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  • 1. Achinger, Christine
    et al.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Hamburg University, Germany ; Lund University.
    Jentz, Janina
    Mühlhäuser, Regina
    Engendering Airwaves: Zur Konstruktion von Geschlecht im Radio2001In: Radio-Kultur und Hör-Kunst: Zwischen Avantgarde und Popularkultur 1923-2001 / [ed] Andreas Stuhlmann, Würzburg: Verlag Königshausen & Neumann, 2001, p. 24-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    ‘A fragment of the world’: An interview with Petra Bauer2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 189-193Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 3.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Hamburg University, Germany ; Halmstad University.
    Allegory, Performativity, and Intervention: The Function of Travelogues in a Contested Space. A comment on Charlotte Tornbjer2009In: Borders as Experience / [ed] KG Hammarlund, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2009, p. 201-215Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University.
    Amateur home movies and the archive of migration: Sandhya Suri's I for India (2005)2010In: Tourists and Nomads. Amateur Images of Migration. Second Interdisciplinary Conference on Amateur Images 22 – 24 April 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Encompassing 40 years of immigrant life in Britain, Sandhya Suri’s filmic essay I for India (2005) is a collage of amateur home movies, British newsreels as well as film stock shot by the director herself. The home movie footage was filmed by Suri’s father who came to Britain as an immigrant doctor in the 1960s and who exchanged super8-films andaudio reels as cine-letters about his new life with his family in India. After having rediscovered the material on the attic of her family home, Sandhya Suri transformed it into her graduate thesis film at the The National Film and Television School in London. Dealing with memory, nostalgia and migrant experiences in Britain, I for India establishes a counter-history to the hegemonic national discourse in which migrant experiences are marginalized, objectified or rendered invisible.My paper is going to examine the role of the amateur footage for reflecting on the ontology of the image and the materiality of the different film formats. How does the reception of the footage change in the course of its dissemination? In what way does the filmic montage in I for India contribute to challenging the dominant media discourse on Asians in Britain? I would like to argue that the amateur footage helps to counter the ethnographic, Eurocentric gaze on the new citizens and subverts the hegemonic use of images of migrants as a means of control and classification (Alan Sekula) or as a weapon (Susan Sontag). How do the amateur images migrate into the collective (national) visual archive? Finally, the example of I for India might also show that Zygmunt Bauman’s binary opposition between tourists and nomads needs to be complicated.

  • 5.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University ; Hamburg University, Germany.
    Amateur Home Movies and the Archive of Migration: Sandhya Suri's I for India (UK, 2005)2012In: Tourists & Nomads: Amateur Images of Migration / [ed] Sonja Kmec, Viviane Thill, Marburg: Jonas Verlag , 2012, p. 153-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    "And the Winner Is...": The Hamburg EUFA Jury Meetings2017In: Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, ISSN 2009-4078, no 14, p. 214-218Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Antoine Damiens: LGBTQ Film Festivals: Curating Queerness: Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press 2020 (Film Culture in Transition), 295 S., ISBN 9463728406, EUR 105,- (Zugl. Dissertation in Film and Moving Image Studies at Concordia University, 2018)2021In: MEDIENwissenschaft: Rezensionen | Reviews, no 1, p. 44-45Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Kontext & kulturgränser (KK).
    Archiv und Gedächtnis im autobiografischen Film: Maria Langs experimentelles Home Movie Familiengruft. Liebesgedicht an meine Mutter (BRD, 1981/82)2013In: material, experiment, archiv: Experimentalfilme von Frauen / [ed] Annette Brauerhoch, Florian Krautkrämer & Anke Zechner, Berlin: b_books , 2013, 1, p. 89-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Archival narratives: Curating history and memory in digitized collections2019In: Structures and Voices: Storytelling in Post-Digital Times: The NECS 2019 Conference, Gdańsk 13-15. 06. 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do archives employ narratives and storytelling to curate access to their digitized collections? Drawing on the results of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (2016-2018), this paper examines how film archives recontextualise and contemporize historical content online, how they reflect upon it and how they cope with legal constraints and ethical considerations. It presents findings from studying the processes of regulation according to which some stories become ‘acknowledgeable’ while others are not recognized. This paper discusses how archives can foreground archival social inequalities as a result of collection policies, colonial representations or metadata management. It will look at ways of reflecting on hegemonic power structures in the curation of online content. The cases, looking especially at issues of race, class and sexuality, stem from both national film archives and ‘minor archives’, such as grass-root or community archives. Among these are ‘The BFI Player’, the online portal of the British Film Institute, and the Swedish website ‘Filmarkivet.se’, which has created access to some of the digitized collections from the Swedish National Film Archives, administered by the Swedish Film Institute (SFI) and the Royal Library (KB), as well as the Lesbian Home Movie Project (Maine) and bildwechsel, based in Hamburg.

