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  • 1. Adolfsson, Peter
    et al.
    Roos, Harald
    Lunds universitet.
    Östenberg, Anna
    Lunds universitet.
    Speciella aspekter på damfotboll1998In: Fotbollsmedicin, Solna: Svenska fotbollförbundet , 1998, 1, p. 435-450Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alricsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Björklund, G.
    Swedish Sports Confederat, Stockholm ; Mid Sweden University.
    Ekström, A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Introducing Tabata intervals and stability exercises in school children by a school-based study2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, p. 417-417Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bele, Sofie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Sjöström, Rita
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mittuniversitetet.
    Experiences of returning to elite beach volleyball after shoulder injury2015In: Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 204-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine beach volleyball players' experience regarding shoulder injury and how it affects their return to play. To achieve the research aims a qualitative design with semi-structured interviews had been conducted, five elite beach volleyball players, four men and one woman aged 27-42 participated in the study. All participants had suffered a severe shoulder injury, with absence from training and competing for at least 28 days. The findings of this study indicate that it is the individual's inner motivation, together with a clear goal and support from the community, family, teammate and coach that are the most important factors when going through rehabilitation and getting back to playing beach volleyball after a shoulder injury. All participants had been affected by their injury in some way; some of the participants had been affected in a positive way since they had become mentally stronger and had developed better volleyball technique after rehabilitation. The conclusions of this study indicate that there are three distinct factors that increase the chances of getting back to playing beach volleyball after shoulder injury; it is the players' self motivation, together with a clear goal and support from the community.

  • 4. Ekström, Annika
    et al.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Björklund, Glenn
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    The effects of introducing Tabata interval training and stability exercises to school children as a school-based intervention program2019In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1-11, article id 20170043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Physical activities during leisure time as well as school hours have changed over the past few years, with adolescents being less physically active and adopting a sedentary lifestyle. Objective The overall objective of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the feasibility of introducing a 4-min Tabata interval training into a lower secondary school context. A further aim was to evaluate the possible effects on: coordination, balance, and strength. Methods The study was conducted as an intervention study with a mixed-method approach. Forty-three children, aged 7-9 years, participated in the intervention group. Additionally, 13 children were recruited as a control group. The intervention itself was delivered by the teachers and was performed for 4-min every day in a classroom setting. All participants performed physical tests before and after the intervention period to evaluate the Tabata training. After the completion of the 6-week Tabata interval training, the four teachers were interviewed. Results The push-ups (p = 0.004), kneeling push-ups (p = 0.03), and standing long jump (p = 0.01) improved in the intervention group after 6 weeks. No differences were observed between the genders. The teachers experienced that it worked well to integrate the Tabata interval training in the classroom setting. Conclusion After 6 weeks, a school-based Tabata intervention program improved physical performance. The teachers saw no obstacles in including the Tabata intervention program in a classroom setting and pointed out several positive aspects such as an increased energy level and development in the children's movement patterns.

  • 5. Ericsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Knee laxity measurement in acute knee trauma and ACL evaluation with the Rolimeter.2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol 50, Issue 22, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Ericsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Andersson, Erik
    Mid Sweden University.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Test-retest reliability of repeated knee laxity measurements in the acute phase following a knee trauma using a Rolimeter2017In: Journal of exercise rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 550-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to examine the test-retest reliability of the Rolimeter measurement procedure in the acute time phase, following a substantial knee trauma. In total, 15 participants with acute knee trauma were examined by one single observer at three different time-points with the Rolimeter using a maximum force. The selected time-points were: baseline (0–7 days after the trauma), midpoint (3–4 weeks after the trauma), and endpoint (3–4 weeks after the trauma). The anterior-posterior displacement was recorded where the endpoint evaluation was used as the reference value. The mean anterior laxity scores remained constant over the measurement time-points for both knees, with an anterior laxity that was 2.7 mm higher (on average) in the injured than the noninjured knee (9.5 mm vs. 6.8 mm). The mean difference (i.e., bias) between laxity scores, for the injured knee, measured at endpoint versus baseline was 0.2±1.0 mm and −0.2±1.1 mm when measured at endpoint versus midpoint, with average typical errors of 0.7 and 0.8 mm and intra-class correlations that were very strong (both r=~0.93). For the same comparisons on the noninjured knee, systematic bias was close to zero (0.1±0.3 and −0.1±0.3 mm, respectively), and both the intra-class correlations were almost perfect (r=~0.99). The current study implicates that repeated Rolimeter measurements are relatively reliable for quantifying anterior knee laxity during the acute time-phases following knee trauma. Hence, the Rolimeter, in combination with manual tests, seems to be a valuable tool for identifying anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

