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  • 1.
    Charles, Maggie
    et al.
    Oxford University Language Centre, UK.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Introducing English for Academic Purposes2016Book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Charles, Maggie
    et al.
    Oxford University.
    Pecorari, DianeHunston, SusanBirmingham University.
    Academic writing: At the interface of corpus and discourse2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Charles, Maggie
    et al.
    Oxford University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Hunston, Susan
    Birmingham University.
    General Introduction2009In: Academic writing: At the interface of corpus and discourse / [ed] M. Charles, D. Pecorari & S. Hunston, London: Continuum, 2009, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Irvine, Aileen
    et al.
    Moray House School of Education, Edinburgh University.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    To what extent do L2 students in UK Higher Education acquire academic and subject-specific vocabulary incidentally?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Across the UK hundreds of thousands of international students pursue a higher degree through the medium of L2 English, attending the same lectures and reading the same texts as their L1 counterparts.  Although most of these international students will have initially passed through some form of English language proficiency gate-keeping exercise (such as minimum required IELTS scores), little allowance may be made thereafter for possible gaps in necessary vocabulary knowledge. Thus, L2 students may be implicitly assumed either to have sufficient working knowledge of the required vocabulary, or to be able to “pick up” this vocabulary knowledge incidentally during the course of their studies.

    This paper explores whether the Academic Word List (AWL) and subject-specific vocabulary knowledge of L2 undergraduates taking a degree in Biology at a UK university is, in fact, comparable to that of their L1 counterparts.  Results from a vocabulary test administered in the third week of Semester 1 of the first year of studies indicated a relatively substantial gap between the levels of vocabulary knowledge of L1 and L2 students. This gap was particularly apparent in knowledge of lower-frequency AWL vocabulary. A post-test was administered 28 weeks later, towards the end of the students’ first year at university. This paper will report on the results of the post-test and discuss to what extent this previously perceived linguistic “gap” between L1 and L2 students may have increased or decreased. The paper will also outline a follow-up investigation into the ways in which L2 students deal with unknown vocabulary encountered during the course of their undergraduate degree studies.

  • 5.
    Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Engaging with terminology in the multilingual classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 lectures and English reading2017In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some academic settings where English is not the first language it is nonetheless common for reading to be assigned in English, and the expectation is often that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the first language as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of eight undergraduate lectures from two universities in such a setting, this paper provides a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e. how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in these settings, or to exploit the affordances of multilingual environments.

  • 6.
    Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Chalmers Unviersity of Technology.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    The University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Engaging with terminology in the parallel-language classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 and English2016In: ASLA-symposiet 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In settings in which English is used as a medium of instruction (EMI) in parallel with another language, a common expectation is that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the L1 as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of a sample of lectures from two courses in a partial EMI setting, in which the lectures were in Swedish and the textbooks were in English, this paper will present a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e., how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in partial EMI settings, or to exploit the affordances of these learning environments.

  • 7.
    Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Coverage and development of academic vocabulary in assessment texts in English medium instruction2016In: Developing and Assessing Academic and Professional Writing Skills / [ed] Susanne Göpferich, Imke Neumann, Frankfurt: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016, p. 45-69Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Maricic, Ibolya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Mind the gap!: highlighting novelty in conference abstracts2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The conference abstract or proposal is a promotional genre, intended to secure the acceptance of a paper at a conference and often (especially in the 'hard' disciplines) in subsequent proceedings. It is therefore, as Hyland and Tse (2005) note, a high-stakes genre, and therefore one which early-career researchers need to master.

     

    One promotional resource is to show the research to be novel and original; to demonstrate (in Swales' 1990 terms) that a gap exists in the research literature.  Given that a significant proportion of space in abstracts is given over to material which corresponds to the introduction in the paper itself (Cutting, 2012), opportunities for highlighting the gap exist.  However, not all authors take advantage of this opportunity.  reported that Just over 40% of the TESOL abstracts were found not to contain a 'gap statement' (Halleck and Connor, 2006) . 

     

    One factor driving the propensity to include a gap statement (or not) appears to be first language (Yakhontova, 2006). In addition, novice researchers may be less likely to deploy this feature which can help them promote their work.

     

    This paper will report the results of an investigation into conference asbstracts in the sciences and engineering. Two corpora, one consisting of abstracts written by postgraduates during an academic writing course, and one consisting of accepted and published abstracts were analysed for two features: the presence or absence of a 'gap' statement, and the lexical and structural routines used for describing the gap. Comparisons between the corpora will be presented, and implications for the academic writing classroom will be addressed.