  • 10.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Archival power and audiovisual memory: recognizing social inequality in film archives2019In: Power & the media. XXVII IAMHIST Conference: 16-18 July 2019, Northumbria University, UK, Newcastle: Northumbria University , 2019, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can heritage institutions deal with the challenges of diversity policies and possibly work as an intervention into hegemonic memory? This paper looks at the dynamics of recognition and visibility in national film archives. Setting out to examine on what terms marginalised lives of social and ethnic minorities are made visible, it analyses the work of national film archives in Sweden and the UK. This approach positions the archive into an object of analysis, shifting the focus on the archive as a site of knowledge retrieval to a site of knowledge production (Foucault 1972, Stoler 2002). Instead of looking at ways of including minorities as a priori identities, I suggest studying the processes of regulation according to which different lifestyles and experiences become ‘acknowledgeable’ (Schaffer 2008, Thomas et al 2017). The paper discusses how archives can foreground archival social inequalities as a result of collection policies, colonial representations or metadata management.  It will look at ways of reflecting on hegemonic power structures in the curation of online content. The case studies will be ‘The BFI Player’, the online portal of the British Film Institute, and the Swedish website ‘Filmarkivet.se’, which has created access to some of the digitized collections from the Swedish National Film Archives, administered by the Swedish Film Institute (SFI) and the Royal Library (KB).

  • 11.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Hamburg University, Germany ; Halmstad University.
    Archival practice as counter memory: Preserving the cultural heritage of independent video workshops2011In: NECS (European Network for Cinema and Media Studies) – The London Conference, Sonic Futures: Soundscapes and the Languages of Screen Media, University of London, June 23-26, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Archival tactics and queer vulnerability: Curating access to audiovisual heritage in Europe2018In: media tactics and engagement, The NECS 2018 Conference: Amsterdam, Netherlands. June 27-29, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can heritage institutions deal with the challenges of diversity policies and possibly work as an intervention into hegemonic memory? This paper looks at the dynamics of recognition and queer visibility in audiovisual heritage. Setting out to examine on what terms queer lives are made visible, it analyses how national film archives in Sweden and the UK acknowledge queer vulnerability when following their diversity policies. This approach positions the archive into an object of analysis, shifting the focus on the archive as a site of knowledge retrieval to a site of knowledge production (Foucault 1972, Stoler 2002). Instead of looking at ways of including minorities as a priori identities, I suggest studying the processes of regulation according to which different lifestyles and experiences become ‘acknowledgeable’ (Schaffer 2008, Thomas et al 2017). These archival practices include the choice of metadata, the modes of selection for public screenings and online exhibition as well as the curation and contextualisation of online content. The case studies will be ‘The BFI Player’, the online portal of the British Film Institute, and the Swedish website ‘Filmarkivet.se’, which has created access to some of the digitised collections from the Swedish National Film Archives, administered by the Swedish Film Institute (SFI) and the Royal Library (KB).

