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  • 1.
    Bruhn, Jørgen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Löwe, CorinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.Lutas, LiviuLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.Rossholm, Anna SofiaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.Salmose, NiklasLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.Tornborg, EmmaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.Almgren White, Anette
    Ekfrase: Nordisk Tidsskrift for Visuell Kultur2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    A Method of Analyzing Emotional Experiences in Fiction2017In: Narrative and Experience – concept workshop: University of Tampere, Mon 18 Sep 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    A sudden beat of clock time2018In: Entre - Lieux, p. 62-63Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Art About Nostalgia or Nostalgic Art?2018In: Once Upon a Time: Nostalgic Narratives in Transition / [ed] Niklas Salmose, Eric Sandberg, Stockholm: Trolltrumma Academia , 2018, p. 127-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Can a Proletarian Writer Be a Modernist?: A Study of Swedish Proletarian Writers in a Modernist Context2016In: AMSN3: Modernist Work. University of New South Wales, Sydney. 29-31 March, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Efterord: Fitzgerald och nostalgi2014In: Alla sorgsna unga män / [ed] Niklas Salmose, Röstånga: Trolltrumma , 2014, p. 225-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Harry Hole: Jo Nesbø (1960–)2018In: 100 Greatest Literary Detectives / [ed] Eric Sandberg, London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2018, p. 88-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Introduction2018In: Once Upon a Time: Nostalgic Narratives in Transition / [ed] Niklas Salmose, Eric Sandberg, Stockholm: Trolltrumma Academia , 2018, p. 6-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Kaos i klassrummet: om filmval, känslor och att göra film till ett aktivt och inte passivt medium2017In: [ Presented at ] Upp till kamp! Inspirationsdag Skolbio i Jönköping, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Little Bright Eyes: A Contextual Case for ‘The Rich Boy’2015In: 13th International F. Scott Fitzgerald Conference, Dublin and Waterford, 4 - 11 juli, The F. Scott Fitzgerald Society , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fitzgerald wrote about his times in his times; it is difficult to imagine a more contextual author. Contemporary music, cinema, newspaper stories, social customs, just to name a few, are integrated in his writing.  Some of his intertexts are clearly visible, distinctly rooted in public imagination beyond particular moments of history. When John M. Chestnut mentions an “intellectual murder in Hoboken” (141) in “Rags Martin-Jones and the Pr-nce of W-les” (1924), it obviously refers to the Leopold and Loeb case that so famously flourished in the press around 1924 and occupied Fitzgerald’s mind for several years. The kidnapping and murder of Robert “Bobby” Franks was often headlined as an “intellectual murder” in media. There are other, much more obscure, intertexts though, and this paper will investigate one of them. In “The Rich Boy” (1926) the following occurs:

    The smoke banked like fog, and the opening of a door filled the room with blown swirls of ectoplasm. Little Bright Eyes streaked past the tables seeking Mr. Conan Doyle among the Englishmen who were posing as Englishmen about the lobby. (17)

    A modern reader might browse through this scene without really pondering the meaning of “Little Bright Eyes”, but a translator has no other choice than to investigate the matter. Who is “Little Bright Eyes”? There are several options at hand: a children’s book, Little Bright Eyes, published in 1898 by Helen Marion Burnside, a popular song from the late nineteenth century by Westendorf, a German doll from 1915, manufactured by Armand Marseille, reflecting the new image of a child’s cheerful and optimistic attitude, or the Omaha Native girl Susette La Flesche, known as “Bright Eyes”. Clearly any links between these meanings and Fitzgerald are absent as well as why any of these creations should streak past any tables at all. Perhaps the answer can be found in relation to another character om the passage, more celebrated and known – Conan Doyle? Conan Doyle has not written anything about “Little Bright Eyes”, but when one considers the scene’s “swirls of ectoplasm” one moves into the realm of the paranormal and Conan Doyle, besides sketching the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, was an avid fan of spiritualism and even wrote a book on the subject called The Coming of the Fairies (1922). Could “Little Bright Eyes” be related to the world of spiritualism, could it be a fairy? One of the more intriguing court cases in the Supreme Court in Brooklyn 1907 was that between Miss Minerva Vanderbilt and her father, the wealthy lumber merchant Edward Ward Vanderbilt. Minerva tried to prove her father insane in order to revoke a will to his second wife, a Mrs. Mary S. Pepper-Vanderbilt, famous spiritualist medium. The case involved several letters sent to Mr. Vanderbilt by his wife’s “spirit control”, known as “Little Bright Eyes”!

