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  • 1.
    Bjärsholm, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Gerrevall, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Norbeg, Johan R.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Sweden;Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    A methodological tool for researching Sport and Social Entrepreneurship2018In: Sport and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden / [ed] Tomas Peterson, Katarina Schenker, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 113-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bjärsholm, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Gerrevall, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ethical considerations in researching sport and social entrepreneurship2018In: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 216-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to discuss ethical dilemmas that occur in doing research on social entrepreneurial sport ventures. Three cases that highlight ethical dilemmas in research on social entrepreneurship and sport are presented and ethically reflected upon. The data comprise interviews with representatives, field notes from observations and analyses of documents concerning the ventures. Three things make research in this area extra problematic: first, ‘social good’ in social entrepreneurship and sport implies a normative perspective. It is permeated by ideology and ethics. Second, what is considered as ‘social good’ may differ between sectors of society as the entrepreneur crosses boundaries. What is valid as a resource and capital in one sector might not be so in another one, and what is legal within one sector may be illegal in another. Third, social entrepreneurs may have their own intentions with regard to participating in research, which may challenge our credibility as researchers. Therefore, we need, as professionals, to take a step back and be both critical of our work and make this criticism visible, which is to some extent what we are doing by writing this article.

  • 3.
    Bjärsholm, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Gerrevall, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Sweden;Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ethics in Researching Sport and Social Entrepreneurship2018In: Sport and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden / [ed] Tomas Peterson, Katarina Schenker, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 99-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bjärsholm, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Gerrevall, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö University.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Idrott och socialt entreprenörskap – en utmaning för idrottsrörelsen2016In: Idrottsforskaren, no 2, p. 49-54Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Socialt entreprenörskap kan ses som en kritik mot att samhällsstödet inte är tillräckligt. Kritiken kan vara riktad mot såväl det offentliga som det privata. De sociala entreprenörerna skapar en verksamhet som de erbjuder en viss målgrupp, som uppfattas vara i behov av just denna verksamhet. Och liksom målgruppen kan vara i behov av denna verksamhet så kan samhället också uppfattas behöva verksamheten. Ibland är det till och med så att staten ringar in problemen och ger idrottsrörelsen i uppdrag att lösa dem, vilket då kräver att den utmanar och utvecklar sin egen verksamhet.

  • 5.
    Bjärsholm, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Gerrevall, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Sweden;Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    The Cases2018In: Sport and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden / [ed] Tomas Peterson & Katarina Schenker, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 61-73Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fahlström, Per Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Gerrevall, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Att utveckla barns och ungdomars delaktighet och inflytande inom idrotten2015In: Idéer för idrottsutveckling / [ed] Josef Fahlén och Staffan Karp, Stockholm: SISU Idrottsböcker , 2015, p. 25-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Philpot, Rod
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Social Justice Pedagogies in School Health and Physical Education — Building Relationships, Teaching for Social Cohesion and Addressing Social Inequities2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, p. 1-17, article id 6904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on equity and social justice in school health and physical education (HPE) is pertinent in an era where there are growing concerns about the impact of neoliberal globalization and the precariousness of society. The aim of the present study was to identify school HPE teaching practices that promote social justice and more equitable health outcomes. Data were generated through 20 HPE lesson observations and post-lesson interviews with 13 HPE teachers across schools in Sweden, Norway, and New Zealand. The data were analysed following the principles of thematic analysis. In this paper, we present and discuss findings related to three overall themes: (i) relationships; (ii) teaching for social cohesion; (iii) and explicitly teaching about, and acting on, social inequities. Collectively, these themes represent examples of the enactment of social justice pedagogies in HPE practice. To conclude, we point out the diculty of enacting social justice pedagogies and that social justice pedagogies may not always transform structures nor make a uniform difference to all students. However, on the basis of our findings, we are rearmed in our view that HPE teachers can make a difference when it comes to contributing to more socially just and equitable outcomes in HPE and beyond.

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  • 8.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Philpot, Rod Allan
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Legge, Maureen
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts in Sweden, Norway and New Zealand2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 273-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way school Health and Physical Education (HPE) is conceptualized and taught will impact on its ability to provide equitable outcomes across gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and social class. A focus on social justice in HPE is pertinent in times when these ideals are currently under threat from neoliberal globalization. This paper draws on data from the initial year of an international collaboration project called ‘Education for Equitable Health Outcomes – The Promise of School Health and Physical Education’ involving HPE and Physical Education Teacher Education researchers from Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. The data in this paper record the researchers’ presentations and discussions about issues of social justice and health as informed by school visits and interviews with HPE teachers in the three different countries. The analysis of the data is focused on what is addressed in the name of social justice in each of the three countries and how cross-cultural researchers of social justice in HPE interpret different contexts. In order to analyse the data, we draw on Michael Uljens’s concepts of non-affirmative and non-hierarchical education. The findings suggest that researching social justice and health (in)equality across different countries offers both opportunities and challenges when it comes to understanding the enactment of social justice in school and HPE practices. We conclude by drawing on Uljens to assert that the quest for social justice in HPE should focus on further problematizing affirmative and hierarchical educational practices since social justice teaching strategies are enabled and constrained by the contexts in which they are practised.