  • 13.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    “Archival Vulnerabilities”: Invited talk2021In: The Whole Life Academy, Workshop no 04 “Archival Burnout in the Age of Vulnerability: [Disobedient] Commons and their Dilemmas, Speculations, Emotions”. Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin. 13. November 2021, Haus der Kulturen der Welt , 2021Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Archiving AIDS activist video: A conversation with Jim Hubbard2018In: A Visual History of AIDS: Exploring the Face of AIDS film archive / [ed] Elisabet Björklund, Mariah Larsson, London & New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 183-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Archiving for the Future, but Forgetting the Past?: Digitizing European Film Heritage and its Pitfalls.2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Archiváló beavatkozások2023In: Apertura, ISSN 1787-7245, no ŐszArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ungersk översättning av ett kapitel ur Brunows Remediating Transcultural Memory (Berlin/Boston: deGruyter 2015)

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  • 17.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Arkivering som konstnärlig handling: videogruppen bildwechsel i Hamburg2020In: Walden. Tidskrift för filmkritik, ISSN 2002-2891, no 19/20, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Arkivfynd2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Om arkivets hemligheter utifrån ett oidentifierat vykort till Elin Wägner som Brunow under ett besök på KvinnSam hittat i Barbro Alvings samling. Hon identifierar författaren som Ester Blenda Nordström och Fatima Bremmer, Nordströms biograf, hjälper henna av avkoda texten.

  • 19.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Att curatera ett queert levande arkiv: Om The Swedish Archive for Queer Moving Images2020In: Paletten, ISSN 0031-0352, no 321-322, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Att sätta arkivet i rörelse: Barbara Hammer2019In: Magasinet Walden, Tidskrift för filmkritik, ISSN 2002-2891, no 15/16, p. 4-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Audiovisual Memory and Placemaking in the Music City: Salford Lads in the Digital Era2020In: Book of Abstracts, Groove the City 2020: Constructing and Deconstructing Urban Spaces Through Music, 2nd International Conference of the Urban Music Studies Scholars’ Network, February 13th - 15th, 2020, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Lüneburg: Leuphana University of Lüneburg , 2020, p. 11-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the remediation of memory as a method of place making and negotiating urban spaces through music. It shows how music memories can be mobilised through the interplay of locations and digital tools. City tours, audio walks, tourist amateur photography or selfies in front of iconic buildings contribute to mapping the city. In classical concepts around the locatedness of memory (e.g. Pierre Nora’s notion of the lieux de mémoire), memories are tied to specific places. Yet, what is the ‘site’ of memory in times of digitization? The third wave of memory studies (Erll, Rigney, Rothberg) has focused on the transnational dynamics of memory, of memory as a process, as never stable, as always in flux. Drawing on my recent research on the digitization of audiovisual heritage, on the remediation of transcultural memory and on the construction of post-punk memory in Manchester, I argue that remediation creates nodal points (mnemotopes) around which narratives of the past are constructed. These mnemotopes can be mobilised for city branding (Brunow 2019). The paper argues that digital cultures (e.eg. social media) can be a means of “bringing home” transnational memories, tying these back into the local urban scape while remaining constantly in flux. Two cases of living archives will serve as theoretical objects to exploring the tensions of de- and reterritorialization within urban memory cultures: 1) The Salford Lad’s Club and 2) The Manchester Music Tours, a guided tour to locations relevant to bands such as Joy Division, The Smiths or Oasis.

  • 22.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University ; Hamburg University, Germany.
    Before YouTube and Indymedia: Cultural memory and the archive of video collectives in Germany in the 1970s and 1980s2012In: Studies in European Cinema, ISSN 1741-1548, E-ISSN 2040-0594, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collective film-making practice in Germany is still a blind spot in film historiography. During the 1970s and 1980s independent film and video workshops established a nationwide network to provide ‘counter information’ (Negt/Kluge) in order to challenge dominant media representations. Therefore, the works of the video collectives can become a relevant source for historians and journalists alike. While the videos can be perceived as an important contribution to left-wing cultural memory, this memory of the various media practices of the last decades is currently fading away. The videotapes slowly disintegrate and as digitization is costly and time-consuming, many video productions will not survive. This has consequences not only for historiography, but also for the visual iconography of cultural memory. This article focuses on the archival practice of three workshops in Hamburg, the stronghold for German independent film-making after 1968: the Medienpädagogikzentrum (Centre for Media Pedagogy, 1973–), bildwechsel (1979–), the umbrella organization for women in media, culture and art, and die thede (1980–), an association of documentary film-makers. The examples show how archival practice can be conceptualized not only as part of the hegemonic national archive alone, but also as an act of counter-memory.