    This paper relates the intertext of the 1907 court case of “Little Bright Eyes” and Conan Doyle’s fascination of the fairies to the section of “The Rich Boy” in order to both understand Fitzgerald’s transtextual method as well as offering an enhanced reading of the passage. Additionally, the paper comments on the difficulties of translating Fitzgerald, in terms of his contextual literary strategies.

  • 11.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Martin Beck: Maj Sjöwall (1935–), Per Wahlöö (1926–1975)2018In: 100 Greatest Literary Detectives / [ed] Eric Sandberg, London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2018, p. 14-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    McKenzie Wark: Molecular Red : Theory for the Anthropocene2016In: Ekfrase: Nordisk Tidsskrift for Visuell Kultur, ISSN 1891-5752, E-ISSN 1891-5760, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 74-77Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Modernist Fiction and Sensorial Aesthetics2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viktor Shlovsky wrote almost hundred years ago that there is art that makes one “recover the sensation of life”. His famous remark “to make the stone stony” refers, in my mind, to the very concept of a sensorial aesthetic; objects should be described as they are sensed not as they are perceived. Modernist novels occupy an ambiguous space between being mono-medial and multi-modal, acting as both self-referencing works of art and, at the same time, evidently referring to and being inspired by other media such as cinematography and music. Studies of modernist fiction, and its relation to the sensorial modalities vision and sound, are numerous and convincing, especially in concordance with modernity and technology (Danius 2002; Jacobs 2001; Kern 1983; Kundu 2008); discussions on the remaining sensorial modalities, smell, taste and pressure, are scarcer. In this paper I will investigate modernist fiction in the light of a sensorial aesthetic that (a) relates to text as sensorial rather than as perceptive, e.g. the production of sensorial perception in readers rather than perception inherently already being part of literary discourse, and (b) focuses mainly on smell, taste and the auditive. Rather than investigating why modernism, in particular, accentuated sensorial modalities, my paper is concerned with aesthetic strategies and emotive reception. This investigation will, apart from sketching some general historical and theoretical outlines, mainly discuss examples from texts by Malcolm Lowry, Virginia Woolf, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner, in order to convincingly establish a relation between modernist fiction and sensorial aesthetics.

  • 14.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Multimodal Modernism2015In: Writing Literary History: Europe 1900 - 1950, Leuven: KU Leuven , 2015, p. 30-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viktor Shlovsky wrote almost hundred years ago that there is art that makes one “recover the sensation of life”. His famous remark “to make the stone stony” refers, in my mind, to the very concept of a sensorial aesthetic; objects should be described as they are sensed not as they are perceived. Modernist novels occupy an ambiguous space between being mono-medial and multi-modal, acting as both self-referencing works of art and, at the same time, evidently referring to and being inspired by other media such as cinematography and music. Studies of modernist fiction, and its relation to the sensorial modalities vision and sound, are numerous and convincing, especially in concordance with modernity and technology (Danius 2002; Jacobs 2001; Kern 1983; Kundu 2008); discussions on the remaining sensorial modalities, smell, taste and pressure, are scarcer. In this paper I will investigate modernist fiction in the light of a multimodal aesthetic that (a) relates to text as sensorial rather than as perceptive, e.g. the production of sensorial perception in readers rather than perception inherently already being part of literary discourse, and (b) focuses mainly on smell, taste and the auditive. In addition to investigating why modernism, in particular, accentuated sensorial modalities, my paper is concerned with aesthetic strategies and emotive reception. This investigation will, apart from sketching some general historical and theoretical outlines, mainly discuss examples from texts by Malcolm Lowry and William Faulkner, in order to convincingly establish a relation between modernist fiction and sensorial aesthetics.

