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  • 1.
    Hirvi, Laura
    et al.
    University of Helsinki.
    Jacobsen, Knut A.
    University of Bergen.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Young Sikhs in the Nordic countries: negotiating identities, traditions and authorities2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This session aims to investigate the processes and strategies by which second generation Sikhs of Punjabi and Punjabi-Nordic families are socialized and gravitate towards religious identifications in attempts to carve out a place for themselves in the Nordic countries. The Sikh migration to Northern Europe began in the 1960s and today there are around 14,000 Sikhs in the five Nordic countries. The first generation migrants have displayed self-conscious reflections on religious identity and have invested considerable efforts in maintaining cultural, religious and linguistic traditions by establishing religious institutions, often with the explicit purpose of transmitting cultural as well as religious customs to their children. The second generation Sikhs are legal citizens and at present in the process of pursuing educational careers and entering the labour market. Their identities are at once local and global as they are embedded in a web of transnational networks and identifications.

    Based on fieldworks conducted in Finland, Norway and Sweden the session explores how the second generation shapes understanding of individual and collective identities in relation to many different “cultural others” in the social fields of home, religious community and on the Internet.

    The context of home is usually seen as one of the primary sites where children are made familiar with the cultural and religious traditions of their parents, but it is also an arena where people challenge, re-create and negotiate those very traditions through the practices that they perform in the context of everyday life. Dr. Laura Hirvi will highlight the role that various family members play in this particular process by focusing on the experiences of young Sikhs who have been growing up in Finland.

    The Nordic Sikhs have successfully mobilized migrants in institutions based on religious belonging. Their public gurdwaras, which are currently eight in the Nordic countries, have become important “comfort zones” where collective identities and traditions are maintained and transmitted to the younger generation, primarily through the enactment of religious practices. Prof. Knut A. Jacobsen will discuss how the gurdwaras in Norway are often perceived as “little Punjabs” and as attempts of the parents to recreate the culture of the past and heal the wounds of loss. The challenges of forming young Sikh identities in the Diaspora will be analyzed by examining organizations affiliated to the gurdwaras, such as “Unge Sikher” (Young Sikhs) and the Punjabi schools for the youth.

    The Internet has provided diaspora communities possibilities to represent tradition and mobilize communal action on local and global levels. In the Nordic countries, the second generation Sikhs has established websites and discussion forums that function as cultural translators between the local communities and the majority society and have become important meeting places for interacting with co-devotees and interpreting and negotiating religious identifications. Dr. Kristina Myrvold will discuss how young Sikhs in Sweden engage in online and offline practices for the purpose of creating new collective representations, negotiating interpretations of religion and culture, and challenging traditional authorities.

  • 2.
    Jacobsen, Knut A.
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Aktor, Mikael
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Material objects of worship in the lived religions of South Asia2014In: Objects of worship in South Asian religions: forms, practices and meanings / [ed] Knut A. Jacobsen, Mikael Aktor and Kristina Myrvold, New York: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Jacobsen, Knut A.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Mann, Gurinder SinghGlobal Institute for Sikh Studies New York Inc., USA.Myrvold, KristinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.Nesbitt, EleanorUniversity of Warwick, UK.
    Brill's Encyclopedia of Sikhism, Volume 1: History, Literature, Society, Beyond Punjab2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sikhism is one of the most important religious traditions of South Asian origin.Sikhs are historically connected to the Punjab region in South Asia, but their religious traditions are transnational and have a worldwide presence. The study of their history and traditions has become a significant field of scholarship and research, but no academic, authoritative, and up-to-date reference work exists. Brill’s Encyclopedia of Sikhism aims to make available in-depth critical scholarship on all the main aspects of the Sikh traditions in a number of original essays written by the world's foremost scholars on Sikhs and Sikh traditions.

    The encyclopedia is thematic and seeks to present a balanced and impartial view of the Sikh traditions in all their multiplicity and as both historical and contemporary institutions. The articles, published in two volumes, focus on history, literature, and the rich social landscape of the Sikh community; their practices, places, arts, and performances; specialists and leadership; migration both within South Asia and beyond; and contemporary issues and relations.