  • 23.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Between Remembering and Forgetting: The Archive and Cultural Memory2018In: Documenta archiv Konferenz: Archiving the Unarchivable – Das Unarchivierbare archivieren: 22-24 November 2018, documenta archive, Kassel, Documenta Archiv , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of the ‘archival turn’ the digitization of archival collections has been regarded as an important means of countering forgetting, especially in view of analog film stock and videotapes slowly decaying. But has digitization become a hollow promise? Can long-term preservation really be granted? The initial optimism has been challenged by the increasing number of data cemeteries, too. These are due to short-lived digitization projects, which are lacking sustainable planning. And to add, archival storage alone does not automatically contribute to cultural memory. Instead, archival holdings need to be circulated again, preferably in various media environments, in order to feed into our constantly changing, dynamic cultural memory. This keynote address will explore the relation between memory and forgetting in the archive. Advocating for sustainable archival projects, it will discuss the impact of materiality (e.g. paper, videotapes and digital data). Looking at media specificity involves the question of what gets lost in media transformation, for example in video documentations of performance art or expanded cinema. Situating itself within recent trends in cultural memory studies, the talk will outline the challenges and possibilities of today’s archival practice. Drawing on a number of case studies from the documenta archive as well as other heritage institutions, it will present ways of curating access to digitized collections. Different modes of access allow for a re-circulation of the archive, thus providing ways of constructing cultural heritage and memory.

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    abstract (pdf)
  • 24.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Beyond Boundaries I: Im Gespräch mit Monika Treut2018In: Queer Cinema / [ed] Dagmar Brunow, Simon Dickel, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2018, p. 125-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Beyond Boundaries II: Im Gespräch mit Angelina Maccarone2018In: Queer Cinema / [ed] Dagmar Brunow, Simon Dickel, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2018, p. 189-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University.
    Black diasporic filmmaking and the political aesthetics of anti-essentialism2011In: 9th International Conference of the Collegium for African American Research, "Black States of Desire: Dispossession, Circulation, Transformation", Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, April 6-9, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fact that Black artists are quite often pigeonholed as spokespersons of Black experience is due to a mimetic understanding of art. Using examples from 1980s Black British diasporic filmmaking I would like to shift the analytical focus from representation and mimesis towards art as interventionist practice. The mysterious deaths of young Black men in police custody form the point of departure for an exploration of memory and mourning in Mysteries in July (Black Audio Film Collective, 1991). Additionally, the Sankofa film collective's Territories (1985) is an exploration of urban space, historiography, heterotopia and Black masculinities, while practices of surveillance and the framing of Blacks via media discourses are addressed in Handsworth Songs (Black Audio Film Collective 1986). These filmic essays, instead of looking at the black male as a given social problem, reflect on its construction through discourses of media and governmentality.

    Rather than creating a counter-discourse, these films abstain from trying to depict events "as they really happened". Instead, they deconstruct the hegemonic media discourse through the use of self-reflexive means. While counter practices often assume a unified essentialist stand (as in concepts of Afrocentrism and négritude, for example) I would suggest that in 1980s diasporic Black British filmmaking self-reflexivity is employed as a strategy which might be able to solve a notion of "strategic essentialism" (Spivak). Filmmaking thus serves as an epistemological tool to deal with the gaps, fissures and absences in the national visual archive and in hegemonic historiography while at the same time defying notions of homogeneity and authenticity. The use of self-reflexivity enables the films to reflect on modes of exclusion of the Black subject from hegemonic discourses on the ontology of the image and on the filmic apparatus. To sum up, my paper outlines auteurist strategies of dealing with the exclusion of both the official canon and of the collective visual archive of the nation.