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    fulltext
  • 9.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Philpot, Rod
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Sandford, Rachel
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Mooney, Amanda
    Deakin University, Australia.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Education for Social Justice – Social Justice Pedagogies in School Health and Physical Education2019In: ECER (European Conference on Educational Research), Hamburg, Germany, Sept 2-6, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a compulsory school subject in most Western societies, Health and Physical Education (HPE) is charged with providing important health outcomes for children and young people. The world summit on HPE in 1999, for example, stated that HPE provides the most effective means of providing all young people, regardless of their ability, disability, sex, age, culture, race, ethnicity, religion, or social background, with the skills, attitudes, knowledge, and understanding for lifelong health and well-being (Doll-Tepper & Scoretz, 2001). Morgan and Burke (2008) similarly argued that school HPE can make a unique contribution to the physical, cognitive, emotional and social health of children and young people. The authors of this proposed symposium share this vision for HPE but believe that positive health outcomes are accelerated when teachers of HPE are critically conscious and engage in socially-critical pedagogies that foreground inclusion, democracy, social justice and equity. The aim of this proposed symposium is to present and discuss the findings of a three-year international, collaborative research project called Education for Equitable Health Outcomes - The Promise of School Health and Physical Education (EDUHEALTH) consisting of Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) teachers and HPE researchers from Sweden, Norway and New Zealand.The EDUHEALTH project sought to identify school HPE teaching practices that promote social justice and more equitable health outcomes across the three different participating countries. A focus on equity, democracy and social justice in HPE is pertinent when education is in an era of risk where, for instance, these ideals are currently under threat from neoliberal globalization (Azzarito et al., 2017). Neoliberal approaches to health and education also tend to negatively impact on the most marginalized and/or minority groups in society (France and Roberts, 2017; Rashbrooke, 2013). Azzarito et al. (2017) further caution that school HPE curricula based on principles of global neoliberalism have emphasized competitive-based rather than equity-based goals, that in turn lead to the marginalization of the social justice project. In fact, research shows (Sirna, Tinning & Rossi, 2010) that many HPE teachers tend to be insensitive to such social justice issues.The session will begin with a brief introduction to the symposium and overview of the project, followed by the first paper which will discuss our conceptualisation of social justice in relation to HPE and present the methodology of the project with a focus on the analysis. This paper examines the concept of social justice in HPE as constituted and addressed across the three different countries. As part of the methodological discussion we will describe how our tri-country research teams completed structured classroom observations informed by the principles of Critical Incident Technique (Tripp, 2012) and Stimulated Recall Interviews (Lyle, 2003). In this paper, we also explicate our iterative process of thematical analysis of the data generated. The second paper will represent findings that elucidate how HPE practice can support social justice on three different levels: individual, group and society level. Additionally, the paper demonstrates how such teaching practices in HPE can relate to social justice in different ways as shaped by the context within which they occur. Employing new institutional theory (Scott 2007), we draw attention to how social justice pedagogies are informed differently by institutionalised governing systems and may act differently in different societies and teachers’ work. The third paper will represent and discuss findings relating to HPE teaching practices about and forsocial justice. The findings presented in this paper will be analysed by drawing on the principles of social justice pedagogies (Tinning, 2016) and transformative pedagogy (Ovens & Philpot, in press). This paper will also address the implications of the EDUHEALTH project for HPE and PETE practice. 

  • 10.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Philpot, Rod
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Teaching for Student and Societal Wellbeing in HPE: Nine Pedagogies for Social Justice2021In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 3, article id 702922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We currently find ourselves living in precarious times (Kirk, 2020), with old and new social inequities on the rise due to the challenges associated with an unprecedented rise of global migration and neoliberalism, amplified in our post COVID-19 world. Wilkinson and Pickett (2010) have demonstrated that there is a high correlation between inequality at the societal level and the overall health and wellbeing of individuals within those societies. We believe that school health and physical education (HPE) has a significant role to play in addressing and acting on social inequities that impact on the wellbeing of both students and society as a whole. Based on the findings of an international research project called EDUHEALTH which explored pedagogies for social justice in school health and physical education (HPE) across Sweden, Norway and New Zealand, this paper aims to highlight the addressing of (in)equality and student wellbeing through HPE practice. In particular, the paper presents nine different but complementary pedagogies for social justice that we believe can improve individual, collective and societal wellbeing. We conclude by proposing that, if adopted across a whole school curriculum, these nine pedagogies for social justice could form the basis of a holistic school-wide community approach aimed at improving both student and societal wellbeing.

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  • 11.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Phipot, Rod
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    EDUHEALTH – What have we learnt about pedagogies for social justice and implications for HPE practice2021In: Presented at ECER 2021, European Conference on Educational Research, Geneva, Switzerland, 6-10 Sept 2021, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a compulsory school subject in most Western societies, Health and Physical Education (HPE) is charged with providing important health outcomes for children and young people. However, as HPE teacher educators and researchers, we recognise and acknowledge that the way HPE is often taught and conceptualised in schools does not always provide equitable health outcomes across gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and social class (Fitzpatrick, 2019). Although HPE has the potential to contribute to lifelong health and well-being, it can be counter-productive and in fact be unhealthy for some students (Schenker, 2018). That is, despite decades of research and curricula reform, HPE continues to make both friends and enemies (Evans, 1986). Öhman et al. (2014), for instance, highlighted how HPE is often strongly influenced by neoliberal individualism, where students are seen to be responsible for their own health and the students themselves rather than society are solely blamed for their ‘failure’ to achieve health. Unfortunately, the role of HPE in contributing to, or challenging, such an ideological perspective is seldom considered. Neoliberal approaches to health also tend to negatively impact on the most marginalised and/or minority groups in society (France & Roberts, 2017). Azzarito et al. (2017) further cautioned that school HPE curricula based on principles of neoliberal individualism have emphasised competitive-based rather than equity-based goals, that in turn lead to the marginalisation of the social justice project. In fact, research shows that many HPE teachers tend to be insensitive to such social justice issues (Sirna, Tinning & Rossi, 2010).A focus on equity and social justice in HPE is therefore pertinent in an era where there are growing concerns about the impact of neoliberal globalization and the precariousness of society (Kirk. 2020). The aim of the EDUHEALTH project was to identify successful school HPE teaching practices that promote social justice and equitable health outcomes. In this paper will provide a summary of the project and its findings including critical commentary and reflections on the implications of the project for future HPE practice and research.

    Data were generated through 20 HPE lesson observations and post-lesson interviews with 13 HPE teachers across schools in Sweden, Norway, and New Zealand.The data collection was based on the principles of critical incident technique (CIT) methodology (Tripp, 2012) and stimulated recall interviews (Lyle, 2003). CIT was developed to capture not only the actions, but also the thought processes and the perspectives of teachers in relation to critical incidents. In the EDUHEALTH project, we employed CIT to explore the thought processes and actions of HPE teachers with a narrow focus on teaching for equity and social justice (Philpot, et al., 2020).The study participants were 13 teachers purposively selected (Bryman 2016) from four schools in Aotearoa New Zealand, four in Sweden and three in Norway. The teachers were known by the research team to be examples of teachers who embrace a social justice agenda in their pedagogy. The seven male and six female teachers ranged in age from 25 to 55 with between 3- and 25- years teaching experience.The classroom observations, which focused on incidents that appeared to be addressing issues of social justice, were restricted to compulsory HPE classes with 13–15-year-old students in co-educational schools. To gain a deeper understanding of the teachers thinking, we questioned the teacher about what we had observed through subsequent stimulated recall interviews. The interviews lasted 40-70 min and took place immediately after, or almost immediately after, the observed lessons. These stimulated-recall interviews created a nuanced and shared understanding of the teachers’ practices related to social justice pedagogies in HPE.Data were analysed through a six-phase thematic analysis approach that consisted of familiarisation with data, initial and advanced coding, identifying and naming themes and reporting findings (Braun and Clarke 2013).