  • 4.
    Jacobsen, Knut A.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Introduction2018In: Religion and Technology in India: Spaces, Practices, and Authorities / [ed] Knut A. Jacobsen, Kristina Myrvold, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-7Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Jacobsen, Knut A.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Introduction: Young Sikhs in a Global World2015In: Young Sikhs in a Global World: Negotiating Traditions, Identities and Authorities / [ed] Knut A. Jacobsen, Kristina Myrvold, Farnham: Ashgate, 2015, 1, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Jacobsen, Knut A.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Myrvold, KristinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Religion and Technology in India: Spaces, Practices and Authorities2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Religion tends to flourish when technological developments create new possibilities for communication and representation, and simultaneously change as a consequence of these developments.

    This book explores intersections between religion and technology in India, at the present and in the colonial past, and how various forms of techno-religious intersections transform and open up for new religious practices, discourses, communities, and institutions. With focus on Indian contexts and religions, it discusses various empirical and theoretical aspects of how technological innovations create, alter, and negotiate religious spaces, practices and authorities. The book provides rich and multifaceted empirical examples of different ways in which technological practices relate to meanings, ideas, and practices of religions. The techno-religious intersections generate several questions about authority and power, the politics and poetics of identity, community and place, and how religious agency, information, and experience are mediated, commodified, and adjusted to new demands of societies. The chapters explore the Hindu, Jain, and Sikh traditions in relation to new technological developments and media, such as photography, new means of visualization, TV serials, mobile phones, and online communication.

    The book will be of interest to academics studying modern and contemporary India and South Asia, and especially the role of religion and technology.

  • 7.
    Jacobsen, Knut A.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Myrvold, KristinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Young Sikhs in a Global World: Negotiating Traditions, Identities and Authorities2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In attempting to carve out a place for themselves in local and global contexts, young Sikhs mobilize efforts to construct, choose, and emphasize different aspects of religious and cultural identification depending on their social setting and context. Presenting current research on young Sikhs with multicultural and transnational life-styles and how they interpret, shape and negotiate religious identities, traditions, and authority on an individual and collective level, Young Sikhs in a Global World is the first volume of its kind devoted to the religion of young Sikhs in the global community.

    With a particular focus on the experiences of second generation Sikhs as they interact with various people in different social fields and cultural contexts, the book is constructed around three parts: “family and home”, “public display and gender”, and “reflexivity and translations”. New scholarly voices and established academics present qualitative research and ethnographic fieldwork and analyse how young Sikhs try to solve social, intellectual and psychological tensions between the family and the expectations of the majority society, between Punjabi culture and religious values.

  • 8.
    Jodhka, Surinder S.
    et al.
    Jawaharlal Nehru University .
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Sikhism and its changing social structure2014In: Routledge handbook of religions in Asia / [ed] Bryan S. Turner and Oscar Salemink, London: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 63-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Knut A., Jacobsen
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Aktor, MikaelUniversity of Southern Denmark.Myrvold, KristinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Objects of worship in South Asian religions: forms, practices and meanings2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objects of worship are an aspect of the material dimension of lived religion in South Asia. The omnipresence of these objects and their use is a theme which cuts across the religious traditions in the pluralistic religious culture of the region. Divine power becomes manifest in the objects and for the devotees they may represent power regardless of religious identity.

    This book looks at how objects of worship dominate the religious landscape of South Asia, and in what ways they are of significance not just from religious perspectives but also for the social life of the region. The contributions to the book show how these objects are shaped by traditions of religious aesthetics and have become conceptual devices woven into webs of religious and social meaning. They demonstrate how the objects have a social relationship with those who use them, sometimes even treated as being alive. The book discusses how devotees relate to such objects in a number of ways, and even if the objects belong to various traditions they may attract people from different communities and can also be contested in various ways.

    By analysing the specific qualities that make objects eligible for a status and identity as living objects of worship, the book contributes to an understanding of the central significance of these objects in the religious and social life of South Asia. It will be of interest to students and scholars of Religious Studies and South Asian Religion, Culture and Society.