  • 15.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Nature vs Culture: A Transmediation from Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) into The Nature-on-a-Rampage Film Genre of the 1970s2016In: Transmediations! Communcation Across Media Borders: Abstracts. Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, October 13-15, 2016, Linnaeus University , 2016, p. 74-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Joshua David Bellin argues convincingly that Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) was highly influenced by both the nuclear threat of the 1950s and popular science fiction from the same decade, most prominently the Big-bug and alien invasion films (146). Carson’s seminal work of popular fiction is “as much a work of science fiction as of science fact,” writes Bellin (145). This leads Bellin to investigate a classic Big-bug film, Them!, in order to trace, backwards, how Silent Spring grows out of common ideological concerns of the 1950s. In this paper, I will take this method a step further and study how Silent Spring (as a representative of popular science), mainly in its critique of the pesticide industry, influences the nature-on-a-rampage film genre of the 1970s. One chapter in Silent Spring is called “Nature Fights Back” and both the 1950s Big-bug and the 1970s nature-on-a-rampage films demonstrate a nature retaliating against culture. The main difference is that in the 1950s films the fighting back is predominantly represented by a single, giant mutated animal (nuclear threat), whereas in the 1970s films animals attack in enormous masses but in realistic size (pesticides). This paper will monitor the transmediation of certain key components and tropes of Silent Spring into two nature-on-a-rampage films: Tarantulas: The Deadly Cargo (1977) and Kingdom of Spiders (1977). Silent Spring is clearly contextualized, and contextualizing, ideas of dystopia, apocalypse, evil science, technophobia, human mastery of environment, as well as advocating modern environmentalism. I will look into these aspects of the source text and explore how they are transmitted to the target films. Are the dichotomies between culture and nature really as stable as one might think? Furthermore, I will also speculate on reasons for why spiders in particular are so apt to represent threats to humanity, as in the two films mentioned. Finally, I will take Bellin’s words seriously and look into how popular science also promotes, within its own structures, science fiction. What are the dialogical and transmedial consequences between scientific discourse and aesthetic media? Analyzing the relationship between a scientific discourse and aesthetic media almost half a century ago will illustrate a relationship and feedback process that hopefully illuminates how these relationships function today when it comes recent issues within the anthropocene: global warming and climate change.

    Works Cited:

    Bellin, Joshua David. “Us or Them!: Silent Spring and The ‘Big Bug’ Films of the 1950s.” Extrapolation 50.1 (2009): 145-167

  • 16.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Nostalgia and Modernism2013In: Time and Temporality in European Modernism and the Avant-Gardes (1900-1950), Leuven: University of Leuven , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modernism and NostalgiaThis paper sets out to investigate how the consequences of modernity affected European modernist literature’s attitudes towards nostalgia and how this attitude facilitated the development of a particular modernist literary nostalgic aesthetic.If we define nostalgia as a refusal to accept the conditions of life, the flowing of time (the time arrow), and the inevitability of extinction, we owe much to modernity which fuelled nostalgia with an unprecedented awareness of time. The new concepts of time started a teleological rampage, a strong belief in the ideas of progress. The past was outdated; the future goal of progress was a constant improvement in human social affairs and life style.It was a time of contrasts, of conflicts between the old and the new. Maybe this time even could be described as “schizophrenic” as Karin Johannisson argues, an interior break as a result of living in two different worlds at the same time, alienation to the new urban world and modernization (133). Growing out of this “schizophrenia” was a strong longing for the past times, and “the slower rhythms of the past, for continuity, social cohesion and tradition” (Boym 16). If being modern was to be part of a universe in which, as Karl Marx said, “all that is solid melts into air” (qtd. in Berman 15), then being nostalgic is a symptom of poor adaptability to the modern way, and as such is a despicable “disease” in the eyes of progress.Modern nostalgia, then, bears a significant relation to modernity, as identified by recent scholars. Kimberly K. Smith argues that nostalgia actually is the “product of – and indelibly shaped by – nineteenth- and twentieth-century conflicts over the political significance of the past” and as such is related to progress as a “progressive paratheory” (505-06). Sylviane Agacinski writes that “[t]he idea of modernity refers less to a situation in time than it is itself a certain way of thinking about time, free from both eternity and so-called historical necessity” (20), thus configuring the temporally liberated notion of nostalgia. Also Svetlana Boym’s modern concept of nostalgia originates in its reaction to modernity: “I realized that nostalgia goes beyond individual psychology. At first glance, nostalgia is a longing for a place, but actually it is a yearning for a different time – the time of our childhood, the slower rhythms of our dreams. In a broader sense, nostalgia is rebellion against the modern idea of time, the time of history and progress” (xv).This paper will deal with the relations between modernity and nostalgia in modernist literature, predominantly English modernism. Why did the English modernists have such an inclination for nostalgia? How did this inclination manifest itself in the form and style of their writing?Works CitedAgacinski, Sylviane. Time Passing: Modernity and Nostalgia. Trans. Jody Gladding. European Perspectives: A Series in Social Thought and Cultural Criticism. New York: Colombia University Press, 2000.Berman, Marshall. All That is Solid Melts Into Air: The Experience of Modernity. London: Verso, 1983.Boym, Svetlana. The Future of Nostalgia. New York: Basic Books, 2001.Johannisson, Karin. Nostalgia: en känslas historia. Smedjebacken: Bonnier Essä, 2001.Smith, Kimberly K. “Mere Nostalgia: Notes on a Progressive Paratheory.” Rhetoric and Public Affairs 3.4 (2000): 505-27.