    The findings presented in this paper will show how pedagogies for social justice in HPE were enacted through building relationships, teaching for social cohesion and explicitly teaching about, and acting on, social inequities. Collectively, these findings represent the enactment of the pedagogies for social justice that we observed in the EDUHEALTHproject. Based on these findings and as implications for HPE practice we then outline what we call the ‘nine pedagogical pillars of social justice in HPE’ which include: pedagogies of care for all students; pedagogies of understanding; pedagogies of inclusion; pedagogies that build relationships; pedagogies that foster reciprocal respect; democratic pedagogies; pedagogies for social cohesion; culturally relevant pedagogies; and explicit pedagogies for social justice. We argue that pedagogies for social justice can have elements of humanism  that attend to the needs of students within the structures of each society, but also challenge these structures and scaffold students to reflect and act and provide them with the agency to address equity issues in their lives and the lives of those around them. Weconclude by calling for the further development of pedagogies for social justice in HPE, which involve the problematising knowledge construction and how the dominant ways of thinking about physical activity, health, the body and self, have come to be, and where students are challenged to change the structures that create social inequities (Tinning, 2012).

  • 12.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Democracy, Equity and Social Justice: The constitution of ‘health’ in Swedish physical education and health2021In: Critical Pedagogies in Physical Education, Physical Activity and Health / [ed] Stirrup, Julie;Hooper, Oliver, London, UK: Routledge, 2021, p. 27-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like in many countries around the world, such as the UK, Australia and the US, a broader notion of ‘health’ was introduced in the Swedish Physical Education and Health (PEH) curriculum several years ago. In the current Swedish PEH curriculum, this broader notion of health, which includes a focus on physical but also mental health, as well as social well-being, along with aspects of democracy and societal values, is directed towards enhancing pupils’ capacity to contribute to the development of society, where the core Swedish societal values of democracy, equity and social justice are particularly emphasised. Furthermore, the focus of Swedish PEH is not only on being physically educated but also enhancing pupils’ awareness of, and critical reflection on, how their participation in different movement contexts impacts on others’ health. In this chapter, we provide an overview and critical interrogation of Swedish PEH with a particular focus on how notions of health underpinned by societal values of democracy, equity and social justice work together to produce PEH curriculum and practice in Sweden. At the same time, we provide a critique of such curricula and practices related to health within Swedish PEH by illustrating how this can still, at times, result in pupils being positioned as solely responsible for their own health. Towards the end of the chapter, we report on and discuss an international research project that has explored what PEH that embraces democracy, equity and social justice in relation to health can look like, before offering points for reflection.

  • 13.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Socialt rättvis och inkluderande undervisning i idrott och hälsa,2022In: Preseterad på SVEBI (Svensk Förening för Beteende- och Samhällsvetenskaplig Idrottsforskning), Malmö, Sverige, 11–12 november, 2022, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion I kursplanen för ämnet idrott och hälsa för grundskolan i Sverige betonas bland annat att undervisningen ska ge förutsättningar för alla elever att kontinuerligt kunna delta och lära sig (Skolverket, 2020). Trots det visar Skolinspektionens (2018) senaste kvalitetsgranskning att var femte elev på högstadiet inte deltar regelbundet i undervisningen. Även om många unga uttrycker entusiasm för skolämnet idrott och hälsa, känner andra sig exkluderade och till och med hatar ämnet (Robinson & Randall, 2016). Traditionella former av innehåll och det sätt undervisningen genomförs på innebär att eleverna försätts i priviligierade eller marginaliserade positioner (Gerdin & Pringle, 2017; Thorjussen & Sisjord, 2020). Det handlar både om att rådande samhälleliga sociala ojämlikheter reproduceras i ämnet (Evans, 2014) och att implicita för givet tagna föreställningar om ämnet genomsyrar undervisningens utformning (Flintoff & Dowling, 2017). Syfte och teoretisk ram Syftet med studie var att öka förståelsen för hur lärare i idrott och hälsa kan bedriva en inkluderande undervisning som kännetecknas av social rättvisa och där alla elever har möjlighet att delta och lyckas. Studien genomfördes inom ramen för ett internationellt samarbetsprojekt EDUHEALTH mellan forskare från Sverige, Norge och Nya Zeeland som undersökte hur lärare i idrott och hälsa hanterar frågor om inkludering, jämlikhet och social rättvisa i undervisningen.

    Metod I den del av studien som redovisas här ingår data från observationer av fem lärares undervisning i idrott och hälsa i åk 7–9 på olika skolor i södra Sverige. Totalt genomfördes 7 observationer och 8 intervjuer. Den insamlade data från observationerna och intervjuerna analyserades sedan med hjälp av tematisk analys (Braun & Clarke, 2006). Resultat Resultat och analysen av observationer och intervjuer visar att lärarna i denna studie, i linje med Tinnings (2012) förståelse av inkluderande undervisning, använde sig av flera olika strategier och en hel verktygslåda av olika didaktiska handlingar för att motverka de ojämlika förutsättningar som elever omgärdas av när de kommer till undervisningen. De tre huvudteman som konstruerades baserat på resultat och analysen är: (1) skapa goda relationer med och mellan elever, (2) anpassningar för att utjämna ojämlikheter och (3) stötta de som behöver. Diskussion och slutsatser Att iscensätta en inkluderande undervisningsmiljö är komplex process, en process som handlar både om erkännande (North, 2008), ha kunskap om eleverna och det sociala sammanhanget (Tinning, 2012) och om att bryta mönster av förtryck och dominans (Young, 1990). Det handlar om att det varken är ämnets syfte eller innehåll som är ojämlikt (Røset, Green & Thurston, 2020) utan om att ständigt ”göra” val som innebär att alla elever inkluderas. I linje med Youngs (1990) tankar om social rättvisa, räcker det alltså inte med en omfördelning av resurser utan det krävs medvetna, aktiva didaktiska handlingar och val för att motverka de ojämlika förutsättningar som eleverna omgärdas av när de kommer till undervisningen i idrott och hälsa. Resultaten av denna studie ger dock exempel på hur detta är möjligt, där lärarna genom medvetna didaktiska val och handlingar och reflektion visar lärarna hur man kan ”göra” (Young, 1990) undervisning i idrott och hälsa mer socialt rättvis och inkluderande.