     

    References

     

    Cutting, D. J. (2012). Vague language in conference abstracts. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 11, 283–293.

    Halleck, G. B., & Connor, U. M. (2006). Rhetorical moves in TESOL conference proposals. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 5, 70–86.

    Hyland, K., & Tse, P. (2005). Hooking the reader: a corpus study of evaluative that in abstracts. English for Specific Purposes, 24, 123–139.

    Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Yakhontova, T. (2006). Cultural and disciplinary variation in academic discourse: The issue of influencing factors. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 5, 153–167.

  • 9.
    Maricic, Ibolya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Hommerberg, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Golden opportunity, necessary evil or sword of Damocles?: What teachers say about English-medium instruction2016In: ASLA-symposiet 2016: Språk och norm, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of university programmes taught exclusively through the medium of English around the world is rising, and when the partial use of English is taken into account (for example, when the language of instruction is the local language but the textbook is in English), then the role of English in higher education is seen to be pervasive indeed. The increasing use of English has, however, been driven to a great extent by policy, rather than by bottom-up preferences on the part of participants in English-medium settings, making it relevant to ask what their perceptions and understandings of the phenomenon are.

    This paper will present the results of a large-scale survey of Swedish university teachers and their views on and experiences of the use of English in higher education. The findings show that teachers identify both positives and negatives, but also describe a situation in which there are only limited attempts to accentuate the former and mitigate the latter.

  • 10.
    Maricic, Ibolya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Hommerberg, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Supporting language learning in the English-medium university classroom: Teacher attitudes, beliefs and practices2015In: 2015 joint conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) and L'Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée/Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics (ACLA/CAAL), Toronto, Canada, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of a pronounced internationalization trend in Swedish higher education, this paper investigates university teachers’ attitudes towards and practices of using English as medium of instruction. Findings from questionnaire and interview data indicate diverse attitudes and a widespread lack in specific pedagogical practices that promote language learning.

  • 11.
    Maricic, Ibolya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Hommerberg, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Weighing English in the balance: University teachers' perspectives on teaching through a second language2017In: ASLAs skriftserie, ISSN 1100-5629, no 26, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    English is increasingly used nowadays as a medium of instruction in tertiary education worldwide, facilitating the outward mobility of home universities' staff and students, as well as the inward recruitment of international faculty and students. However, teaching and learning in a foreign language can be a challenging enterprise, and the implications of the trend toward English-medium instruction (EMI) are to date not fully understood. Based on a large-scale survey, this study aims at unveiling the perceptions and experiences of Swedish university teachers involved in EMI. The respondents express a wide array of views and experiences, grouped under ten thematic areas. The respondents' views are often polarised in that they identify both costs and benefits of teaching in English, while describing a reality where little support is provided to augment the benefits and mitigate the costs. These results indicate a need for enhanced communication with all stakeholder groups, to raise critical awareness about impending costs, as a step toward minimizing potential damages and maximizing the benefits of English in higher education today.

  • 12.
    Mežek, Špela
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Learning subject-specific L2 terminology: The effect of medium and order of exposure2015In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 38, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the globalised university environment, many university students are expected to learn subject-specific terminology in both the local language and the L2 (English) by learning from two media in two different languages: lectures in the local language and reading in L2 English. These students' bilingual learning is greatly affected by the learning strategies they employ. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of student choice of learning media and the order of media on their learning and perception of learning of terminology in English. The results confirm that added exposure to terminology in different media, even in different languages, contributes to learning and show that, in some circumstances, learning terminology from reading may be more effective than learning it from a lecture. The results also show that students do not correctly judge their knowledge of terms learnt from different media in different languages and that they underestimate knowledge gained from reading in L2. Implications for teaching are discussed.