  • 7.
    Fahlström, Per Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Äpplet faller inte långt från trädet: Om idrottande barns föräldrar och deras betydelse för barnens idrottskarriär2013In: SVEBI Årskonferens, Stockholm, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Knee laxity measurement in acute knee trauma and ACL evaluation with the Rolimeter.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Frisk Bengtsson, Tina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Weslien, Elis
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Oklart om bäst i test ger mest2011In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 59-62Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I antagningen till ett riksidrottsgymnasium ingår fysiska tester. Vår analys av tester från gymnasiet i Växjö visar att de möjligen kan förutsäga idrottslig framgång som senior, men sambanden är så svaga att de inte bör vara helt avgörande vid antagningen.

  • 10.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Strömberg, Camilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Fahlström, Per Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Who are the parents?: A study of the parental background of children age 13-14 included in the first talent process steps in soccer and athletics in southern Sweden.2015In: 20th annual Congress of the European college of sport science 24th - 27th June 2015, Malmö – Sweden: Book of abstracts / [ed] Radman, Aage; Hedenborg, Susanna; Tsolakidis, Elias, European College of Sport Science , 2015, p. 236-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lohmander, L.S.
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Östenberg, Anna
    Lunds universitet.
    Englund, M.
    Lund University.
    Roos, H
    High prevalence of knee osteoarthritis, pain, and functional limitations in female soccer players twelve years after anterior cruciate ligament injury2004In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 3145-3152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) as well as knee-related symptoms and functional limitations in female soccer players 12 years after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury.

    METHODS: Female soccer players who sustained an ACL injury 12 years earlier were examined with standardized weight-bearing knee radiography and 2 self-administered patient questionnaires, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire and the Short Form 36-item health survey. Joint space narrowing and osteophytes were graded according to the radiographic atlas of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. The cutoff value to define radiographic knee OA approximated a Kellgren/Lawrence grade of 2.

    RESULTS: Of the available cohort of 103 female soccer players, 84 (82%) answered the questionnaires and 67 (65%) consented to undergo knee radiography. The mean age at assessment was 31 years (range 26-40 years) and mean body mass index was 23 kg/m2 (range 18-40 kg/m2). Fifty-five women (82%) had radiographic changes in their index knee, and 34 (51%) fulfilled the criterion for radiographic knee OA. Of the subjects answering the questionnaires, 63 (75%) reported having symptoms affecting their knee-related quality of life, and 28 (42%) were considered to have symptomatic radiographic knee OA. Slightly more than 60% of the players had undergone reconstructive surgery of the ACL. Using multivariate analyses, surgical reconstruction was found to have no significant influence on knee symptoms.

    CONCLUSION: A very high prevalence of radiographic knee OA, pain, and functional limitations was observed in young women who sustained an ACL tear during soccer play 12 years earlier. These findings constitute a strong rationale to direct increased efforts toward prevention and better treatment of knee injury.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Tania
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Injury profile among elite male youth soccer players in a Swedish first league2016In: Journal of exercise rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 83-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the injury profile among elite male youth soccer players in a Swedish first league during two seasons. The present cohort study is based on data collected during the 2013-2014 seasons. In total, 43 young elite male soccer players, aged 15 to 19 yr, were prospectively followed regarding injuries, time of exposure, injury location, type of injury, and injury severity. The overall incidence of injury in the present study was estimated to 6.8 injuries per 1,000 exposure hours and 15.5 and 5.6 injuries per 1,000 hr for matches and training, respectively. The single most common injury subtype was muscle strain (53%). The hip and groin were the most common locations for injuries. Thirty-one percent of the injuries were classified as severe injury and caused >28 days absence from training and match play. Both the injury incidence and the number of serious injury seems to be relatively high in youth elite players according to this study. Although the injury incidence seems to be slightly lower than in adult elite players the injuries seem to be more traumatic in youth elite players.