  • 10.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universiitet.
    Bibi Jagir Kaur bryter manlig dominans inom sikhismen1999In: Sydasien, ISSN 0282-0463, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 24-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    De blåklädda helgonkrigarna: sikhiska traditionsbärare i moderniseringsprocess2004In: RIT: Religionsvetenskaplig Internet Tidskrift, Vol. 7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Dera Sacha Sauda: oroligheter i Indien när religiös ledare döms för våldtäkt2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Drinking the Guru’s Transformative Words: Uses of Amrit in Sikh Religious Practices2015In: IAHR World Congress, August 23-29, Erfurt, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sikh religious traditions there are various practices of using amrit, that is, sweetened water that has been consecrated by recitations of compositions from the scripture Guru Granth. Usually the term refers to the blessed nectar-water given to neophytes during the initiation ceremony of Khalsa, when a person adopts a normative Sikh identity. However, in living practices it also implies a whole range of consecrated waters that are attributed transformative powers. This paper examines how different types of amrit are believed to produce various effects on people, depending upon textual and contextual factors during the process of transforming ordinary water to nectar, including the identity of the agent preparing amrit, ritual spaces and instruments, and dispositions among recipients. The transformative powers ascribed to particular waters are intimately connected with semantic properties of the recited scriptural hymns or what these hymns have come to represent in the broader Sikh tradition.

  • 14.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Eco Ganesha: miljömedvetande och förändrade hinduiska högtider i Indien2013In: Sydasien, no novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Engaging with the Guru: Contemporary Beliefs and Practices of Guru Granth Sahib2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Engaging with the Guru: Sikh Beliefs and Practices of Guru Granth Sahib2013In: Iconic Books and Texts / [ed] James W. Watts, Equinox Publishing, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Engaging with the Guru: Sikh Beliefs and Practices of Guru Granth Sahib2010In: Postscripts, ISSN 1743-887X, E-ISSN 1743-8888, Vol. 6, no 1-3, p. 201-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sikhs have perhaps taken the concept of a sacred scripture much further than any other religious community by treating the Guru Granth Sahib as a living guru. This essay analyzes various religious beliefs and practices by which contemporary Sikhs construct and maintain conceptions of their scripture as a guru with spiritual authority. A distinction is made between religious practices that serve to mediate and interpret the semantic content of the scripture, performative acts that are enacted to transform the social world, and rituals that aim to give the scripture a careful ministration and celebrate different stages of its worldly life. The various ritualized uses of Guru Granth Sahib can be approached as external strategies by which the Sikhs personify their scripture and make it socially alive as a living guru.

  • 18.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Entextualization of Sikh texts in religious historiographies and performances2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary Sikh historiographies present the creation of the Sikh scripture (Guru Granth Sahib) as an evolving process of entextualization with different strategies to make the gurus speeches fixed, recognizable and authoritative, but also how contemporary ritual performances of the text and ritual exegeses reinforce the entextualized character of the scripture in different ways, e.g. by ritual performance markers, upholding boundaries between authors and users, creating indexical links to presupposed contexts of “authentic” prior performances in history, etc. In this context it is also interesting that such processes can be actively challenged, as in the case of the “tenth scripture” (Dasam Granth) whose authenticity and authorship is still creating heated debates among the Sikhs.