  • 27.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Hamburg University, Germany.
    Bollywood im Zeitalter der Globalisierung: eine transnationale Perspektive auf populäres Hindikino2013In: Kunst als Avantgarde einer Weltkultur?, Muthesius Kunsthochschule, Kiel / Kunsthalle Kiel, Kiel, Germany, 6-8 June, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Das populäre Hindikino, schon immer hybrid, ist seit den 1990er Jahren ein globales Phänomen. Die Ausrichtung auf ein internationales Publikum hat Konsequenzen für die Produktion, Ästhetik und Distribution der Filme. Inwiefern kann eine transnationale Perspektive dem Wandel Bollywoods vom Kino zur Kulturindustrie (Rajadhyaksha) Rechnung tragen? Der Beitrag untersucht veränderte Distributionsbedingungen, lokale Rezeptionen und Aneignungen sowie Bollywoods globale Fankultur.

  • 28.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Hamburg University, Germany.
    Bollywood im Zeitalter der Globalisierung: eine transnationale Perspektive auf populäres Hindikino : Invited talk2013In: Kunst als Avantgarde einer Weltkultur? Muthesius Kunsthochschule, Kiel/Kunsthalle Kiel, 6-8 juni 2013., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Das populäre Hindikino, schon immer hybrid, ist seit den 1990er Jahrenein globales Phänomen. Die Ausrichtung auf ein internationales Publikumhat Konsequenzen für die Produktion, Ästhetik und Distribution derFilme. Inwiefern kann eine transnationale Perspektive dem WandelBollywoods vom Kino zur Kulturindustrie (Rajadhyaksha) Rechnung tragen?Der Beitrag untersucht veränderte Distributionsbedingungen, lokaleRezeptionen und Aneignungen sowie Bollywoods globale Fankultur.

  • 29.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Building transnational communities in feminist and queer film archives: digital archival practice between recognition and (dis)engagement2020In: Futures of Feminist and Queer Solidarities. Connectivity, Materiality, and Mobility in a Digitalized World: International Online Conference, September 30 – October 2, 2020. University of Gothenburg, Sweden, University of Gothenburg, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Circulating Audiovisual Memories: Archival Strategies of Curation (Invited keynote)2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Collaborative archiving and the curation of queer audiovisual memories2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Come together?: Curating communal viewing experiences for hybrid and online film festivals2020In: NECSUS : European Journal of Media Studies, E-ISSN 2213-0217, no Autumn 2020_#MethodArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are online festival editions completely unable to reproduce the community feel that analog festivals can create? This article sets out to challenge the simple binary of the analog versus the digital. Online viewing tends to be framed as an individual, solitary activity in contrast to the collective experience of watching a film offline in the cinema. Questioning the binary opposition often constructed between online and offline viewing, this article presents two best practice examples illustrating how a sense of community can be achieved while streaming films online. These two examples of communal viewing experiences in online formats, which I have been following during lockdown, are Carol Morley’s Friday Film Club and the event ‘Come Together’, arranged by the Swedish Archive for Queer Moving Images. Despite not being part of the film festival circuit, these cases provide best practice examples for film festival programming. 

  • 33.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Södertörn University.
    Conceptualising essay film research: canon formations between transnational film studies and "strategic auteurism"2015In: World Cinema and the Essay Film, Reading, 30 april-2 maj 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While publications on the essay film have hitherto focussed on white male filmmaking, thereby perpetuating Romanticism’s patriarchal, logocentric myth of the (male) genius, essay film research needs to broaden its scope to include female directors and/or directors-of-colour. Inclusive gestures alone, however, cannot challenge dominant canon constructions and their inherent dominance of the ‘usual suspects’, such as Resnais, Marker, Godard, or Farocki. Conceptualisations of World cinema (Chaudhuri 2005, Durovicova/Newman 2010, Nagib/Perriam/Dudrah 2012) and European cinema through a transnational perspective (Elsaesser 2005, Bergfelder 2005) can add new dimensions to essay film research, denouncing auteurism as one of the major points of reference for global film practice. However, a director's status as an auteur is still crucial for his or her critical reception, and as a result, for canon formation and its repercussions on film historiography. Conceptualising a film as an essay film can liberate it from a reductive critical reception as an expression of a minoritarian position. Using the example of John Akomfrah, my paper develops the concept of 'strategic auteurism', examining boththe self-fashioning of a filmmaker and his/her conceptualisation by curators and film scholars alike.

