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  • 1.
    High, Christopher
    Open University, UK.
    Academic Seminar Blockade2011Other (Other academic)
  • 2.
    High, Christopher
    University of Warwick, UK.
    The value of plants in a Lowveld agricultural system: A case study of Dingleydale B, Bushbuckridge1996Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
  • 3.
    High, Christopher
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Buckler, Alison
    Open University, UK.
    Teachers work: The tacit pedagogy of expert teachers in rural Malawi2017In: Presented at EADI-NORDIC 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The status of school teachers in much ofrural Sub-Saharan Africa has a dual nature across many different countries. At the local level they are influential social actors, respectable people who are expected to provide a positive role model to their pupils and the wider local community. Within the national civil service, they are not often treated as very important - sometimes paid intermittently and frequently problematised as lacking in the capacit to deliver ambitious education-led national development strategies.

    In this paper we report on the results of a pilot study in rural Malawi, which sort to investigate the tacit knowledge and pedagogical skills of primary school teachers using participatory visual methods. Around a three week participatory video exercise with teachers from two schools, a combination of participatory action research, participant-observation, semi-structured and photo-elcited interviews and group reflection was analysed to understand how different data-gathering and analytical techniques could combine to surface and valorise the teachers' knowledge.

    Rather than a lack of skills and capacity, the data instead showed the range of skills and personal characteristics involved in the teachers' practice. Cognitive mapping on a subset of the data showed that the concept of active learning operationalised independently at two schools was (i) consisten, (ii) informed sophisticated practice, and (iii) was richer than that embedded in much external expert knowledge about teaching

  • 4.
    High, Christopher
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Buckler, Alison
    Open university, UK.
    When the best action happens behind the camera: Using participatory video to understand the implicit theories-in-practice of primary teachers in Malawi.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper covers the use of participatory video in a methodological pilot which took as its subject the experience of primary teachers in two schools in rural Malawi. School teachers in much of Sub-Saharan Africa have a dichotomous status. At the local level they are often respectable people who are expected to provide a positive role model to their pupils and the wider local community. Within national civil service hierarchies, they are often frequently problematized as lacking in the capacity to deliver on ambitious education-led national development strategies. This tension presents interesting ethical and methodological challenges in surfacing and valorising their role as experts in a way that speaks to people from outside of their local communities.The project used PV to appreciate the implicit theories-in-practice of teachers; exploring the different kinds of data and analytical options that the PV process can generate to understand local practices and understandings. This included elements of participatory action research, participant-observation, semi-structured and photo-elicited interviews, and group reflection. The data provided different opportunities to experience and evidence the teachers’ roles as capable experts. For example, the cross-talk behind the camera was notably rich. Techniques such as cognitive mapping also showed promise in highlighting the consistency and sophistication of their understandings.The pilot thus suggests that PV can provide different ways surface implicit understandings. We conclude by discussion some of the implications for research practice, participatory ethics and the opportunities to use PV within mixed methods approaches that have direct impact on policy and practice.

  • 5.
    High, Christopher
    et al.
    Open University, UK.
    Singh, Namita
    Open University, UK.
    Petheram, Lisa
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Nemes, Gusztav
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary.
    Defining participatory video from practice2012In: Handbook of Participatory Video / [ed] Elisabeth-Jane Milne, Claudia Mitchell & Naydene de Lange, Lanham, Maryland: AltaMira Press, 2012, p. 35-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Moore, Rhiannon
    et al.
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Buckler, Alison
    Open university, UK.
    Addae-Kyeremeh, Eric
    Open University, UK.
    Singh, Renu
    Young Lives, India.
    Rossiter, Jack
    University of Oxford, UK.
    High, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Understanding teachers' working experiences: Capturing data on teachers as professionals, learners and change-makers in low resource contexts2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When we picture a school, many of us will see a teacher, standing at the front of a classroom. When our children are at school, it’s their teachers we turn to with concerns. When we think back to our own school days, we think fondly about our favourite teachers, those who really stood out. Teachers have always been at the heart of education, at least in the popular imagination. It is particularly odd, then, that in much of the education research and policy discourse in low-income countries over the past 20 years teachers have been side-lined and presented as passive, generic (and often negative) inputs. While children’s engagement with education systems is increasingly framed in constructivist terms, with much attention given to the interrelation between their ideas and their experiences, these terms have been far less evident in research and policy around teachers’ engagement with these same systems.

    This is slowly changing, and for the first time global goals recognise the central role of teachers. We intend to use this blog post – and the UKFIET September 2017 symposium it links to – to acknowledge and critically consider this change, what it signifies and how our work can support and strengthen this recognition: What do we do when, as educational researchers, we want to learn more about teachers’ knowledge and experiences, and the roles they inhabit? What methodologies can expand our understanding of the working lives of teachers? To what extent should we include teachers in the design and analysis of these methodologies? What ethical considerations do we need to undertake and what logistical and empirical challenges might arise? And crucially, how can we try our hardest to ensure that data collected will support and empower the teachers we study?