  • 14.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Petter Erik, Leirhaug
    Amanda, Mooney
    Rod, Philpot
    EDUHEALTH 2.0: (Re)examining and developing pedagogies for social justice in Health and Physical Education2022In: Presented at BERA (British Educational Research Association), Liverpool, UK, September 6-9, 2022, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and policy statements suggest that school Health and Physical Education (HPE) can make a unique contribution to the physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of young people (Opstoel et al., 2020; UNESCO, 2015). It can also provide opportunities for young people to develop the knowledge and skills needed to navigate and respond to the inequities and precarity (Kirk, 2020) that have been amplified in our post COVID-19 world. Despite the aforementioned potential of HPE, it does not always provide equitable opportunities for all students, and often excludes on the basis of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and social class (see e.g., Gerdin & Larsson, 2018; Landi, 2019).The aim of the EDUHEALTH 2.0 project, which brings together researchers from Sweden, Norway, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, is to identify, compare, co-design and support the enactment of social justice pedagogies in HPE that promote equitable learning experiences and outcomes. This project builds on the findings and outcomes of our previous EDUHEALTH project that called on HPE teacher observations and post observation critical incident interviews (Philpot et al, 2020), and identified how broader curricular and school policy interact to facilitate theenactment of social justice pedagogies in HPE. These pedagogies include building good relationships, teaching for social cohesion and explicitly teaching about and acting on social inequities (Gerdin et al., 2020).  EDUHEALTH 2.0 will build on this previous research by exploring how HPE curricula serves to enable pedagogies for social justice and the students’ perspectives and experiences of such pedagogical practices as well as further developing and supporting the enactment of social justice pedagogies across different contexts through action-research with teachers.This proposed symposium will outline the methodological framework for EDUHEALTH 2.0 and report on some initial findings of the project to date.

  • 15.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Chambers, Fiona
    University College Cork, Ireland.
    Philpot, Rod
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Legge, Maureen
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts2018In: European Conference on Educational Research, ECER 2018, Bolzano, 3-7 Sept, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although school Health and Physical Education (HPE) has the potential to contribute to lifelong health and well-being, the way HPE isconceptualized and taught will impact on its ability to provide equitable outcomes across gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and socialclass. The genesis of this symposium comes from the ongoing international collaboration project - Education for Equitable HealthOutcomes - The Promise of School Health and Physical Education (EDUHEALTH) consisting of Physical Education Teacher Education(PETE) teachers and researchers from Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. The aim of the EDUHEALTH project is to contribute to theunderstanding of how teachers of HPE teach for social justice by examining the teaching practices of teachers. A focus on equity,democracy and social justice in HPE can be seen as particularly pertinent in times when these ideals are currently under threat fromneoliberal globalisation (Azzarito, Macdonald, Dagkas & Fisette, 2017). The research question guiding this project are: (i) How do HPE teachers’ practices address democracy and social justice? (ii) How may HPE practice contribute to greater inclusion and equitable health outcomes for all students? The session will begin with an introduction to the symposium followed by the first part of paper one which will provide a brief overview ofthe background and implementation of the EDUHEALTH project to date.The second paper will then explicate our conceptualisation of the term social justice as concerned with equity, taking account of many variables including gender, sexuality, socioeconomic, and ethnicity, and within the context of HPE, physicality. The discussion on this paper will draw on Bell’s (1997) concept of social justice as both a process and a goal along with Wright’s (2004) claim that a pedagogy focused on social justice embraces emancipatory practices or processes that have the goal of helping students identify, challenge and transform existing unequal power relations relating to physical activity and health. In this paper we will also discuss the different theoretical perspectives that we are considering in relation to understanding and subsequently analysing social justice in HPE as informed by the works of, for instance, Habermas, Bourdieu, Foucault and Uljens. The third paper will then discuss our methodology and methods for generating data involving HPE class observations and teacher interview in the three different countries and employing a critical incident technique (Tripp, 2012) along with stimulated-recall interviews toexplore HPE teaching practices that enact socially-critical perspective of physical activity and health. At the conclusion of the third paper we will return to the first paper and draw on some initial findings of this project to date in terms of the potential, and difficulties, of researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts. The potential comes from having outsiders critically examining the societal, educational, and HPE context and offering new insights. The difficulties are in reaching a shared understanding of what it means to be socially critical and applying this understanding in each of the three different contexts. At the end we tentatively suggest that in our ongoing work with this project and by drawing on Freire (2000) and Tinning (2010) that there is no ‘holy grail’ in terms of a social justice teaching method for HPE practice since teaching strategies are enabled and constrained by the contexts in which they are practiced. Finally, a discussant will reflect on the work presented and the nature of the project before opening the floor to the audience for the final 20 minutes of the symposium.

  • 16.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Philpot, Rod
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Social Justice Pedagogies in Health and Physical Education2021Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book makes the case that school Health and Physical Education (HPE) can make a unique contribution to young people’s physical, emotional and social health outcomes when teachers of HPE engage in pedagogies for social justice that emphasise inclusion, democracy and equity.

    Drawing on observations and teacher interviews across Sweden, Norway and New Zealand, the book explores successful school teaching practices that promote social justice and equitable health outcomes. In particular, it draws attention to the importance of building relationships, teaching for social cohesion and explicitly teaching about and acting on social inequities as pedagogies for social justice. The book also argues that context matters and that pedagogies for social justice need to recognise how both approaches to, and focus on, social justice vary in different contexts.

    This is essential reading for academics and students interested in social justice and working in the fields of education, HPE and teacher education.

  • 17.
    Hedenborg, Susanna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Malmö högskola.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Malmö högskola.
    Tolvhed, Helena
    Stockholms universitet.
    Fler stannar men färre börjar?2012In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 51-54Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Idrottslyftet har allt mer blivit en del av förbundens ordinarie verksamhet.Satsningen har öppnat dörrarna för fler, men få har klivit övertröskeln. En stor del av medlen har hamnat i stora idrotter och hos desocioekonomiskt välmående i tätbefolkade kommuner.

  • 18. Hedenborg, Susanna
    et al.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Malmö university.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Tolvhed, Helena
    Idrottslyftets externa utvärdering: Svenska Klätterförbundet, Svenska Orienteringsförbundet, Svenska Ridsportförbundet, Svenska Simförbundet och Svenska Taekwondoförbundet.2012Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Larsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    The doxa of physical education teacher education – set in stone?2018In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 114-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we critically examine the potential of assessment components in physical education teacher education (PETE) to either reinforce or challenge PETE students’ conceptions of what a physical education (PE) teacher needs to know to teach this school subject. To understand the mechanisms that may contribute to the difficulty of challenging these taken-for-granted beliefs (doxa) within PETE, we draw on the theories and concepts of Pierre Bourdieu. Two different kinds of empirical material are analysed: one consists of 62 essays, written by PETE students before starting their degree programme, dealing with their conceptions of PE teachers’ competencies, while the second consists of course booklets and assessment components used within one PETE programme. The study shows that implicit prerequisites and conditions in assessment components are very similar to the conceptions of competencies in PETE students’ statements. The study also shows that taken-for-granted beliefs may be challenged, but at the same time, we argue, the use of socially critical perspectives in PE practice may also (in the name of the doxa) stigmatise those who are not physically active in their leisure time as well as those who do not look fit and sporty, and thus does not challenge the way power and social superiority or inferiority appear in PE.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Socialt rättvis och inkluderande undervisning i idrott och hälsa2023In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 109-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den studie som ligger till grund för artikeln var att öka förståelsen för hur lärare i idrott och hälsa kan bedriva en inkluderande undervisning som kännetecknas av social rättvisa och där alla elever har möjlighet att delta och lyckas. Studien genomfördes inom ramen för ett internationellt samarbetsprojekt som undersökte hur lärare i idrott och hälsa hanterar frågor om inkludering, jämlikhet och social rättvisa i undervisningen. I denna artikel redovisas resultat från observationer av undervisning i idrott och hälsa i årskurs 7 till 9 i Sverige med tillhörande intervjuer av fem lärare i ämnet. Resultaten visar att lärarna använde sig av flera olika strategier kopplat till tre huvudteman: (1) skapa goda relationer med och mellan elever, (2) anpassningar för att utjämna ojämlikheter och (3) stötta de som behöver. Trots de goda exempel som lyfts i denna artikel, behöver undervisningspraktiker vidareutvecklas som inte bara hanterar utan även kan utmana och förändra rådande normer och värderingar i ämnet.