  • 34.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Countering Amnesia and Forgetting: Reworking Cultural Memory around the Victims of Right-Wing Violence : Invited keynote2017In: Doing Memory and Right-Wing Violence in Mediated Public Spheres: Workshop : 15.–16.10.2017, Fürstensaal, Schloss Hohentübingen, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Creating heritage and memory: digital film archives as sites of knowledge production2017In: From Dust to Dawn : Archival Studies After the Archival Turn: Uppsala 15–17 November 2017, Uppsala University, 2017, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated at the intersection of archivology, film studies and memory studies, my paper offers critical perspectives on the archive as a site of knowledge production. It investigates the construction of audiovisual heritage in digital film archives, based on my research project “The Cultural Heritage of Moving Images” (VR, 2016–2018). Drawing on theorizations of the archive by Foucault and Derrida, I regard the archive as an agent in its own right. In order to challenge the ongoing tendencies in film studies to focus on the preservation of film stock, my talk will foreground the role of the archivist as a curator. In my paper I will examine the use of metadata for the creation of a polyvocal cultural memory.

  • 36.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University ; Hamburg University, Germany.
    Cultural Memory as Counter Historiography: The Archival Practice of German Video Collectives2011In: The XXIV IAMHIST Conference (The International Association for Media and History), 6-10 July 2011, Copenhagen, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Curating Access: Digital Archives, Heritage and Diversity2016In: The NECS 2016 Conference in/between : cultures of connectivity: 10th Annual NECS Conference July 26-30, 2016, Potsdam, Germany, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Curating Access to Audiovisual Heritage: Cultural Memory and Diversity in European Film Archives2017In: Image [&] Narrative, ISSN 1780-678X, E-ISSN 1780-678X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 97-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archives, just like museums or libraries, are agents which contribute to the creation of our cultural memory. Inextricably linked to the notion of cultural heritage, they highlight some narratives, while sidelining or excluding others. Therefore it is important to critically reflect on the question “whose heritage” (Stuart Hall) is created in the process of archiving. This article looks at the politics of creating access to audiovisual heritage in European film archives via online video streaming opportunities. Examining audiovisual archives as agents in the construction of transnational memories, my research aims to provide new ways of reflecting on diversity practices in archival selection. As case study, this article examines the archival politics of the national film archives in Sweden, especially the way archivists are curating the site Filmarkivet.se.

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  • 39.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Curating Audiovisual Memories: Archival Ethics of Circulating Film Heritage (Invited keynote)2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Curating (Queer) Film Archives and Creating Online Communities in Times of the Pandemic: The Swedish Archive for Queer Moving Images (SAQMI)2020In: MAI: Feminism & Visual Culture, no 6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has inspired new forms of virtual community engagement. However, when events move online how can screenings maintain a sense of community, which has been so important when showcasing LGBTQIA + archives in actual venues? A valuable best practice example comes with an online event COME TOGETHER, which was arranged by The Swedish Archive for Queer Moving Images (SAQMI) in April 2020. Initially planned as a local gathering, the event moved online in response to the COVID-19 crisis. So, in what way can it serve as a model for other queer archives events?

    Dagmar Brunow, a film scholar at Linnaeus University in Sweden, and a member of the programming collective at the Hamburg International Queer Film Festival, speaks to Anna Linder (AL), the founder of SAQMI. The archive is the first to collect and curate queer moving images by filmmakers and video artists working in Sweden. SAQMI preserves their works and makes them accessible through curated film screenings, often in collaboration with festivals or cultural organisations from both Sweden and abroad.

