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  • 1.
    Barnes, Susana
    et al.
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Palmer, Lisa
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    An East Timorese Domain Luca from Central and Peripheral Perspectives2017In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 173, no 2-3, p. 325-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The East Timorese kingdom Luca is described as the hegemon of the eastern parts of Timor in some nineteenth-century works. This is gainsaid by other data, which point to the existence of a multitude of petty kingdoms. This article scrutinizes Luca's claim to power from a number of angles, utilizing European records and contemporary anthropological fieldwork. First, we analyse the claims of the centre as reflected in colonial and indigenous narratives. Second, we investigate narratives from the 'periphery', that is, the minor adjacent domains of Vessoro and Babulo. Third, we offer a comprehensive discussion of Luca's role from a wider geographical perspective. In this way we produce a 'general account' that situates the symbolic and historical significance of Luca within the Timorese understanding of time, ritual, and power.

  • 2.
    Hagerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Candrasangkala: The Balinese Art of Dating Events2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study is concerned with the historiography of the Island of Bali, Indonesia. It has long been recognized that the chronicle texts (babad) of Bali are unreliable as conventional historical sources; they have a strongly legitimizing purpose and are arranged according to other criterions than strictly chronological ones. Precise dates are rarely found in the ordinary texts. There is, however, a category of texts that furnishes annal-like information, with years set out in the form of chronograms (candrasangkala). In this study a number of such lists of dates have been published, translated and commented. Comparing the dates with external, mostly Dutch, materials, it is apparent that they display a degree of reliability from at least the late sixteenth century. The early dates would generally seem to be fictitious, but are interesting as culturally constructed imaginations of history and geography.

  • 3.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    A Note on Ade.2007In: Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, Vol. 163, no 4, p. 556-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A short article that discusses the elusive East Timorese geographical name Ade, which occurs in many early modern colonial accounts. The article is a reaction to another study by Andrew McWilliam that previously appeared in the same journal (163:1, 2007). A Dutch travel account from 1665 provides hitherto unknown details about the location and features of Ade, which was a region on the north coast that included the modern town Vemasse.

  • 4.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    A Prince in a Republic. The Life of Sultan Hamengku Buwono IX of Yogyakarta, written by John Monfries2015In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 171, no 4, p. 590-592Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The review scrutinizes John Monfries's biography of the Javanese prince and politician Hamengku Buwono IX, who was a hero of the Indonesian Revolution and later served as vice president of Indonesia. The book is lauded for its meticulous research and contextualization of the sultan, but criticized for providing a scanty analysis of the sultan as a person.

  • 5.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    A Solitary Crocodile?: Timorese Inter-Island Connections in the Early Modern Era.2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of inter-island connections in the Timor region in the early colonial period (c. 1600-1800), outside the control of the colonial establishments (the Dutch East Indies Company, the Portuguese Estado da Índia).

  • 6.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Bali in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.: Suggestions for a Chronology of the Gelgel Period.1995In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 151, no 1, p. 101-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article studies the sources for the Gelgel kingdom ob Bali, Indonesia, which is the subject of much uncertainty and controversy. The author collates Iberian and Dutch archival sources with categories of Balinese historiography, and arrives at conclusions at variance with a previous study by Dr. Helen Creese.

  • 7.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Balthazar : Un prince de Timor en Chine, en Amérique et en Europe au XVIIIe siècle2017In: Archipel, ISSN 0044-8613, E-ISSN 2104-3655, Vol. 93, p. 231-232Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Beyond Bali. Subaltern Citizens and Post-Colonial Intimacy2017In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 140-141Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Book reviews: Susan Legêne, Bambang Purwanto, and Henk Schulte Nordholt (eds), Sites, bodies and stories; Imagining Indonesian history. Singapore: NUS Press, 2015, 312 pp. ISBN 978-9971-69-857-7. Price: USD 38 (paperback).2016In: Wacana, ISSN 1411-2272, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 142-144Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Britain and Sihanouk's Cambodia2016In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 172, no 1, p. 152-153Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Cannibals and pedlars.: Economic opportunities and political alliance in Alor, 1600-1850.2010In: Indonesia and the Malay World, ISSN 1363-9811, E-ISSN 1469-8382, Vol. 38, no 111, p. 217-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A historical study of the Alor Islands in eastern Indonesia during the period 1600-1850. The article discusses the perceptions of geography and ethnographic features by foreign visitors, and the Alorese relations to the outside world, in particular with the Dutch and Portuguese colonials.