  • 17.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Edinburgh University.
    Nostalgia within the texts of F. Scott Fitzgerald2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925) is, and has, generally been considered a nostalgic novel, in the way it both explores individual private nostalgia through Gatsby’s longing for the past and a wider more collective desire for the past virginal dreams of a New World. Fitzgerald’s fascination of nostalgia is shown in his notebooks and earlier fiction, but is in reality an interest shared by many of the modernists as a reaction to the unprecedented changes in time concepts through industrialization, idea of progress, migration and the explorations of temporality by Kant, and later Bergson. Not to mention Freud’s influence on modernism’s ideas of consciousness and focalization.

       These changes did not only alter the content and themes of modernism, but also narrative strategies themselves. My paper is set out to explore how Fitzgerald in The Great Gatsby uses primarily the narrative strategy of textual memory to reinforce the thematic content of his novel. In dividing his novel in two distinct parts, that are separated through a variety of stylistic devices, and deploying a changeable prose that either creates a strong presence full of impressions, or a more reflective, distant style, he controls the reader’s nostalgic reading experience. Simply, as we progress through the narrative of Gatsby, we are first enhanced by the style which creates an enlarged textual memory, that we will later miss and therefore desire and long for. The summer prose of the first part seduces us, by connecting the story to our own subjective memories of past nostalgic dreams. Then: enter autumn. In the second part we are constantly reminded, through repetitions of themes and motifs, although somewhat changed, of the first part. But all the gaiety and spontaneity of early summer has been replaced by human failure, tragedy and dissolution; in short a party and its hangover.

       When we speak of The Great Gatsby as a novel about nostalgia, we refer to its thematic content. But we might also call it, borrowing the analogy from Paul Ricœur, anostalgic novel in the way its form and style provokes a nostalgic reading experience.

  • 18.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Nostalgic Aesthetics: The Fictive Nostalgic Experience2017In: Presented at the 2nd International Interdisciplinary Conference "Memory, Melancholy and Nostalgia". Gdansk, Poland, 7-8 December 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Nostalgic Aesthetics: The Fictive Nostalgic Experience”

    In this paper I will introduce and discuss the idea of a specific nostalgic mood, or more specifically nostalgic aesthetics. Nostalgia is not only about reviving the past, about commercial retro ideas, about liking French new wave films. It is also about a specific aesthetic mood, and this mood can be evoked in a reader through a nostalgic poetics.

    The critical literature about this experience has been very sparse. Fred Davis, in his monumental Yearning for Yesterday: A Sociology of Nostalgia (1979), is one of the few who acknowledges the part aesthetics play in nostalgic art: “So frequently and uniformly does nostalgic sentiment seem to infuse our aesthetic experience that we can rightly begin to suspect that nostalgia is not only a feeling or mood that is somehow magically evoked by the art object but also a distinctive aesthetic modality in its own right […]” (73). Davis complains that “the musicologist, the art historian, and the literary critic” (83) have not yet defined such a style. The relationships between narrative texts, individual and collective memory, and affective, perceptive and cognitive reception of these texts can constitute the basis of a simulated, fictive nostalgic experience of narrative art. In this paper I will illustrate these relations through a few illustrative narrative examples in order to introduce the idea of nostalgic aesthetics as a particular experience of fiction.

    Works Cited:

    Davis, Fred. Yearning for Yesterday: A Sociology of Nostalgia. London: New York Free Press, 1979.

