulturmiljöpedagogik med nuet i fokus2008In: NCK:s vårkonferens 2008: kulturarvspedagogik i Norden: konferensrapport, Östersund: NCK - Nordiskt centrum för kulturarvspedagogik , 2008, p. 13-21Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Högberg, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Kulturmiljöpedagogik och ledarskap2006In: Utbildningsledarskap: nu och i framtiden / [ed] Riddersporre, B, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2006, p. 67-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Högberg, Anders
    Lund University.
    Lithics in the Scandinavian Late Bronze Age: Sociotechnical change and persistence2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 47. Högberg, Anders
    Litiskt material från Siretorp, Blekinge.: Analys av material från utgrävning.2010Report (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Lövknivar av flinta – en diskussion om datering2010In: In Situ Archaeologica, ISSN 2000-4044, Vol. 2008, p. 11-28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Högberg, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Lövknivar av flinta från yngre bronsålder: ett redskap som trots sitt namn inte användes som lövkniv2009In: Österlent, ISSN 1652-1293, no 1, p. 15-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Mark Edmonds & Rose Ferraby, Stonework2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 221-222Article, book review (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 112
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