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  • 21.
    Larsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Challenging PETE. Steering mechanisms and teaching logics preserving old traditions2017In: ECER (European Conference on Educational Research), Köpenhamn, Danmark, 22-25/8 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary physical education in Sweden is characterized by a strong tradition of sport and ball games which school curriculumreforms in the last few decades seem to have had no significant impact on. Despite new curricula in Sweden, HPE teachers’ practicesremain unchanged. HPE teachers still have problems catering to the needs of all their pupils (Annerstedt & Larsson, 2010; Ekberg, 2016;Redelius et al. 2009). Success in PE in the form of high grades is related to active participation in sport clubs (Jakobsson et al., 2012).One of the government’s instruments for regulating teaching in PE in schools in Sweden is teacher education. The latest reforms ofSwedish teacher education including physical education teacher education (PETE) place higher scientific/academic demands on teachereducation programmes. One of the goals is to develop PETE students’ ability to adopt socially critical approaches and the studentsshould, for instance, be provided opportunities to identify, analyse and question the different beliefs, norms and values that pervade PEand that may act to exclude some pupils (SOU, 2008). However, research indicates that despite these reforms, Swedish PETE does notchallenge students’ conceptions about how the subject should be taught to any great extent (Schenker, 2016). The PETE students’ stillwant to pursue their passion for sport through teaching practices designed to lead to their pupils (even the uninterested ones) developingthe same sport interests (Larsson, 2009). Larsson et al. (2016) found that although socially critical perspectives exists in PETE today,reforming the PETE curriculum per se does not necessarily challenge the doxa of PETE. As a matter of fact, the use of socially criticalperspectives in PETE may (in the name of the doxa) not challenge how power and social superiority or inferiority appear in the subject.Doxa might not be set in stone, but there seems to be a need to thoroughly reconstruct PETE if future PE teachers are going to developsocially critical approaches that truly challenge the prevailing assumptions about what competencies a PE teacher should have. In thispaper the key members from Sweden involved in the EDUHEALTH project will share some of their research findings to date. We willdiscuss mechanisms that may contribute to the difficulty of challenging taken for granted beliefs within Swedish PETE and how and whyteachers’ presumptions and teaching logics, like the one of competitive sport, continue to exclude some children and youth.

  • 22.
    Larsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Transition within PETE - is challenging the doxa possible?2015In: ECER 2015, Education and Transtition. Network:18. Research in Sports Pedagogy, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time after time Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) and Health and Physical Education (HPE) are identified as learning areas where the ‘power of tradition’ remain strong. The history of and transition within PETE and HPE has neither been struggle- nor problem-free. Neither the reformation of PETE nor the shift in the HPE curriculum appears to be able to challenge the teacher student’ understandings [1]. Instead, certain beliefs, norms and values continue to be reproduced in PETE regardless of the criticisms offered. By everyone accepting ‘the rules of the game’ [2], they cannot reflect on, challenge, argue in favour of, or fight over the logic of the dominant practice or what types of knowledge that are seen as important and therefore have its legitimate place in the PETE programme. Within PETE there exists taken for granted assumptions that reflect its history, content, structure, the type of student who enrolls and the outcome for the students at the end of the programme [3].

    Although one of the goals of most contemporary PETE programmes is to develop the students’ ability to adopt critical approaches and perspectives, several scholars argue that a completely new university programme is needed if future HPE teachers are going to develop socially-critical approaches [4].

    Aim & Research Questions

    Based on the discussion above it is of research significance to examine the beliefs about what kind of competencies future HPE teachers need to develop throughout their degree. The purpose of this study was to explore what kind of beliefs about HPE teachers’ competencies that are expressed, assessed, reinforced or challenged throughout the degree. The focus of analysis is particularly on what beliefs about the structure and content of PETE are in tension with each other.

    Research questions:

    • What teacher competencies are seen as important to develop throughout the degree by the teacher students?
    • What competencies are being assessed in PETE assessments?
    • What beliefs about HPE teachers’ competencies are reinforced or challenged in and through these assessments?

    Theoretical frame

    To understand what the possibilities/constraints are for a challenging and critically reflective learning to occur within HPETE we draw on the theories and concepts of Pierre Bourdieu [4]. Bourdieu uses the concept of social fields to explain how, within a specific social context, there is a logic and rules about the practice [5]. These rules are the result of the historical struggles within the field and have shaped prevailing beliefs, or the ‘doxa’, that everyone in the field are aware of. Doxa represents the collective beliefs, norms and attitudes about the ideal or ‘right’ practice and if these are not questioned and challenged continues both to guide and limit what is possible and not possible.

    Our point of departure is that PETE can be seen as an encounter between individuals from different backgrounds and with various experiences and the objective structures of an education programme. An education programme’s objective structures contain notions, values, norms and practices that constitute what is deemed relevant and valuable knowledge [6] Participants are individuals, but at the same time they find themselves in a context involving a number of socially constructed rules and notions about what is possible and right, as well as the opposite, i.e. what is inconceivable. Although PETE is not a social field, strictly speaking, in accordance with Bourdieu's definition, the taken for granted assumptions about what constitute a ‘competent’ teacher of HPE still represent a form of doxa. What is considered to be the ‘right’ practice, and valued forms of knowledge is also reflected in what is being assessed.

    Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources UsedIn order to address our research questions we have drawn on three different sources of empirical data. The first source of data consists of open-ended, qualitative questionnaires completed by recently enrolled teacher students at two different PETE programmes. At one university the questionnaires were conducted during a lecture, with a total of 35 students completing them on that occasion and another 3 students at a later date. At the other university the students were given the questionnaires by one of the teacher educators and all of them were subsequently submitted electronically. The total number of questionnaires analyzed were 62. The second source of data involves course booklets from one university, where the focus particularly was on the different forms of assessment. The booklets from all the courses within the PETE programme except the individual research projects, in total 90 credits were included. The course booklets contain detailed information and descriptions of all forms of assessment within the degree. In total the courses contains 82 assessments. The third source of data comprises different types of assessment tasks and a selection of the students’ responses.   By conducting a qualitative text analysis the empirical data were examined in relation to the research questions and subsequently interpreted with the Bourdieuan theoretical framework described above as the starting point [6]. The number of assessments throughout the PETE programme was in a first step divided into type of assessment, subject area and verbs used to describe the assessments to identify the patterns of meaning and the scheme of classification. In the analysis of the assessment tasks and the students’ responses recurring patterns and themes were first identified before these patterns/themes were deconstructed and explored in more detail. Throughout this data analysis process we continually used our theoretical framework to sort through and categorize the data. The focus in the analysis of the data was on picking up both implicit and explicit expressions which reflected collective conceptions and taken for granted assumptions in relation to the PETE programme and HPE. Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or FindingsOur study demonstrates how those who enter PETE seem to be strongly influenced by their previous experience and knowledge of sport and physical activity. Underlying doxa and taken for granted ideas about sport and scientific assumptions seem impregnable The teacher students’ statements highlight collective beliefs, norms and attitudes about the ideal or ’right’  practice, what Bourdieu describes as “the rules of the game”. The image portrayed of the ‘competent’ teacher in HPE is of someone possessing all the knowledge, being the role model and the perfect example and also having the power to select what knowledge that should be taught. In addition, they see teaching/pedagogical skills as crucial. The analysis of the assessments highlights an existing, prevailing doxa that both teacher students and teacher educators seem to agree upon. The results draw attention to how it is the different subject areas’ traditions, underlying principles of classification, which determine the type and number of assessments. The preliminary findings on the one hand indicate, much similar to previous studies, that there are a number of assessments that reinforce traditional notions of the ‘right’ practice in HPE. But on the other hand, there are also other forms of assessment, in particular in the social sciences, which have the potential to challenge the students’ understandings and to develop the students’ ability to adopt critical approaches. However, it is uncertain to what extent the students’ understandings are actually challenged particularly given their view of the teaching role, view of what competencies a HPE teachers need and beliefs about the content and structure of HPE. ReferencesBourdieu, Pierre (1990). The Logic of Practice. Cambridge: Polity Press Bourdieu, Pierre (1992). Texter om de intellektuella, Stockholm: Brutus Östlings bokförlag Brown, David (2005). An economy of gendered practices? Learning to teach physical education from the perspective of Pierre Bourdieu’s embodied sociology. Sport, Education and Society 10. Denzin, Norman K. & Lincoln, Yvonna S. (1998). Collecting and interpreting qualitative materials. London: Sage Publ.. Dowling, Fiona (2008). Getting in touch with our feelings: the emotional geographies of gender relations in Physical Education Teacher, Education.  Sport, Education & Society 3. Dowling, Fiona & Kårhus, Svein (2011). An analysis of the ideological work of the discourse of ‘fair play’ and moral education in perpetuating inequitable gender practices in PETE. Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy 2. Kirk, David, MacDonald, Doune & O’Sullivan, Mary (eds.) (2006). The Handbook of Physical Education. London: Sage Publications. Kirk, David (2010). Physical Education Futures. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. Larsson, Lena (2009). Idrott- och helst lite mer idrott. Idrottslärarsudenters möte med  utbildningen.  Diss. Stockholm university. [Sport – and preferably a little more sport. P. E.  students' encounter with the education.] MacDonald, Doune, Hunter, Lisa, Carlson, Teresa & Penney, Dawn (2002). Teacher Knowledge and the Disjunction between School Curricula and Teacher Education. Asia- Pasific Journal of Teacher Education 30. Matanin, Marcia & Collier, Connie (2003). Longitudinal Analysis of Preservice Teachers’ Beliefs About Teaching Physical Education. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education 22. Moen, Kjersti, M. (2011). “Shaking or stirring?” A case-study of physical education teacher education in Norway. Diss. Oslo: Norges idrettshøgskole. Rossi, Tony, Sirna, Karen & Tinning, Richard (2008). Becoming a health and physical education (HPE) teacher: Student teacher ‘Performances’ in the physical education subject department office. Teacher and Teaching Education 24. Tinning, Richard (2004). Rethinking the preparation of HPE teachers: ruminations on knowledge,  identity, and ways of thinking, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, vol. 32, nr. 3. Tinning, Richard (2012). A socially critical HPE (aka physical education) and the challenge for teacher education. In: Barry Down and John Smyth (eds.) Critical voices in teacher education: teaching for social justice in conservative times. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

  • 23.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Ämnesöverskridande arbete för integrering av skolämnens kunskaps- och demokratiuppdrag2022In: Didaktikens språk: Om skolundervisningens mål, innehåll och form / [ed] Nordin, Andreas;Uljens, Michael, Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2022, p. 61-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Linnér, Susanne
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Philpot, Rod
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Moen, Kjersti Mordal
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Smith, Wayne
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    The enactment of social justice in HPE practice: how context(s) comes to matter2022In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 228-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than 40 years, health and physical education (HPE) academics in universities and teacher education colleges have drawn attention to issues of social justice specific to the context of PE and advocated for teachers in fields, gymnasiums and other physical activity spaces to do a better job of promoting more equitable outcomes for all students. Building on this advocacy, in the late 1990s, countries such as Sweden, Norway and New Zealand designed HPE curricula that address social justice. However, limited research has focused specifically on the enactment of social justice in HPE practice. Drawing on a larger international project involving Sweden, Norway and New Zealand the aim of this article is therefore to explore the constitution of social justice pedagogies across these three different HPE contexts and more specifically how HPE teaching practice may be understood from regulative, normative and cultural perspectives on social justice. The data reported on in this paper were generated from educational acts, curriculum documents, observations of HPE lessons in each of the three countries and follow-up teacher interviews. In order to analyse the data, we employed Scott's (2008. Institutions and organizations: Ideas and interests (3rd ed). Sage) institutional theory to further understand and discuss the enactment of social justice across the three different countries in HPE practice. In our representation and analysis of the findings we draw attention to how social justice pedagogies are informed differently by institutionalised governing systems and therefore they may be enacted differently by teachers in different societies. In particular, we highlight the influence of (i) regulative; (ii) normative; (iii) cultural-cognitive elements on practice. We conclude by pointing out the complex interplay between regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive elements that both enable and constrain HPE teachers' enactments of social justice in HPE practice.