  • 19.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Forskningsbaserat lärande: Reflektioner kring undervisning och examination2015In: Religionsdidaktiska studier / [ed] Torsten Löfstedt, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2015, p. 51-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Genus och Yoga i nyandlig vridning: Kvinnliga röster från Yogi Bhajans sikhism2004In: Chakra : tidskrift för indiska religioner, ISSN 1652-0203, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 126-131Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Growing Academic Interest in European Sikhs2010In: The Sikh FoundationArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Guds namn går att låna på banken i Varanasi2002In: Sydasien, ISSN 0282-0463, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Guru Granth: Ceremonial Treatment2017In: Brill's Encyclopedia of Sikhism, Volume 1: History, Literature, Society, Beyond Punjab / [ed] Knut A. Jacobsen, Gurinder Singh Mann, Kristina Myrvold, Eleanor Nesbitt, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hindu Soldiers in Europe during the First World War: Religious Books, Symbols, and Practices2018In: Handbook of Hinduism in Europe / [ed] Knut A. Jacobsen and Ferdinando Sardella, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Hymner från Guru Granth i norsk översättning: vägledning till kunskap om sikhisk religiös utövning2005In: Chakra : tidskrift för indiska religioner, ISSN 1652-0203, Vol. 4, p. 77-84Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    I guruns fotspår: pilgrimsresor och platser i samtida sikhism2009In: Heliga platser, pilgrimsfärder och andliga resor i vår samtid / [ed] Bodil Liljefors Persson och Emma Hall, Föreningen lärare i religionskunskap , 2009, p. 31-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    I’m a Punjabi Speaking Swedish Sikh2015In: The Punjabi Diaspora's Linkages to Host Societies, Punjabi University, Patiala, India, January 20-22, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Inside the Guru's Gate: Ritual Uses of Texts among the Sikhs in Varanasi2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For religious Sikhs, the Guru Granth Sahib is a holy scripture which enshrines ontologically divine words and the teaching and revelatory experiences of historical human Gurus. Simultaneously the Sikhs have taken the concept of a sacred scripture much further than any other religious community by treating the Guru Granth Sahib as a living Guru invested with spiritual authority and agency to guide humans and establish relationships to the divine. Wherever the Sikhs have settled in the world today the scripture is staged at the center of their congregational life. The Sikh place of worship - a gurdwara or the Guru's gate - is by definition a space in which Guru Granth Sahib is made present to run a daily court. The scripture is installed daily on an elevated throne like a royal sovereign who/which admits worshippers and at nightfall ceremonially taken to a special bedroom for rest. In religious services the Sikhs daily recite and sing hymns of the scripture and explore its semantic inner for guidance in their social life.Considering the significations of Guru Granth Sahib, as a living Guru of the Sikhs, it is surprising that scholars have paid considerably little attention to religious attitudes, behaviors and acts surrounding the physical scripture and the living performance traditions of orally rendering and exploring its content. "Inside the Guru's Gate: Ritual Uses of Texts among the Sikhs in Varanasi" aims to direct the focus towards a deeper understanding of contemporary religious worship and oral performance traditions in Sikhism. Based on field work in a Sikh congregation at Varanasi (Northern India), the study investigates how local Sikhs perceive, use and interact with the Guru Granth Sahib and other religious texts accredited gurbani status, i.e. words being uttered by their human Gurus, through a wide spectrum of practices.From the perspective of ritual and anthropological theories, the study analyzes the discursive and ritual means by which local Sikhs create and confirm conceptions of the Guru's presence and agency in the world. Local discourses on the Guru Granth Sahib situate the scripture in a web of relationships - onto-theological relationships to the invisible divine, historical relationships to the human Gurus, and social relationships to contemporary disciples - that legitimize both its worldly and otherworldly identity and power. By arranging spaces and enacting ritual acts in the gurdwara, the Sikhs enmesh the Guru Granth Sahib in daily routines and stage the scripture as a worldly sovereign with capacity to provide spiritual guidance, transmit the divine revelation it enshrines, and make it possible for devotees to gain spiritual knowledge and experiences. Since Guru Granth Sahib belongs to a succession line of human Gurus it has inherited anthropomorphic habits and even has its own life-cycle rituals that mark important events and stages in the worldly life of the text. The study argues that ritual uses of the Guru Granth Sahib and the living performance traditions of mediating the scriptural words are the means by which the Sikhs personify and bring the scripture to life, as an agentive Guru, and make its teaching perpetually alive and relevant to changing contexts in a human and socially conditioned world. To develop and sustain a devotional and didactical relationship, even a social relationship, to the scripture is what makes people Sikhs - disciples of the Guru.

  • 29.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Introduction2010In: The Death of Sacred Texts: Ritual Disposal and Renovation of Texts in the World Religions / [ed] Kristina Myrvold, Ashgate, 2010, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Making Pilgrimage Places of the Gurus in Varanasi: Countering Hindu Narratives in Local Sikh Historiography2012In: South Asian History and Culture, ISSN 1947-2498, E-ISSN 1947-2501, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 97-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sikhs in Varanasi constitute a small minority situated within the boundaries of a Hindu-dominated culture. Most of the families now residing arrived in the years surrounding the partition in 1947 as migrants and traders from West Punjab, and only a few have a previous history in the city. In attempts to create meaningful representations of a shared past and visibility in the Hindu pilgrimage centre, the new-comers constructed their own collective history centring on the Sikh gurus' visits to and wonders in Varanasi. This article first examines how images of Varanasi and its inhabitants unfold in the historical writings of the Sikh gurus and the hagiographical literature (janam-sakhis) that aimed at proving the spiritual supremacy of the first guru, Guru Nanak. It continues to describe and analyse how the written history constructed by contemporary Sikhs in Varanasi manifests itself as a ‘counter-narrative’ in relation to a dominant discourse of the city as being a centre of Hindu pilgrimage and religious learning. The narrative structure of this modern history is set and framed by selected stereotypical images of Varanasi, but instead of verifying Hindu values and authority it creates an alternative paradigm that eventually confirms the spiritual superiority of the Sikh gurus and their teaching. Constructed as a counter-narrative, the local historiography provides contemporary Sikhs a possibility to make claims on the visibility, the identity and the right to occupy a space within the sacred geography of Varanasi and negotiate ‘an other’ representation of the collective self from within the dominant cultural discourse.