  • 19.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Nostalgic Utopia2014In: Utopia: Fourth Bi-annual Conference of the European Network for Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies, Helsinki: University of Helsinki , 2014, p. 172-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is another space/time for longing that we categorize as a utopian, mythical or fictive time outside the temporal reality. In nostalgic utopia we find a sort of pastness as is seen in the biblical paradise with its references to Eden, a Golden Age or an Elysium. In the utopian ideal of the future, an aspect of the virginal dreams of the past always resides, involving a return to myths or a former culture prior to industrialization. Utopian nostalgia then shares much with some of the essentials of nostalgia: a wish for immortality and the disillusionment of the present. Sylvia Mary Darton writes in Nostalgia for Paradise (1965) that the “memory of a ‘lost’ paradise’ has never ceased to haunt the minds of men, arousing in them a mysterious ‘nostalgia’, a longing for some perfection, some happiness, freedom and complete sense of well being of which it feels itself to have been deprived” (13). This urge was strong among modernist writers. This paper will investigate how their nostalgia is attributed to utopian ideals in their usage of symbols that are derived from the different paradise myths: the tree, water, and the garden.

  • 20.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Once Upon a Time: Nostalgic Narratives in Transition2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past has never seemed further away. The many tomorrows inherent in every new technology, product, and digitally mediated event drive us further away from our collective and individual histories. Yet our present seems nonetheless stubbornly rooted in the past, a past that has been dying very slowly for a very long time. Nostalgia, then, appears

    increasingly to be a modality with major potential for understanding how our now is shaped by our then, both individually and collectively. The past may be a foreign country but it is also inescapably our homeland, the place from which we attempt to emigrate but return to again and again is a series of personal and cultural nostalgic voyages which shape the line and weight of our own times and places. From the cinema to the TV screen, from the pages of the latest best-selling novel to the lines of the obscure academic poet, the powerful emotional and intellectual impact of the set of emotions, ideas, and associations linked to nostalgia are critical compositional devices.

    To ignore this element of our aesthetic culture, or to condemn it outright as politically naïve and intellectually regressive, would be to miss, and thus misread, substantial portions of contemporary culture. Nostalgia and the nostalgic analysis of cultural products have enormous potential to help us understand the present.

    This anthology explores narratives in the spirit of a nostalgic methodology, thus revealing unexpected and unfamiliar aesthetic and political dimensions of our present moment’s diverse transient textual communications. The collection includes nostalgic analyses of the life writing of Vladimir Nabokov and Orhan Pamuk, transnational and transracial adoption narratives, the poetry of Tony Harrison and Lars Gustafsson, nostalgic representations of Europe by American artists such as Mary Maxwell and Woody Allen, contemporary nostalgic commemorations of The First World War, Fred Boot’s musical Soldier of Orange, Karl Ove Knausgård’s My Struggle, the Harry Potter series, and two seminal nostalgic films from the 1970s, American Graffiti and The Last Picture Show.

  • 21.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    “Our flame, the will-o’-the-wisp that dances in a few eyes, is soon to be blown out and all will fade”: Modern Literary Nostalgia as Death Mood2018In: Books Now: Gdansk Journal of Humanities, E-ISSN 2353-4699, no 9, p. 109-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that there is a difference between nostalgic emotion and nostalgic mood and that the latter one often is a result of nostalgia’s inevitable link to death, entropy and teleology. It examines how nostalgic tropes, such as ruins, childhood, youth, astronomical representations, and subjective time (duration), inherited from the romantic poetry function as, and create, nostalgic death moods and retardations of eschatology in modernist fiction.

  • 22.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    "Our flame, the will-o'-the-wisp that dances in a few eyes, is soon to be blown out and all will fade": Nostalgia as Death Mood2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Reading Nostalgia : Textual Memory in The Great Gatsby2014In: F. Scott Fitzgerald Review, ISSN 1543-3951, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 67-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Roundtable: Translating Fitzgerald2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Stalk and Slash in the Class2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to some recent popular viral articles, watching horror films is purely profitable in terms of individual health. A recent article in The Telegraph, for example, explains that experiencing a horror film can burn 200 calories which is equivalent to a half hour walk. Could this be a reason to bring in the horror film genre in the upper secondary classroom? Well, no, but using horror films in school can be profitable in other ways. This paper will present some of the advantages of and opportunities with using horror films didactically and initiate a broader discussion on emotions, didactics and film. 