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  • 25.
    Linnér, Susanne
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Challenging the doxa of PETE - mission impossible?2014In: International Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) and New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE), AARE/NZARE, Brisbane 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Linnér, Susanne
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Yrkesetik i idrott och hälsa2018In: Läraren och yrkesetiken / [ed] Sara Irisdotter Alvenmyr, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 125-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Linnér, Susanne
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Några nedslag på AARE-NZARE 20142015In: Idrottsforskaren, no 1, p. 12-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lundin, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Lund University, Sweden.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Tolkningsutrymme och undervisningspraktiska konsekvenser: En språklig analys av ämnesplaner för ämnet Idrott och hälsa2021In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no June 11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Lundin, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Lund University, Sweden.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Subject-specific literacy in Physical Education and Health - the case of Sweden2022In: Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, ISSN 2574-2981, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 62-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this paper is to introduce a new way of analysing and understanding the framing and potential of Physical Education and Health (PEH) practice. Focusing on subject-specific literacy, which is defined as an abstract and generalising language, containing words and concepts typical for a specific subject [Nestlog, B. E. (2019). amnessprak - en fraga om innehall, roster och strukturer i amnestexter [subject-specific literacy - a question about content, voices and structures in subject specific texts]. HumaNetten Nr, 42, 9-30], we, in this paper, particularly stress and reiterate the need for a verbalised subject-specific literacy of PEH [Larsson, H., & Nyberg, G. (2017). 'It doesn't matter how they move really, as long as they move.' Physical education teachers on developing their students' movement capabilities. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 22(2), 137-149; Wright, J. (2000). Bodies, meanings and movement: A comparison of the language of a physical education lesson and a feldenkrais movement class. Sport, Education and Society, 5(1), 35-49]. Since the subject-specific literacy of a subject constitutes a framework for the subject regarding content, pedagogy and assessment, we argue that linguistic analysis is crucial when it comes to better our understanding of PEH practice. Drawing on a linguistic analysis framework, the four most common textbooks used in Swedish PEH practice are analysed. The analysis of the PEH textbooks involves: defining the characteristics of the core concepts, identifying the semantic relations between the concepts, creating hierarchical systems of concepts and exploring what appears as the core content of the PEH subject. The results highlight how explicit ways of talking about all areas of the PEH curriculum are missing [Wright, 2000]. In particular, the results show that concepts primarily relating to 'sports' dominate in comparison to 'health', and that health content is permeated by a biomedical perspective, which is mirrored in the subject-specific literacy related to it. In addition, the concepts related to sports are specific, often physically palpable and denote dynamic activities, such as interval training, reps [repetitions], sets, HRmax, and static strength, whereas concepts related to health are instead abstract and static.

  • 30.
    Lundin, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Lund University, Sweden.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Ämnesspråk i skolämnet Idrott och hälsa – en analys av begrepp och begreppsrelationer2022In: Språklig mångfald: Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Göteborg, 23-24 april 2020 / [ed] Stina Ericsson;Inga-Lill Grahn;Susanna Karlsson, ASLA , 2022, p. 110-130Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Flera idrottsforskare understryker språkets roll i undervisning i skolämnet Idrott och hälsa (Larsson & Karlefors, 2015; Nyberg & Larsson, 2014; Schenker et al., 2019), och ämnesspråket har påståtts vara svagt inte minst i de delar som hör samman med hälsa (Redelius et al., 2009; Schenker, 2018). I denna artikel presenteras resultaten av en pilotstudie av ämnesspråket i skolämnet Idrott och hälsa som det framställs i fyra läromedel. Vi har genomfört en semantisk analys (Holm, 2018; Saeed, 2014; Zimmermann & Sternefeld, 2013) av centrala begrepp i läromedlen och kompletterat denna med en terminologisk analys (Nuopponen & Pilke, 2016) för att identifiera såväl semantiska nätverk som begreppshierarkier som hör samman med idrott- respektive hälsa-delen av ämnet. Resultaten av vår undersökning visar att ämnesspråket i ämnet generellt är svagt men framför allt att det är svagare för hälsa-delen än idrott-delen; de begrepp som hör samman med idrott är mer specifika, konkreta och grafiskt längre än de som hör samman med hälsa och hör tydligare samman med varandra i semantiska nätverk. Därtill är de begrepp som hör samman med idrott i större utsträckning underbegrepp (hyponymer), medan de begrepp som hör samman med hälsa i större utsträckning är överbegrepp (hyperonymer). Resultatet är viktigt eftersom bristen på ett för ämnet gemensamt och starkt ämnesspråk dels gör bedömningen av elevernas prestationer i Idrott och hälsa osäker och subjektiv, dels ger upphov till stor variation i innehållet i ämnet. Resultaten kan utgöra en vetenskaplig grund för diskussioner om konsekvenser och didaktiska implikationer av förekomst och användning av ämnesspråk eller icke-ämnesspråk i ämnet.  

  • 31.
    Lundin, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Utveckla kunskaper eller bidra till rörelseglädje - en komparativ studie av kursplaner i Idrott och hälsa i fem olika län2022In: Idrott och språk – Språk i idrott: Nordisk nätverkskonferens vid Linnéuniversitetet  den 12–13 januari 2022 / [ed] Lundin, K., Linnéuniversitetet , 2022, p. 83-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Moen, Kjersti Mordal
    et al.
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Smith, Wayne
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Philpot, Rod
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Caring teaching and the complexity of building good relationships as pedagogies for social justice in health and physical education2020In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1015-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Health and Physical Education (HPE) profession has increasingly advocated for caring teacher-student relationships. In this paper, we draw on data from an international research project called 'EDUHEALTH' [Education for Equitable Health Outcomes - The Promise of School Health and Physical Education] to explore caring teaching and the complexity of building good relationships as pedagogies for social justice in HPE. The data reported on in this paper were generated through 20 HPE lesson observations and interviews with 13 HPE teachers across schools in Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. In our analysis of the data, we employed Nel Noddings 'Care Theory' [(1984. Caring, a feminine approach to ethics & moral education. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press; 1997). Pedagogisk filosofi [Philosophy of education]. Oslo: Ad Notam Gyldendal] to study the constitution of relationships and caring teaching in HPE practice. The findings demonstrate that caring teaching is inevitably built on developing good relationships, and that developing such good relationships is a complex process influenced by three key elements. First, teachers have to develop knowledge about their students on a societal, group and personal level; second, teachers have to reflect on the individual, environmental and relational aspects required for building good relationships; and third, teachers have to implement caring teaching strategies, such as planning, caring actions and doing 'the little things'. Drawing on Nodding's care theory, we conclude that pedagogies for social justice are enacted when teachers use their own knowledge and knowledge about the students, together with reflection and caring teaching strategies, to arrange a learning environment that promotes inclusion and equitable outcomes for all students.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Peterson, Tomas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden;Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    A definition of Sport and Social Entrepreneurship2018In: Sport and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 41-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Peterson, Tomas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden;Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Introduction2018In: Sport and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden / [ed] Tomas Peterson & Katarina Schenker, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 1-7Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Peterson, Tomas
    et al.
    Malmö university.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    KIOSK – Idrott och socialt entreprenörskap2015Book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Peterson, Tomas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Social entrepreneurship in a sport policy context2018In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 452-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates social entrepreneurship in relation to government state policies in Sweden and to the Swedish sports movement. Social entrepreneurship within sport comprises three elements that need to be qualified: the social element, entrepreneurship and sport. We wish to offer both a specific and a wider definition of social entrepreneurship in sport; specific in the sense that we try to define the concept theoretically, and wider in that we place the concept in a societal context where we relate it to different sectors in society. The method can be described as ethnographically inspired case studies. Four cases are presented. Previous research and the cases have helped us to formulate theses concerning sport' and profit' as means for social entrepreneurship, social' being normatively defined in the public sector, and entrepreneurial activities being understood as acts, crossing boundaries between the different sectors of society, leading to conflicts.