  • 13.
    Roos, E.M.
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Östenberg, Anna
    Lunds universitet.
    Roos, H.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ekdahl, C.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lohmander, L.S.
    Lunds universitet.
    Long-term outcome of meniscectomy: symptoms, function, and performance tests in patients with or without radiographic osteoarthritis compared to matched controls2001In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 316-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the long-term influence of meniscectomy on pain, functional limitations, and muscular performance. To assess the effects of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA), gender and age on these outcomes in patients with meniscectomy.

    DESIGN: 159 subjects (35 women), mean age 53 years, were examined 19 (17-22) years after open meniscectomy. Self-reported symptoms and function were assessed, performance tests were carried out and radiographs were taken. Sixty-eight age- and gender-matched controls were examined likewise. The data was analysed in two steps. First, subjects with meniscectomy were compared to the controls, and subgroup analyses were carried out with regard to radiographic OA, gender and age. Second, similar comparisons were carried out within the meniscectomized group.

    RESULTS: Meniscectomized subjects reported significantly (P< 0.001) more symptoms and functional limitations than did controls. This was also true when operated subjects without OA were compared to controls without OA. Within the meniscectomized group, severe radiographic OA (joint space narrowing grade 2 or more) and female gender, but not older age, was associated with more symptoms and functional limitations. Meniscectomy was associated with worse muscular performance. Female gender and older age were associated with worse muscular performance in the study group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Meniscectomy is associated with long-term symptoms and functional limitations, especially in women. Patients who had developed severe radiographic OA experienced more symptoms and functional limitations. Age did not influence self-reported outcomes, however older age was associated with worse muscular performance.

  • 14.
    Östenberg, Anna
    Lunds universitet.
    Physical performance, injuries and osteoarthrosis in female soccer2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose was to investigate female soccer regarding injuries, risk factors, posttraumatic OA and non-traumatic OA. A prospective study of injuries in eight female soccer teams, from the six available levels, was performed during one season. The total injury rate was 14.3 and 3.7/1000 game and practice hours, respectively. The knee (26%) was the most common place for injury, followed by the foot (12%). An increased general joint laxity was found to be a significant risk factor for general injury and knee injury. In an attempt to find easy functional tests that do not require advanced equipment and that could be used instead of more advanced isokinetic tests, only low correlations between isokinetic strength measurements and functional tests, such as one-leg hop, triple jump, vertical jump, one-leg rising or square hop, were found. There were no differences in any of the tests found between players under /over the age of 20, except for knee flexor muscle strength, where a small but significant difference was seen. Female soccer players with ACL injury showed radiographic changes in the in 69%, and verified knee OA in 34% at the age of 31, 12 years after injury. A majority of the players suffered from symptoms affecting their sport and recreational activities and knee-related quality of life. However, the symptoms were not related to the presence of OA or having undergone surgery to the affected knee or not. Somewhat older female ex-soccer players (mean age 42 years) showed a prevalence of 3% and 17% of radiographic hip and knee OA, and had, with and without knee injuries, a 5-fold increased rate of knee osteoarthrosis compared to non-sporting females age 46, when age and BMI were adjusted for. No difference was seen between the female players and the non-sporting controls regarding hip OA. Increased general joint laxity was found to be a risk factor for injury. Female soccer players with an ACL injury had verified knee OA in 34% at the age of 31, 12 years after injury. Also, somewhat older female players after their career showed a high prevalence of radiographic knee OA and a 5-fold risk of developing knee OA compared to controls. Female soccer by itself and in combination with the high risk of knee injuries has an increased risk of OA. However, the positive effects of exercise, physical and mental, when playing soccer should not be ignored.