  • 26.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Apocalyptic Sublime: Narrating Environmental Disaster2017In: Presented at 2017 International Conference on Narrative, Lexington, Kentucky, March 23-26, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Niklas Salmose’s paper “The Apocalyptic Sublime: Narrating Environmental Disaster” observes that the concept of the anthropocene has uprooted the traditional dichotomy between nature and culture, subject and object, and that it has also proven difficult to both understand the anthropocene and to represent it in narrative. While Hollywood spectacle adventure like The Day After Tomorrow (2004) and 2012 (2009) attempt to evoke what could be described as an apocalyptic sublime, this paper argues that the use of this apocalyptic sublime as a narrative technique diminishes the true anthropocene impact of the apocalyptic block-buster films to instead re-establish the American subject as one of individual agency. 

  • 27.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Mediterranean Exotic as Nostalgia: Lost Worlds and Found Worlds in D.H. Lawrence’s The Lost Girl2016In: Mediterranean Modernism. Origins and Otherness in 20th Century «Modernisms», 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates why there is an inclination in modernism to portray nostalgic space with Southern territories, and more specifically, in the case of D. H Lawrence’s The Lost Girl (1920), with the Mediterranean. The modernists’ exploration of nostalgic moods and tropes is well documented; the First World War became a symbolic rupture between past and present in contemporary imagination, and many modernist texts works structurally with split narratives, where a fathomed present is contrasted by a vigorous past, thematically and stylistically. Similarly, D. H. Lawrence’s works explicitly make use of this strategy of juxtaposing the natural and the cultural, as can be seen in The Rainbow and Women in Love. Lawrence’s relationship to the Mediterranean is ambivalent, but is situated within a historical context of the Mediterranean as both a location of an epistemological and escapist nature. In The Lost Girl, Lawrence’s earlier ironic ridicule of the South has been replaced by a genuine belief in the undeveloped Mediterranean backwater as a representative of a natural human state of cosmic unity. The well-documented nostalgia for a paradisiacal past, as the Mediterranean South represents in Northern and Western culture, this paper argues, is utilized in The Lost Girl in order to create a modernist critique of industrialization and progress. This paper illustrates Lawrence’s specific stylistic approach to Mediterranean nostalgia.

  • 28.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Nostalgic Experience in A Farewell to Arms2018In: XVIII International Hemingway Conference: Hemingway in Paris, “Paris est une fête”... Hemingway's Moveable Feast, July 22-28, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Phenomenological Experience of Childhood2014In: The End of Place as We Know It, 17 – 19 September 2014: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Rune Graulund, 2014, p. 16-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nostalgia evoked through the use of childhood is generally achieved by addressing the world of childhood as an alternative to the present. This is done either through the use of an idealized space or time, by reinforcing its past character, or by using common symbols or representations of childhood that force the reader into the sensations of his own past childhood. A third alternative, that of engaging the reader in a childhood consciousness is less explored. This paper will examine how literature actually can transport the reader into not only the idealized world of childhood, but more so into the very phenomenological experience of childhood through the use of different kind of narrative moods and techniques. It will do so by analysing two texts, Virginia Woolf’s The Waves (1931) and Tarjei Vesaas’ Is-slottet [The Ice Palace] (1963), which represent two different strategies producing potential phenomenological experiences of childhood in readers. The initial chapter in Woolf’s The Waves is a journey for the reader through the consciousness of childhood, which through its non-linguistic syntax opens up the possibility of childhood identification and hence nostalgia.The most important factor that creates a childhood consciousness in Vesaas’ Is-slottet is undoubtedly the extensive use of free indirect speech in order to captivate the inner world of the two children, mainly that of Siss. Through the use of FIS, the world of the children or childhood is communicated through a similar, but less radical, focalization as we have seen in The Waves. The lack of rationality, limitations in expression, simplicity, repetitions, and a tense detailed experience of the physical, forms the phenomenological base for childhood identification.