  • 37.
    Peterson, Tomas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden;Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schenker, KatarinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Sport and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited collection explores the concept of social entrepreneurship in sport, examining how it has been used in Swedish society to date. It explores how this approach in sport could also be used to address wider socio-political issues, including economic, political, cultural and pedagogical in European society.

    Sport and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden explores different social entrepreneurship projects which have created new forms of activity and reached groups of children and young people previously disengaged in sport. The authors also highlight the growing momentum of this kind of entrepreneurship in Sweden after a period of societal upheaval that has resulted in a blurring of social borders and the founding of new organisational forms.

    This book contributes to the formation of a new field of research, involving theoretical and empirical work on the characteristics and possibilities of social entrepreneurship in relation to sport.

  • 38.
    Philpot, Rod
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Smith, Wayne
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Taking action for social justice in HPE classrooms through explicit critical pedagogies2021In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 662-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A focus on equity, democracy and social justice in HPE is pertinent in an era where there are growing concerns about the impact of neoliberal globalisation and precariousness of society (Kirk 2020). Although there is advocacy for teaching approaches in HPE that address issues of social justice, there is limited empirical research of teachers enacting critical pedagogies in HPE classrooms.

    Purpose: To identify school HPE teaching practices that promote social justice through practical enactment across three different participating countries.

    Participants and Setting: The investigation involved classroom observations of and post-lesson interviews with 13 purposively selected high school health and physical education teachers from three different countries. A total of 20 HPE lessons were observed. The participants included seven male and six female teachers ranging in age from 25 to 55 years with between 3- and 25-years teaching experience. The setting for data collection was compulsory co-educational practical HPE classes with 13-15-year-old students in four schools in New Zealand, four schools in Sweden and three schools in Norway.

    Data Collection and Analysis: This study employed Critical Incident Technique (CIT) methodology (Flanagan 1954), involving data collection through exploratory observations and stimulated-recall interviews (Lyle 2003). The classroom observations focused on identifying incidents that appeared to be addressing issues of social justice. The use of a multi-national observer team was a key principle of the study and was based on the proposition that local researchers familiar with context come with taken-for-granted assumptions about teachers' practices. Data were analysed through a six-phase thematic analysis approach (Braun and Clarke 2013). This involved three stages: individually, collectively by the researchers in each country, and finally through the whole multi-national research team.

    Findings: The data analysis resulted in three primary themes; (1) relationships, (2) teaching for social cohesion, and (3) explicitly teaching about and acting on social inequities. This paper uses critical pedagogy as a lens to report on the third theme. In this paper, we present three subthemes; (1) Teaching as 'equity not equality', (2) promoting marginalised groups (3) and teacher critical reflection as examples of explicit critical pedagogies taking action for social justice in HPE.

    Conclusions/Implications: Although, the findings presented in this paper are examples of explicit teacher actions that aim to address social inequity, we suggest that teaching for social justice requires teachers to take action on social inequities and also to teach about social injustice to prepare students to become agents for change and act on social inequities themselves, beyond HPE.

  • 39.
    Philpot, Rod
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Smith, Wayne
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Sustainable Health.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Linnaeus Knowledge Environments, Education in Change.
    Moen, Kjersti Mordal
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Exploring social justice pedagogies in health and physical education through Critical Incident Technique methodology2021In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, no 1, p. 57-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe and reflect on the Critical Incident Technique (CIT) methodology used to explore how secondary school health and physical education (HPE) teachers address social justice in their teaching practice. The paper is informed by data generated as part of an ongoing three-year international research project involving eight physical education teacher education (PETE) researchers from three different countries. One of the general aims of the project was to develop teaching strategies to assist HPE teachers to refine and develop their practices so that they may become more inclusive and engaging for all students, thus helping contribute to more equitable educational outcomes. The specific aim of this paper is twofold: to describe the methodological framework of the research project and, secondly, to reflect on the challenges encountered in the research process along with the limitations and further potential of this research approach. We argue that the use of CIT methodology has allowed us to document rich descriptions of examples of teaching for social justice and to identify teacher practices that resonate with critical perspectives, or what we have come to call 'social justice pedagogies'. We conclude by asserting that our use of CIT methodology in this project serves as a political quest to reaffirm the social justice agenda in HPE practice through providing teachers with examples of social justice pedagogies. It is not an attempt to espouse a one-size-fits-all social justice model for HPE since social justice teaching strategies are enabled and constrained by the contexts in which they are practised.

  • 40.
    Redelius, Karin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Standal, Øyvind
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Mordal Moen, Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Westlie, Knut
    Inland Norway University of applied Sciences, Norway.
    Smith, Wayne
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Philpot, Rod
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Legge, Maureen
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    EDUHEALTH - Educating for equitable health outcomes in physical education.: Sweden, Norway and New Zealand in a Horizon 2020 project. (Symposium)2017In: Presented at ECER 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Apropå könsuppdelad undervisning2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Barnrättsperspektivet en balansgång mellan att lyssna till barnet och sätta gränser2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Debattinlägg: Vart tog barnen vägen?2012In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 52-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Delrapport (preliminär), resultat och analys, CIF-projekt 20132013Report (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Den didaktiska reflektionen och examensarbetet2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    ”Det är hatet som är obehagligt”2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    ”Education is the genetics of society”2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    En feministisk didaktisk reflektion2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    En Gothia cup-betraktelse2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    En idrottsförälders dilemman2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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