  • 13. Pecorari, Diane
    Academic writing and plagiarism: A linguistic analysis2008Book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Additional reasons for the correlation of voice, tense and sentence function.2013In: Of butterfiles and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] N.-L. Johanesson, G. Melchers & B. Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 153-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Referring to other scholars’ work is an important component of research writing, and one which requires careful attention in order to convey the writer’s stance toward the reported propositions and their relationship to each other and to the writer’s own work. Second language writers often find it difficult to master the skill of selecting appropriate forms for reporting verbs, and this is an area in which English for Academic Purposes (EAP) materials and teachers are called upon to provide guidance. However, accounts of reporting verb usage have demonstrated that this is a complex area, and simple prescriptions or proscriptions are not suffi-cient: appropriate choices are dependent on the relationship between form and func-tion, both locally and globally in the citing text. The present paper extends the exist-ing research literature on reporting verbs by examining some of the factors which guide the citing writer’s choices. Implications for the EAP classroom are also taken up.

  • 15. Pecorari, Diane
    Focus on Learner Discourse2009In: Academic writing: At the interface of corpus and discourse / [ed] M. Charles, D. Pecorari & S. Hunston, London: Continuum, 2009, p. 191-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16. Pecorari, Diane
    Formulaic language in biology: A topic-specific investigation2009In: Academic writing: At the interface of corpus and discourse / [ed] M. Charles, D. Pecorari & S. Hunston, London: Continuum, 2009, p. 91-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Intertextuality and plagiarism2016In: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Hyland, K. & Shaw, P., London: Routledge, 2016, p. 230-242Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Multilingual Higher Education: Beyond English Medium Orientations2015In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 40, p. 59-60Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Plagiarism2012In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Carol Chapelle, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Plagiarism in second language writing: Is it time to close the case?2015In: Journal of second language writing, ISSN 1060-3743, E-ISSN 1873-1422, Vol. 30, p. 94-99Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Plagiarism, Intellectual Property and the Teaching of L2 Composition2013In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 122-123Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Plagiarism, International Students and the Second-Language Writer2015In: Handbook of Academic Integrity / [ed] Tracey Bretag, Berlin: Springer, 2015, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plagiarism is a particularly complex issue because it straddles the boundary between academic integrityand academic literacy. Academic texts are widely understood to involve complex and precise expressionand rhetorical sophistication. Learning to write them is rarely easy, but writers who are working through asecond language face an additional challenge. Because of a trend toward increased international mobility among students, the number of inexperienced academic writers using a second language is large and rising rapidly. If, as it has been suggested, this group is especially likely to be charged with plagiarism, then there is a real danger both to the students in this group and to standards of academic integrity. This chapter examines the aspects of plagiarism which are of particular relevance to second-language writers, identifies potential problem areas, and suggests solutions.

  • 23.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Mälardalens University.
    Repeated language in academic discourse: The case of biology background statements2008In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 9-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Teaching to avoid plagiarism: How to promote good source use2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Textual plagiarism: How should it be regarded?2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The hole in the donut: The shape of second-language writing studies in Sweden2016In: L2 writing in the global context: Represented, underrepresented, and unrepresented voices, Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press, 2016, p. 227-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Writing from sources, plagiarism and textual borrowing2016In: Handbook of second and foreign language writing / [ed] Rosa Manchón and Paul Kei Matsuda, Walter de Gruyter, 2016, p. 329-347Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Petrić, Bojana
    University of Essex.
    Plagiarism in second-language writing2014In: Language Teaching, ISSN 0261-4448, E-ISSN 1475-3049, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 269-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plagiarism is a broad and multidisciplinary field of study, and within second-language (L2) writing, research on the topic goes back to the mid-1980s. In this review article we first discuss the received view of plagiarism as a transgressive act and alternative understandings which have been presented in the L1 and L2 writing literature. We then survey and identify salient themes in the growing body of work relating to plagiarism, primarily from an L2 writing/applied linguistic perspective. These themes include terminological distinctions; views of the role of textual plagiarism in language learning and a writer's development; a concern with students’ and teachers’ sometimes differing understanding of plagiarism; and disciplinary differences in perceptions of plagiarism. We review research into the role of the electronic media in changing orientations toward plagiarism, the potential role of culture as a cause of plagiarism in the work of L2 writers, and pedagogical approaches to guiding students away from plagiarism. Methodological issues in researching plagiarism are surveyed, and the article concludes by suggesting directions for future research.

  • 29.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Intertextuality in academic and non-academic texts: What are the sources and outcomes for EAP writers?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality in its broadest sense—the relationship between two texts—is a pervasive feature of academic writing, as manifested by features such as citations to earlier texts and the sets of features such as structure and organisation which are shared by texts in a given genre and/or academic discipline.