  • 30.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Rustle of Swede Girls: A Speculation of the Representation of Scandinavians in Fitzgerald’s Fiction2017In: 14th International F. Scott Fitzgerald Society Conference: Saint Paul, Minnesota 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In The Beautiful and Damned Fitzgerald depicts a Swedish maid as ”broad-hipped, broad-shouldered” and ”icy-hearted”. With the exception of the “rustle of Swede girls” that infatuates Pastor Schwarz in “Absolution” in the “lost Swede town” most references to Sweden is through maids, servants or domestics usually in a slightly pejorative manner. “Servants all that way nowadays,” thinks Evelyn in “The Cut-Glass Bowl”, “[i]f she could get a good Irishwoman—but you couldn’t any more—and these Swedes——“. They generally represent the gloomy side of Midwestern life: “Scandinavians,” says Patton to Sally Carrol in “The Ice Palace”, “have the largest suicide rate in the world.” Much critical attention has been directed towards Fitzgerald’s ethnic stereotyping of blacks and Jews; this paper will instead look at the representation of Scandinavians in his fiction. As Suzanne del Gizzo demonstrates in “Ethnic Stereotyping” the formula for success in Fitzgerald’s early writing is Aryan, such as Gloria being a “Nordic Ganymede” and Anthony possessing Nordic features in The Beautiful and Damned. Hence, one would imagine that the representation of actual Scandinavians would be slightly more endorsing. The fact that most depicted Scandinavians belong to the lower classes (and Fitzgerald might remember the Swedish maids on Summit Ave. vividly), then suggests that social class overrides ethnicity in Fitzgerald’s narratives. However, class and ethnicity becomes increasingly muddled in the character of Jules Peterson, black shoemaker from Stockholm, who is murdered in Tender is the Night.  This paper will explore how Fitzgerald uses Scandinavian characters in his fiction, investigate the power of these characters’ social and cultural context, and speculate on the reasons behind this particular use.

  • 31.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Sounds and Smells of the South: The Auditive and Olfactory in Fitzgerald’s Tarleton trilogy2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “It is a grotesquely pictorial country as I found out long ago, and as Mr. Faulkner has since abundantly demonstrated,” wrote F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1940 to his daughter Scottie about the South (The Crack Up, 295. The seductive vividness of the Dixie landscape was thoroughly and romantically reconstructed in Fitzgerald’s short narratives of the South, particularly in what is usually named the Tarleton Trilogy. The allusion to Faulkner is obvious, since Faulkner’s imagery of the South in the The Sound and the Fury contains a precision and tangibility that is similar to Fitzgerald’s approach.

     In the Tarleton stories, Fitzgerald lavishly uses sounds and smells in addition to a purely visual staging of the South, in order to establish the South as “other”, more natural and a representative of the universal past.

     However, it seems like Fitzgerald’s particularly romantic imagination of the South declined in the 1930s, which can be illustrated in how the use of sound changed from depicting the “cricket-loud lawn[s]” in “The Jelly-Bean” (155) or the breeze that “ripple[s] the fluffy curls” of Sally Carrol Happer in “The Ice Palace” (51), to the horror of a tornado in “Family in the Wind” from 1932: “It was not a collection of sounds, it was just Sound itself; a great screeching bow drawn across the chords of the universe.” (ch. 2)

     This paper will discuss to what effect the prosaic sounds and smells of the South in the Tarleton stories supplement Fitzgerald’s general dichotomy of the North and the South which is unquestionably connected to nostalgia. Nostalgia is often related to negative implications of the time arrow, and Karl F. Zender talks about how sound in Faulkner’s fiction produces “a heightened awareness of the destructive power of time” (91). This could equally be stretched to include the olfactory. Similar to Faulkner, Fitzgerald uses both an auditive and olfactory prose style to amplify the sensory experience of the Southern settings in a nostalgic manner. “The South sang to us” exclaims the narrator in “The Last of the Belles” (458) and the fragrance of forgotten “magnolia flowers” (460) lingers around his memories. Since Fitzgerald’s narrative strategies often imply a subsequent narration, ”the destructive power of time” tends to appear in the collision between the awareness of time past and time present, between the melancholia of narration and in the present descriptions of the setting of one’s youth.

     

     

     

  • 32.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    The Use of Textual Memory in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Salmose, Niklas
    The University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Towards a Poetics of Nostalgia: The Nostalgic Experience in Modern Fiction2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a body of studies relating nostalgia and fiction in political, sociological, feminist, or historical ways. This thesis, instead, sets out to perform an unusual textual study of nostalgia in modern fiction in order to work towards a poetics of nostalgia. Although the experience of emotion is private, the object of analytical discourse must be to approach this experience with objective tools. The thesis therefore develops a method for analyzing the experience of nostalgia in literary texts and then uses this method to study how nostalgia can be evoked in readers. The method works through close textual readings, developed through reader-response and narratological theories and validated through a thorough investigation of modern nostalgia in general. The result is a taxonomy of nostalgic strategies that possibly create nostalgic reactions in readers.