  • 31.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Making the Book a Living Guru: Ritual Practices among Contemporary Sikhs2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Making the Scripture a Person: Re-inventing Death Rituals of Guru Granth Sahib in Sikhism2010In: The Death of Sacred Texts: Ritual Disposal and Renovation of Texts in the World Religions / [ed] Kristina Myrvold, Ashgate, 2010, p. 125-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Med Guruns ord mot demoner: Vadbhag Singh i en sikhisk healingtradition2004In: Chakra - tidskrift för indiska religioner, ISSN 1652-0203, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 98-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Miniature Scriptures for Muslim and Sikh Soldiers in the British Army during World War I2016In: Miniature Book Society Newsletter, no 101, p. 15-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Möte med Namdhari-sikhernas andliga överhuvud SatGuru Jagjit Singh ji1999In: Sydasien nätupplaga, ISSN 0282-0463, Vol. 23, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Nām Simran in the Sikh religion2016In: Asian Traditions of Meditation / [ed] Halvor Eifring, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2016, p. 103-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    "Orientalizing" Bibles in Punjab: Christian Missionaries and Book Printing in Nineteenth Century India2017In: India: Research on Cultural Encounters and Representations at Linnaeus University / [ed] Kristina Myrvold, Soniya Billore, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2017, p. 100-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Osjälvisk tjänst av sikherna2005In: Chakra : tidskrift för indiska religioner, ISSN 1652-0203, Vol. 3, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Personifying the Sikh Scripture: Ritual Processions of the Guru Granth Sahib in India2008In: South Asian Religions on Display: Religious Processions in South Asia and in the Diaspora / [ed] Knut Axel Jacobsen, Routledge, 2008, p. 140-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Physiological Engagements with a Scriptural Guru: Ritualized Transactions between the Sikhs and Guru Granth Sahib2016In: "Seeing, Touching, Holding and Tasting Sacred Texts" at Ruhr University Bochum, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Pocketbiblar som räddade soldaters liv i skyttegravar2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Print Culture in Colonial Punjab2018In: Brill's Encyclopedia of Sikhism, Vol. II / [ed] Knut A. Jacobsen, Gurinder S. Mann, Kristina Myrvold, Eleanor Nesbitt, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Punjabi across Generations: Language Affiliation and Acquisition among Young Swedish Sikhs2015In: Young Sikhs in a Global World: Negotiating Traditions, Identities and Authorities / [ed] Knut A. Jacobsen, Kristina Myrvold, Farnham: Ashgate, 2015, 1, p. 71-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Religion in the trenches: miniature scriptures for Sikh soldiers in the British army during World War I2014In: / [ed] Gurinder Singh Mann, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Religiös praktik för sikhiska skrifter i brittiskt arkiv2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Remembering the Divine Name: Religious Perceptions and Practices of Nam Simran in the Sikh Religion2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Sikher hjälteförklarar den amerikanska polisen2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Sikher och sikhism: med gurun installerad på en tron och svenska poliser i turban2009In: Det mångreligiösa Sverige: ett landskap i förändring / [ed] Daniel Andersson och Åke Sander, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 2, p. 285-338Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Sikher och sikhism: religiöst liv, representation och traditionsförmedling2015In: Det mångreligiösa Sverige: ett landskap i förändring / [ed] Daniel Andersson och Åke Sander, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 3, p. 263-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Myrvold, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Sikher och sikhism: religiöst liv, representation och traditionsförmedling2005In: Det mångreligiösa Sverige: ett landskap i förändring / [ed] Daniel Andersson och Åke Sander, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2005, p. 263-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
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