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  • 41.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Hamburgs universitet, Germany ; Södertörns högskola.
    Dagmar Brunow läser Laura Mulvey: Mulvey reloaded - den manliga blicken och feministiskt filmskapande2013In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 4, p. 64-67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Das Archiv als Akteur: Videoarchive und die Mediatisierung des kulturellen Gedächtnisses2015In: Geschichte(n), Repräsentationen, Fiktionen – Medienarchive als Gedächtnis- und Erinnerungsorte Filmarchiv Austria, Wien, 7-8 maj 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Angesichts des archival turns in der Kunst (Enwezor 2008), des insbesondere im Kunstkontext ausgebrochenen “Archive Fevers” (Derrida 1995) und der regen Debatte um den Einfluss der Digitalisierung auf das Medium Film – und damit auch auf Bewahrung, Restaurierung, Distribution und Kuratieren von Film sowie seine Vorführung (Bohn 2013, Fossati 2009, Cherchi Usai et al 2008) vermag es zu überraschen, wie wenig die kulturwissenschaftliche Gedächtnisforschung sich bislang der Frage nach dem Archiv gewidmet hat. So wurde der Archivbegriff bislang vornehmlich in Bezug auf schriftliche, textbasierte Formen thematisiert (Assmann 1999), und nur in wenigen Fällen in Hinblick auf audiovisuelle Medien (VanDijck 2007, von Keitz/Weber 2012). In den Filmwissenschaften wurde die Arbeit von Filmarchiven vor allem unter dem Aspekt der Bewahrung, Restaurierung und Digitalisierung von Film untersucht (Frick 2011, Fossati 2009, Cherchi Usai et al 2008), weniger jedoch, wie es jüngst die Medienarchäologie vorschlägt, als eigener Akteur, dessen Entscheidungen – Metadaten, kuratorische Entscheidungen – angesichts von Auswahlprozessen einer kritischen Analyse zu unterziehen sind (Ernst 2007, Parikka 2012).

    Mein Vortrag plädiert zum einen für eine (Wieder-)Einführung des Archivbegriffs in die Gedächtnisforschung und dafür, die Materialität und diskursive Verfasstheit des Archivs zusammenzudenken. Insofern ist die im Zuge der Rezeption von Derridas „Archive Fever“ vorgenommene Zweiteilung von dem Archiv (als diskursivem Konstrukt) und den Archiven (als konkrete Archive) eher heuristisch zu verstehen, hat doch die Medienspezifik des “Archivs” komplexe Auswirkungen auf das kulturelle Gedächtnis. Daher richtet mein Beitrag die Aufmerksamkeit auf die Verschränkung von Materialität und Diskursivität bei Medienarchiven. Am Beispiel der Medienspezifik und diskursiven Verfasstheit von kulturellem Gedächtnis auf Video werden die Wechselbeziehungen und Verschränkungen von Medialität und Diskurs veranschaulicht. Meine These lautet, dass die Arbeit europäischer Videokollektive eine wichtige Quelle für die Medien- und Geschichtswissenschaften gleichermaßen bedeutet, dass aber viele dieser Quellen aufgrund der prekären Materiallage der Videobänder im Verschwinden begriffen sind. Untersucht wird dies am Beispiel der Archivpraxis dreier Hamburger Film- und Videokollektive (Medienpädagogikzentrum, Bildwechsel und die thede), die in den 1970er bzw. 1980er Jahren ihre Arbeit aufgenommen haben und bis heute existieren. Der Beitrag, der ein völlig vergessenes Stück Mediengeschichte in den Fokus der Betrachtung rückt, zeigt einmal mehr die Notwendigkeit einer medienspezifischen Betrachtungsweise für die kulturwissenschaftliche Gedächtnisforschung wie für die Archivtheorie gleichermaßen.