     

    Many of the intertextual features of academic writing, such as the choice of reporting verb and verb form, have been thoroughly researched and described (e.g., Charles, 2006; Shaw, 1992). Much is also know about a specific, highly problematic form of intertextuality: plagiarism (e.g., Pecorari & Shaw, 2012). However, less attention has been given to the ways in which novice academic writers become aware of conventional intertextual practices, and less still to the transferability of this feature to writing in the workplace.

     

    This paper will present the results of a corpus-based investigation of intertextuality in two domains: the leisure-time reading which lower-division undergraduates do, and a common workplace genre.  By triangulating the results from these two corpora with existing findings about the intertextual features of academic texts it will be possible to describe the extent to which these features overlap with, or diverge from, each other.  This will thus provide an indication of the features which can reasonably be expected to transfer from one domain to another, and which cannot, and should therefore be the subject of explicit instruction in the English for Specific Academic Purposes classroom.

     

  • 30.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Types of student intertextuality and faculty attitudes2012In: Journal of second language writing, ISSN 1060-3743, E-ISSN 1873-1422, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 149-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality is a prominent feature of academic writing, and the ability to use sources effectively and appropriately is an essential skill which novice writers must acquire. It is also a complex skill, and student performance is not always successful. It is presumably beneficial for students to receive consistent messages about what source use is and is not appropriate, but some evidence suggests that university teachers and other gatekeepers may fall short of this consistency. This paper reports the findings of semi-structured text-based interviews aimed at understanding the basis of teacher attitudes and responses to intertextuality in academic writing. Teachers who were asked to evaluate the same examples from student texts differed in their judgments about whether the examples were appropriate, and provided different types of explanation for their judgments. These explanations enable us to develop a four-part typology of intertextuality which allows analytic discussion of differing judgments. The implications both of the teacher judgments and of the typology for second language writing instruction are discussed and an assessment of the relevance of our findings for the theme of this special issue is provided.

  • 31. Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    University teachers discussing plagiarism: Divided perspectives on teaching writing and shaping a culture of honesty2010In: 4th International Plagiarism Conference 2010 Conference Proceedings & Abstracts: Towards an Authentic Future, nLearning , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Edinburgh University.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    English textbooks in parallel-language tertiary education2011In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 313-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tertiary education in many countries is increasingly bilingual, with English used in parallel with the national language, particularly as a reading language. This article describes the results of a survey of student attitudes toward, and reading practices regarding, English language textbooks. Over 1,000 students at three Swedish universities responded to a questionnaire asking about their experiences with English textbooks. Textbooks written in English were generally unpopular, and the perception was widespread that they placed a greater burden on students. However, respondents were divided about whether their reading behavior and their learning outcomes were affected by having a textbook in English, and about whether English texts were desirable. The findings of this study have implications for teaching practices in contexts in which students are asked to read, or are being prepared to read, in a second language. Implications for the English as a foreign language or English as a second language classroom are discussed.

  • 33.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Reading in tertiary education: Undergraduate student practices and attitudes2012In: Quality in Higher Education, ISSN 1353-8322, E-ISSN 1470-1081, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 235-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the findings of a study of undergraduate student use of, and attitudes toward, textbooks and other assigned reading. More than 1200 students of various subjects at three Swedish universities were surveyed. Most students said reading played an important role in learning generally and attributed positive characteristics to their textbooks. However, students’ self-reported reading behaviour was at odds with these attitudes, with many students reporting some degree of non-compliance with reading assignments and a small group of students expressing active resistance to completing reading assignments. Although textbooks were perceived as valuable, students reported a preference for learning course content from other resources, such as lectures and lecture notes. Textbooks were perceived as alternatives, rather than complements, to attending class. Differences were found across academic disciplines. Implications of these findings for educational administration and classroom practice are discussed.

  • 34.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Alieen
    Edinburgh University.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    English for academic purposes at Swedish univerities: Teachers' objectives and practices2011In: Iberica, ISSN 1139-7241, Vol. 22, p. 55-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a parallel-language environment the use of textbooks in English in coursesotherwise in the local language is naturalized and not widely discussed orquestioned. The aim of this study was to elicit the attitudes and syllabusinfrastructure that underlie the practice. A large-scale survey was carried out andanswers were obtained from over 20% of teachers at Swedish universities.Results confirmed that a majority regarded English as important during and/orafter university studies and showed that they considered the use of Englishlanguagetextbooks as providing a useful opportunity for incidental languagelearning. In strong contrast to the situation in a content and language integratedlearning environment, only a small minority of courses were reported to haveany specified learning outcome related to English. Open answers showedawareness of the benefits and risks of parallel-language practices, but no interestin making aims explicit. In our view, there is no contradiction between incidental learning and explicit aims, and course aims which remain implicit make rationalplanning and constructive alignment more difficult. They also inhibit discussionof appropriate methodology.