  • 15.
    Östenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Roos, E
    Lunds universitet.
    Ekdahl, C
    Lunds universitet.
    Roos, H
    Lunds universitet.
    Isokinetic knee extensor strength and functional performance in healthy female soccer players1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to determine the relationship between isokinetic knee extensor muscle strength at 60 degrees/s and 180 degrees/s and five functional performance tests (one-leg-hop, triple-jump, vertical-jump, one-leg-rising and square-hop), to determine the relationship between the five different functional performance tests and to present normative data and limb symmetry index concerning healthy female soccer players. In total 101 female soccer players (X = 20.3 years) were tested. A limb symmetry index, using weak/strong leg, varied from 83.9 to 96.3 in the tests. Between the functional performance tests there were in general correlations of r = 0.4-0.8 (P < 0.001). A correlation of r = 0.77 (P < 0.001) was obtained between one-leg-hop and triple-jump. No differences were found between the right and the left leg or the dominant and the non-dominant leg. Using linear regression models corrected for body weight, height and age, there were low correlations between the isokinetic strength measurements and the functional tests. It is not recommended using functional performance testing and isokinetic testing interchangeably.

  • 16.
    Östenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Roos, Ewa M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ekdahl, Charlotte
    Lunds universitet.
    Roos, Harald P.
    Lunds universitet.
    Physical capacity in female soccer players: does age make a difference?2000In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increased risk of injuries, especially knee injuries, in young female soccer players. If age-related differences in physical capacity could be identified, the possibilities for injury prevention may increase. The objective was to study possible age-related differences in isokinetic muscle strength, aerobic capacity, functional performance, and general joint laxity in female soccer players. Body mass index (BMI) (kg × m-2) was also measured. In total 108 players, recruited from seven soccer teams, were tested. The mean age was 20.2 years (SD=4.1, range=14-30). Players aged ≦20 years and>20 years were compared. The following tests were employed: isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at velocities of 60 °/s and 180°/s, one-leg hop, triple jump, vertical jump, square-hop, and aerobic capacity. The older group had greater isokinetic strength for the flexor muscles at a peak torque of 60°/s (p=0.04), and total work at 60°/s and 180°/s (p=0.04 and 0.03). The older group had a higher BMI and more years of soccer playing (p≪0.001). The results revealed no significant differences between the age groups regarding, functional performance, aerobic capacity, or general joint laxity. Further studies are needed on intrinsic risk factors to identify variables explaining the difference in injury rate between younger and older players. 

  • 17.
    Östenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Roos, H
    Lunds universitet.
    Injury risk factors in female European football: a prospective study of 123 players during one season2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 279-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to register prospectively the injuries in female soccer and to study their correlation to potential risk factors. A total of 123 senior players from eight teams of different levels were followed during one season. Isokinetic knee muscle strength at 60 and 180 degrees/s, one-leg-hop, vertical jump, square-hop, and continuous multistage fitness test (MFT) were tested at the end of the pre-season. In addition, Body Mass Index (BMI) and general joint laxity were measured. During the season, April-October, all injuries resulting in absence from one practice/game or more were registered. Forty-seven of the 123 players sustained altogether 65 injuries. The total injury rate was 14.3 per 1000 game hours and 3.7 per 1000 practice hours. The knee (26%) was the most commonly injured region followed by the foot (12%), ankle (11%), thigh (11%) and back (11%). The risk of sustaining moderate and major injuries increased in the later part of the game or practice. Significant risk factors for injuries were an increased general joint laxity (odds ratio (OR)=5.3, P<0.001), a high performance in the functional test square-hop (OR=4.3, P=0.002), and an age over 25 years (OR=3.7, P=0.01). The injury rate was not different compared to male soccer, but knee injuries were more common, which is in accordance with previous studies. None of the risk factors identified in this study is easily applicable for future intervention studies in the attempts to reduce the injury rate in female soccer.

  • 18.
    Östenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Spector, T.D.
    Hart, D
    Sanfridsson, J
    Lindberg, H
    Åkeson, P
    Roos, H
    The prevalence of hip and knee osteoarthritis in female former soccer playersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 18 of 18
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