  • 7.
    Nemes, Gusztav
    et al.
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    High, Christopher
    The Open University, UK.
    Old institutions, new challenges: the agricultural knowledge system in Hungary2013In: Studies in Agricultural Economics, ISSN 1418-2106, E-ISSN 2063-0476, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 76-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores and analyses the Hungarian institutional system for the creation and the transfer of knowledge in the field of agriculture and rural development. We consider the constitution and operation of the Agricultural Knowledge System (AKS)in Hungary, focussing on the formally organised aspects, and suggest that both the structure and content of the knowledge needed in the sector have significantly changed during the past decades. These changes, especially in relation to the sustainabilityof agriculture, pose significant challenges to traditional AKS institutions, which often have failed to change in line with the new requirements. Based on a literature review, interviews and a national stakeholder workshop, we offer an analysis of Hungarian AKS institutions, their co-ordination, co-operation and communication with each other and with Hungarian rurality,and of the arising issues and problems concerning the creation and the flow of knowledge needed for sustainable agriculture.We also briefly explore characteristics of emerging bottom-up structures, called LINSAS (learning and innovation networks for sustainable agriculture), and explore the significance of the findings in this article for the study of AKS in Europe. This article is based on preliminary results of the SOLINSA research project, supported by the European Union’s Seventh FrameworkProgramme.

  • 8.
    Nemes, Gusztav
    et al.
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    High, Christopher
    Open University, UK.
    Augustyn, Anna
    Beyond the New Rural Paradigm: Project state and collective reflexive agency2014In: Territorial Cohesion in Rural Europe: The Relational Turn in Rural Development / [ed] Andrew K. Copus and Philomena de Lima, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 212-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Petheram, Lisa
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    High, Christopher
    The Open University, UK.
    Campbell, Bruce
    CGIAR Challenge Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security, Denmark.
    Stacey, Natasha
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Lenses for learning: visual techniques in natural resource planning2011In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 92, no 10, p. 2734-2745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we explored the use of selected visual techniques (e.g. video, photography, diagramming) infacilitating learning among Indigenous communities living in remote protected areas at sites in Vietnam and Australia. The techniques were employed during interviews and workshops aimed at accessing and enhancing local peoples’ perspectives on their landscape and on specific natural resource management issues. The effectiveness of the different techniques for enabling learning varied markedly with the context, highlighting the need for facilitator skill and flexibility in application of techniques. Visual techniques helped to engage participants; encourage unrestrained and lateral thinking; provide opportunities for self-expression and reflection; and to expose participants to perspectives of other community members. Valuable insights emerged on broad aspects of learning and these were incorporatedinto a simple model that highlights three types of conceptualisation found to be important in these processes.

  • 10.
    Petheram, Lisa
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Stacey, Natasha
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Campbell, Bruce
    CGIAR Challenge Program on Climate Change, Denmark.
    High, Christopher
    Open University, UK.
    Using visual products derived from community research to inform natural resource management policy2012In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People living near remote protected areas seldom have their perspectives considered in decision-makingon conservation and development. A consequent challenge for researchers and practitioners is engagingwith policy-makers about local peoples’ perspectives, in ways that will capture their attention and influencethe decisions they make. Some authors claim that visual products have potential for providing sucha means, i.e. in communicating ‘local’ messages to policy-makers. In this study we used action researchto explore the use of visual products – derived from participatory community research – to communicatelocal perspectives to policy. Hypermedia DVDs, containing videos, photos, diagrams and text, were usedwith policy-stakeholders in interviews and group activities. Most participants reacted positively to theDVDs and indicated that visual products provided credible and valuable insight into findings, groundedin local knowledge. The main strength of the DVDs was to provide engaging messages, in a format thatallowed integration of knowledge co-constructed by local people and researchers. They were found tobe a versatile medium for use with a range of viewers with different needs, as well as a valuable platformto enhance discussion and understanding needed in developing sound policy in natural resourcemanagement. We also found the ‘processes’, used in creating DVDs and presenting them to policy-makersmarkedly influenced the effectiveness of visual products. We suggest that in working with broad and complexareas in NRM, these types of visual products have the best potential in shifting conceptual thinkingand generating ideas and awareness among policy-stakeholders, rather than as a means of recommendingspecific policy.

  • 11.
    Singh, Namita
    et al.
    Open University, UK.
    High, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. Open University, UK.
    Lane, Andy
    Open University, UK.
    Oreszczyn, Sue
    Open University, UK.
    Building agency through participatory video: Insights from the experiences of young women participants in India2017In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 173-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory video (PV) is being used by several nongovernment organizations (NGOs) in many different countries. It is often assumed to be a non-problematic process that enables less powerful groups to gain power and participate in social change. While scholars have for long critiqued participatory approaches, it is only in recent years that academic and professional debates that challenge assumptions about PV have emerged. This paper adds to those debates, while focusing primarily on critiquing the PV practice. Drawing on the concepts of participation, agency, and gender, it examines how the agency of less powerful groups can be affected over a period of time as they participate in PV projects initiated by NGOs. It discusses these issues through a case study of a long-term PV project done with young women in a community in Hyderabad (India), undertaken during a doctoral research. It draws attention to the several aspects of a long-term PV project that impact agency-development. The paper argues that while PV can enable participants to gain agency, it is equally challenging to do so in the presence of power relations.

1 - 11 of 11
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