  • 35.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    English Textbooks in Parallel-language Tertiary Education2015In: English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Basturkmen, H., London: Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Engelska på köpet?: Implicit språkinlärning i den parallelspråkiga högskolan2012In: Resultatdialog 2012, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2012, p. 153-166Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Intertextual episodes in lectures: A  classification from the perspective of incidental learning from reading2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a parallel language environment it is important that teaching takes account of both the languages students areexpected to work in. Lectures in the mother tongue need to offer access to textbooks in English and encouragementto read. This paper describes a preliminary study for an investigation of the extent to which they actually do so.A corpus of lectures in English for mainly L1 English students (from BASE and MICASE) was examined for thetypes of reference to reading which occur, classifi ed by their potential usefulness for access and encouragement. Suchreferences were called ‘intertextual episodes’. Seven preliminary categories of intertextual episode were identifi ed. Insome disciplines the text is the topic of the lecture rather than a medium for information on the topic, and this categorywas not pursued further. In the remaining six the text was a medium for information about the topic. Three of theminvolved management, of texts by the lecturer her/himself, of student writing, or of student reading. The remainingthree involved reference to the content of the text either introducing it to students, reporting its content, or, really themost interesting category, relativizing it and thus potentially encouraging critical reading. Straightforward reportingthat certain content was in the text at a certain point was the most common type, followed by management of studentreading. Relativization was relatively infrequent. The exercise has provided us with categories which can be used for anexperimental phase where the effect of different types of reference can be tested, and for observation of the referencesactually used in L1 lectures in a parallel-language environment.

  • 38.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholms University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Source use in academic writing: An introduction to the special issue2013In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 12, no 2, p. A1-A3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Types of intertextuality in chairman's statements2013In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality is a pervasive feature of all discourse, but norms and conventions vary widely across domains. Academic conventions can cause difficulties for those who have been exposed to, or move on to, domains with other practices. Academic conventions are well documented; here we examine those of business writing. We created a corpus of chairman’s statements from annual corporate reports and searched them for signalled and unsignalled intertextual relationships. We hypothesise that statements from the same company will be linked by both repeated phraseology and acknowledged intertextuality.

  • 40.
    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy
    et al.
    Monash University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Policy and practice in two academic settings: how the administrative structures of Australian and Swedish universities serve a culture of honesty2010In: Proceedings of the 4th International Plagiarism Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although institutional plagiarism policies around the world vary greatly in terms of the degree of specificity in their provisions, many share a number of common characteristics. Policies typically describe mechanisms according to which suspected individuals can be first judged, and then, if found guilty, sanctioned. Extending the criminal justice metaphor further, institutional policies and procedures for dealing with suspected instances of plagiarism can be said to have two closely related objectives: to identify and punish the guilty (while not mistakenly identifying or punishing the innocent) and to use the threat of detection and punishment to deter transgressive behaviour. The intrinsic value of both of these objectives is clear, but the extent to which institutional practices meet them depends not only on effective detection and deterrence, but also on promoting student learning. This paper questions the extent to which a culture of detection and deterrence promotes the core business of learning in two very different contexts, Sweden and Australia. Swedish universities are (with a single exception) within the public sector and funded, run and regulated by central government.

    Australian universities, by contrast, are much more heterogeneous in the way that policies are developed and implemented. The language, as well as the process, for plagiarism management varies across institutions By comparing institutional approaches to plagiarism management in different national contexts, we explore ways in which cultures of honesty are shaped at the level of policy. What are the expectations of universities about promoting ethical learning and establishing a culture of academic honesty in their learning spaces? How are these expectations envisaged in policy? Are these visions achieved in practice? In addressing these issues through an analysis of policy documents and interview data from teaching staff, plagiarism policies apparently focus on detection and deterrence mechanisms at the expense of promoting learning for students. In both Sweden and Australia it appears that existing disciplinary mechanisms disappoint staff in their efforts to shape a culture of honesty.

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