  • 34.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Translating All the Sad Young Men into Swedish: Close Reading par Excellence2016In: The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review, ISSN 1543-3951, E-ISSN 1755-6333, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 136-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that translation is always close reading par excellence. Thestarting point is the author’s translation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story collectionAll the Sad Young Men (1926) into Swedish, Alla sorgsna unga män (2014).Focusing less on particular translation methods and theories, this article insteadlooks at how the translation process forces emphasis on, and interpretation of,synchronic and diachronic dilemmas. Translation thus becomes a method foranalyzing literary style and context differently than from a native language perspective.The article is structured in two main sections, looking at some examplesof the synchronic and diachronic difficulties involved in the translation process.The synchronic section argues that Fitzgerald’s use of punctuation, and especially1-em and 2-em dashes, are highly original to his literary style. This section alsoclaims that Fitzgerald’s style is dependent on the advanced use of polysyndeton,allusion, auditive aesthetics, metonymy, and personification. The diachronic sectiondiscusses a few interesting contextual cases that illuminate how Fitzgeraldinterweaves contemporary events into the universal themes of his work, creatingnot only the local and temporal color of the jazz age, but also involving readersin what Partington refers to as the “smugness effect”: a collusion between authorand reader. In summary, using the translation process as an analytical tool revealselements of literary style and contextual writing in Fitzgerald’s prose that mightotherwise have gone unnoticed.

  • 35.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    War at Distance: Women, Neutrality and Aesthetics in Swedish World War One Writing2017In: Presented at The Fictional First World War : Imagination and Memory Since 1914. An International Conference at the Centre for the Novel: University of Aberdeen, 6-9 April 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    We Spiders: Spider as the Monster of Modernity in the Big Gug and Nature-on-a-Rampage Film Genres2015In: Animal Horror Cinema: Genre, History and Criticism / [ed] Katarina Gregersdotter, Johan Höglund, Nicklas Hållén, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 1, p. 146-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In popular imagination, arachnids are generally associated with negative qualities. They are cunning, evil, dextrous, ruthless, poisonous, ugly creatures, something to avoid and fear. The low-budget film The Giant Spider Invasion (1975) does nothing to contradict the image of the evil spider. The sheriff in the film even compares the giant spider to another popular cinematic nemesis: ‘Did you ever see that movie Jaws? Well, [the spider] makes that shark look like a goldfish!’ In fact, its maliciousness is at the centre of the film’s premise: a meteor crash in Wisconsin opens up a gate between earth and hell, and unleashes pure ‘purgatory’ evil in the shape of a giant spider. The biblical and apocalyptic scope of this event is further established through a brief parallel story of an agitated preacher citing Book of Revelation. A fundamentalist revival meeting is inserted as a flash montage throughout the film, clearly providing the audience with a key to the film’s morality and a link between the cinematic antagonist, the spider, and the lack of pure Christian faith. The inhabitants of Wisconsin appear to live a rather immoral life before the spider arrives, engaged in boozing, adultery, incest and paedophilia. The first half of the movie is no more than sexploitation, with a staggering and zooming camera willing to explore every inch of semi-nude and under-aged femininity; it is a familiar structure of sin and purging.

  • 37.
    Salmose, Niklas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Törnqvist, Peter
    Kvinnoröster ur första världskrigetCollection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38. Waltregny, Elisabeth (Photographer)
    Delville, Michel
    Salmose, Niklas (Editor)
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Ali e t o lo ss2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Erasurist art is essentially a kind of rewriting. It is rooted as much in contemporary philosophy’sdeconstructionistturn as in Duchampian foundobjects and Situationist détournements. One of the earliest examples of textual erasurism in contemporary poetry is Ronald Johnson’s 1977 RADI OS, a partial obliteration of the first four books of John Milton’s Paradise Lost preserving only a few words from each page of the source-text. Ali e t o lo ss subjects Lewis Carroll’s Ali(c)e T(hr)o(ugh the) Lo(oking Gla)ss to a similar treatment,revealing the lyrical backbone of the source-text,isolating some of its vital semantic «organs» whilesimultaneously responding to the deep and complexforms of Elisabeth Waltregny’s photographs, whichwere themselves inspired by Lewis Carroll’s specularworlds. Each poem is composed of words taken fromone of the twelve chapters of Alice in the order inwhich they appear, the line breaks indicating the«gaps» in the source-text.

  • 39.
    Salmose, Niklas (Translator, Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald - Alla sorgsna unga män2014Artistic output (Unrefereed)
1 - 39 of 39
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