  • 12.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    China and Otherness.: Abel Rémusat and the French Roots of Sinology.2000Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A text intended for advanced students, discussing the paradigm of sinology in the 19th and 20th centuries. The text follows the intellectual tradition of European China studies begun by scholars such as Abel Rémusat in the first half of the 19th century, and investigates the way that the paradigm was challenged by new lines of scholarly approach in the post-WW II period.

  • 13.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Lunds universitet.
    China and Said1996In: IIAS Newsletter, no December, p. 31-32Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A reflection on the relevance for the postcolonial Said debate for the study of Chinese civilization.

  • 14.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Colonial or Indigenous Rule?: The Black Portuguese of Timor in the 17th and 18th Centuries.2007In: IIAS Newsletter, Vol. 44Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief study of the Portuguese mestizo population in the Timor region which enjoyed a prime regional political importance during much of the 17th and 18th centuries. The article discusses factors conducive to their rise and subsequent decline as a political factor, and whether the preponerance of the mestizos can be seen as a "colonial" rule in a meaningful sense.

  • 15.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    'Colonial rivalry and the partition of Timor'2006In: IIAS Newsletter, Vol. 40, p. 16-Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article asks the basic question, how the Dutch East Indies Company (VOC) was unable to dislodge its long-time colonial enemy Portugal from the Timor area in the 17th century. It is shown how early Portuguese enterprises on this Southeast Asian island were able to achieve a degree of local recognition and even localization, especially with regard to the ethnically mixed 'Black Portuguese'. The serious Dutch efforts, on the other hand, came to late to overcome the Portuguese network. After the Dutch-Portuguese peace in 1663, the two powers resorted to warfare by proxy. A major reshuffle in 1749 seemed to forebode the fall of the Portuguese positions on Timor, but the Dutch were once again unable to efficiently bind indigenous polities to their cause. Eventually, this resulted in the rough 50-50 division of Timor found on the political map still today.

  • 16.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Contesting colonialisms, contested stories: early intrusion in East Timor through Portuguese and Dutch eyes2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial phase of Portuguese political domination over East Timor, occurring more or less in the seventeenth century, is relatively ill chronicled. The official Goa-based Estado da Índia was not steadily established on Timor until 1702. The Portuguese letters and reports preserved for posterity only present a fragmented picture of the process, and much of the story depends on chronicular texts authored by the Dominican missionaries. Nevertheless, the scattered material at hand has inspired a series of Portuguese historians since the late nineteenth century to produce scholarly syntheses of the early colonial intrusion, most notably Affonso de Castro (1867), Humberto Leitão (1948) and Artur Teodoro de Matos (1974). Thes eaccounts tend to emphasize Portuguese agency, while the interplay with the Dutch East India Company(VOC) and indigenous polities remains comparatively vague. To a large extent this style of historiography is due to the nature of the source material, although the political discourses of pre-1974 Portugal obviously played a role, too. The present study surveys and evaluates the picture of the early colonial phase provided by Portuguese materials, and confronts it with the resources offered by the VOC archives, issued and preserved on a regular basis. The paper discusses how the two colonial funds of knowledge reflect the mutual rivalry of the Estado and the VOC; but also how they can expand our knowledge of early Timorese society when read in concert and thus avoid the image of Timor as merely the arena for competing colonialisms.

  • 17.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Cycles of Queenship on Timor: A response to Douglas Kammen2013In: Archipel, ISSN 0044-8613, E-ISSN 2104-3655, no 85, p. 237-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article is a rejoinder to Douglas Kammen recent study "Queens of Timor" (Archipel 84, 2012). Studying the numerous small polities ("kingdoms") of Portuguese Timor, Kammen found a remarkable upsurge of female rulers in the nineteenth century, explained through the interplay between house, kingdom and colonial administration. However, the occurrence of female rule before 1800 is not as rare as suggested by Kammen. On the contrary, the available contemporary (Dutch and Portuguese) archival sources reveal a cyclical pattern of reigning queens. While almost no women in power are attested for the eighteenth century, there are at least eleven such cases on Timor and the adjacent islands in the period 1640-1700, that is, from the time when detailed documentation on Timor starts. Some of these queens owed their position to inheritance while others were widow-rulers. On average they appear personally active to a higher degree than the nineteenth century counterparts. The article discusses Timorese queenship in relation to the upsurge of female rule found in Aceh, Patani, and so on, in the same period. Like in these areas, the discontinuation of female rule on Timor after 1700 might be connected to external forces, in this case the new networks forged by European authorities.

  • 18.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Dagar i Delhi2015In: HumaNetten, ISSN 1403-2279, Vol. 35, p. 23-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En dagboksrapport från en svensk universitetsdelegations resa till Indien.