  • 43.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Decolonizing audiovisual heritage in Europe: Migrant and diasporic lives in national film archives2018In: Global Challenges 2018 : Borders, Populism and the Postcolonial Condition - An international conference on critical theory, postcoloniality, migration and populism: Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We cannot speak of the past without the archive, Stuart Hall famously stated. The archive, now a buzzword in the arts and humanities, cannot be conceptualised without taking power relations into account (Foucault, Derrida, Stoler). In his keynote “Whose Heritage” (1999), Hall points at the hegemonic whiteness and at the interests of the middle class invested in the creation of heritage and memory in the UK. In recent years, many heritage institutions in Europe have started to emphasize the (albeit problematic) notion of “diversity” as a fundamental requirement for their work. However, when it comes to the impact of digitisation on audiovisual heritage, a post-colonial perspective is still missing. This paper, which is part of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of Moving Images” (financed by the Swedish Research Council, 2016-18), looks at the ways national film archives in the UK and Sweden try to face the challenges involved in carving out a discursive space for migrant and diasporic memories. Arguing that it is not enough to merely “insert” these memories into the hegemonic narrative, it will discuss ways of decentering the audiovisual heritage of the nation. My paper will look at archival approaches to avoiding essentialism and dealing with the politics of representation in film images into which a colonial gaze is already inscribed. How can the colonial gaze be foregrounded (or subverted) when creating access to film collections through online curation? This paper argues for the need of the archivists to take a self-reflexive stand which highlights the role of the archive as an agent in its own right.

  • 44.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University ; Hamburg University, Germany.
    Deconstructing Essentialism and Revising Historiography: The Function of Metareference in Black British Filmmaking2011In: The Metareferential Turn in Contemporary Arts and Media: Forms, Functions, Attempts at Explanation / [ed] Werner Wolf, Katharina Bantleon, Jeff Thoss, New York: Rodopi, 2011, p. 341-355Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the function of the metareferential turn in black British filmmaking of the 1980s. Metaisation is here a result of the impact of European art cinema (Godard, Paradjanov, Kluge) as well as of Third Cinema practice and of the ‘essay film’ represented by Alain Resnais, Chris Marker and Jean-Luc Godard. Using the examples of Handsworth Songs and Seven Songs for Malcolm X by the Black Audio Film Collective, directed by John Akomfrah, as well as Isaac Julien’s Looking for Langston and The Attendant, this article outlines five functions of metareference. First, it can be regarded as a means to counter and reflect on the absences in the visual archive in Britain and of questioning the master narrative of British historiography. Second, it is used as a way of transgressing the boundaries of representation and of escaping the fruitless debate about negative and positive stereotypes. Third, metaisation is employed as an artistic strategy in order to inscribe oneself as an auteur into film historiography. Fourth, it can be regarded as a means of escaping the critical label of the social realist filmmaker who deals with the representation of black experiences. Finally, metaisation contributes to a reconceptualisation of the works in terms of both media theory and the essay film.

  • 45.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University.
    Deconstructing essentialism: metareference as aesthetic strategy in Black British filmmaking2009In: ”The Metareferential Turn in Contemporary Arts and Media: Forms, Functions and Attempts at Explanation”, Graz, Austria , 1-3 October, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University.
    Deconstructing representation: Handsworth Songs as media criticism and filmic intervention2009In: Screen Studies Conference: ”Screen Theorising Today”, Glasgow, Scotland, 3-5 July, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Södertörn University.
    Den rörliga bildens kulturarv: Minne, arkiv och videoband2016In: Minne, medier och materialitet / [ed] Johan Hegardt, Trond Lundemo, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, 1, p. 57-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Denken als Aktivismus: Stuart Hall zwischen Popkultur und Politik2015In: Stuart Hall: Aktivismus, Pop und Politik / [ed] Dagmar Brunow, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2015, p. 11-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 49.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Desire Lines: An interview on the sociality of film with B. Ruby Rich2023In: NECSUS : European Journal of Media Studies, E-ISSN 2213-0217, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A conversation with B. Ruby Rich, one of the most prolific film critics in the world. For decades she has been involved in film culture as a curator, film critic, professor, and journal editor. In this interview, Skadi Loist and Dagmar Brunow talk with Rich about her inspirations, her international encounters, and her take on film culture and criticism. Above all, this conversation highlights the importance of looking at the social relations that make film culture happen.

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  • 50.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad Univesrty.
    "Die Stadt hören": Soundscapes als Archive von Gentrifizierungsprozessen2010In: Music City Hamburg?! Musikalische Annäherungen an die 'kreative Stadt'. Internationale Konferenz des Landesmusikrat Hamburg und der Leuphana Universität, Lüneburg, Hamburg 22-24 october, 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
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