    Skildring av en resa med en akademisk delegation från Linnéuniversitetet till Indien 2015 med diverse kulturhistoriska notiser.

  • 19.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    David F. Vukovich, China and Orientalism : Western Knowledge Production and the P.R.C.: London and New York : Routledge, 2012; xviii + 185 pp. with notes, bibliography, and index : 9780415592208, £80.00 (hbk)2014In: China Information, ISSN 0920-203X, E-ISSN 1741-590X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 96-98Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    David W. P. Elliott, Changing Worlds : Vietnam’s Transition from Cold War to Globalization2013In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 169, no 4, p. 535-537Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of a work that details the changes in political intent in Vietnam in the post-1975 era, focusing on the years 1989-2006. The review lauds the work for its massive research, but questions the lack of a broader context.

  • 21.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities. Historia.
    Den Andres röst?: Att läsa kolonialismen från den koloniserades synpunkt2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussion om möjligheterna att spåra inhemska historiska processer och förhållanden utifrån ett kolonialt stoff, med exempel från den nederländska koloniala utposten Kupang (Västtimor, Indonesien).

  • 22.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Döden på värdshuset.: Mordet på riksdagsmannen Jon Bengtsson.2010In: Småländska brott.: Brott och straff i Småland under 500 år. / [ed] Lennart Johansson, Roddy Nilsson & Håkan Nordmark, Växjö: Historiska föreningen i Kronobergs län , 2010, 1, p. 122-135Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln beskriver mordet på riksdagsmannen Jon Bengtsson i Nöbbele i Kronobergs län år 1797. Bakgrunden till händelsen studeras. Vidare analyseras det postuma intryck Jon Bengtsson och hans våldsamma död gjorde i senare folktradition.

  • 23.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Eastern Indonesia and the Writing of History: [L’Est indonésien et l’écriture de l’histoire]2015In: Archipel, ISSN 0044-8613, E-ISSN 2104-3655, Vol. 90, p. 75-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article is a discussion of the proliferation of history-writing about eastern Indonesia (mainly Nusa Tenggara, Maluku and Papua) and Timor-Leste during the last decades. While a substantial corpus of Portuguese historical writings on Timor-Leste appeared up to the 1970s, very little was done in respect to eastern Indonesia, at any rate after decolonization. However, a number of anthropologists have included studies of historical data in their work since the 1970s. The challenges from anthropology have contributed to a new output of historical research since the 1990s. The possibilities of the colonial archive to yield social and cultural data have been tested. Not least, the independence of Timor-Leste in 1999-2002 has been a catalyst for fresh studies. The article presents an overview of the themes and methodologies taken up since the late 20th century in works written in English, Dutch, Portuguese, French, German, and Indonesian. It is emphasized that a historian working in this area must take account of the resources of the colonial archive, as well as to alternative claims to the past – oral tradition, linguistics, heritage objects, and so on. In traditionally non-literate and small-scale societies, analyses of concurrent versions of history will be crucial in the mapping of the past.

  • 24.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities. Historia.
    Ernst van Veen and Leonard Blussé, Rivalry and conflict; European traders and Asian trading networks in the 16th and 17th centuries.2007In: Bijdragen tot de Taal-, land- en Volkenkunde, Vol. 163, no 1, p. 167-168Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Review of an anthology about Dutch and Portuguese interests and rivalries in Asia during the early modern period. The review acknowledges the value of the various contributions of the book, but asks for a more theoretically grounded approach to the issue of overseas history.

  • 25.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Ett asiatiskt produktionssätt?: Nya forskningsrön om bondeekonomi och statsmakt i Sydöstasien.1994In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 5-23Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En studie rörande folkliga motståndsrörelser i Sydöstasien i premodern tid.

  • 26.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    European Associan for South-East Asian Studies (EuroSEAS) sjätte konferens, Göteborg, 26-28 augusti 2010.2010In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 4, p. 827-828Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapport om en Sydöstasienkonferens i Göteborg, augusti 2010.

  • 27.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Expansion and internalization of modes of warfare in pre-colonial Bali2018In: Warring Societies of Pre-colonial Southeast Asia: Local Cultures of Conflict Within a Regional Context / [ed] Michael W. Charney, Kathryn Wellen, Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2018, p. 129-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the fifteen or so polities of some consequence in early-modern insular Southeast Asia, Bali was unique in being non-Muslim. While no full explanation for this fact has been offered so far, it is at a minimum clear that the Balinese developed military skills which made them well-known even outside their modest-sized island. Balinese modes of warfare over the centuries can be followed sketchily from archival materials, in the first hand Dutch sources. External views are also offered by Javanese, Sasak and Sumbawan sources. Balinese historical traditions are obsessed with warfare, although the relatively late and stereotypical portrayals of war offer problems in interpretation. What is clear from the extant records is that the period 1500-1800 included periods of strong military expansion which was able to temporarily hold back major central polities such as Mataram. This can be attributed to both internal dynamics, such as political and demographic conditions, and external factors such as the vacuum created by the defeat of several Muslim polities at the hands of the VOC. From the second half of the 18th century Balinese warfare tended to be internalized as the area of activity of the Balinese was confined to Bali itself (together with the previously subdued Lombok). Internal warfare tended to grow more intense towards the late 19th century, paving the way for the definite colonial subjugation in 1906-08. The essay traces the changes in the mode of warfare over a period of about 400 years, relating it to technological and political developments in the Southeast Asian neighbourhood region.

  • 28.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Expansion in the shadow of the Company: Concurrent representations of Karangasem2016In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 172, no 2/3, p. 279-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is the political expansion of Karangasem, one of the microstates of Bali, in the second half of the eighteenth century. The Karangasem leadership was able to expand into Lombok and large parts of northern and central Bali, while generally avoiding confrontation with the Dutch East India Company. They encountered a range of ethnic groups and endeavoured to play out the Dutch and the British interests against each other. In spite of its regional importance, prior to 1800 Karangasem is poorly documented. The article explores ways of reading different categories of European and indigenous sources against each other. Although fragmentary, they yield information about strategic concerns, economic underpinnings of expansion, ethnicity, and cultural and ritual issues. A combination of internal and external factors, including Dutch policies in the East Indies, enabled Karangasem to pursue a successful political expansion in the shadow of the Company.

  • 29.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Lund University.
    From Batuparang to Ayudhya.: Bali and the Outside World 1636-1656.1998In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 154, no 1, p. 55-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article contains an in-depth study of the Balinese kingdom of Gelgel and its relations with external polities in the mid 17th century. These included Siam, the VOC, Lombok, Makassar, and Mataram on Java. The study is based on unpublished Dutch and Balinese materials, and suggests a degree of interest among the Balinese elite for economic and political contacts, which have hitherto been overlooked by historical research.

  • 30.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Globalhistoria2015In: Perspektiv på historia: En introduktion till historiestudier / [ed] Henrik Ågren, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 205-221Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Goter på drift: reflektioner kring ett försvunnet monument2014In: HumaNetten, ISSN 1403-2279, Vol. 33, p. 27-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The article departs from the 18th century engravings by Ménestrier and Banduri which allegedly represent the reliefs found on a triumphal column in Constantinople - either that of Theodosius the Great or his son Arcadius. The reliefs depict a Roman triumphal procession with barbarian, presumably Gothic prisoners. The historical background of the late 4th-century Roman-Gothic confrontations is summarized, and the issue of the authencity of the engravings is discussed.

  • 32.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Lund University.
    ”Hanky-panky Chinese doing hanky-panky business”: De etniska kinesernas situation i dagens Indonesien2002In: Tid och tillit.: En vänbok till Eva Österberg. / [ed] Andersson, Irene, Johansson, Kenneth, & Lindstedt Cronberg, Marie, Stockholm: Atlantis , 2002, 1, p. 223-244Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln analyserar de integrationsproblem och etniska motsättningar som föreligger i dagens Indonesien rörande de etniska kineserna, vilka har en ekonomiskt stark men politiskt utsatt position.

  • 33.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Held's History of Sumbawa: An Annotated Translation2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a translation from Dutch to English of an unpublished synthesis about the history of Sumbawa, an island in Indonesia. The original manuscript was written by the Indologist and anthropologist Gerrit Jan Held (1906-1955). The editor has added a long introduction and extensive annotations.

  • 34.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Hindu Rulers, Muslim Subjects.: Lombok and Bali in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries2001 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book covers the history of the Muslim Sasak people of Lombok and their relation to Bali and the Hindu Balinese from the late 17th century to c. 1750. The various phases of Balinese penetration on Lombok are followed through a critical study of archival Dutch records and indigenous Balinese and Sasak traditions. The localized setting of Islam, and its consequences for the acceptance of Baline rule, are analyzed.

  • 35.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Historia från undersidan?: Tidigmoderna ostindiska kolonialarkiv och socialhistoriska möjligheter2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussion om arkivmaterial rörande Nederländska Ostindiens historia under VOC-perioden, med exempel från östra delen av Indonesien. Texten nämner behovet av att bedriva en arkivens etnografi, och att komma runt den nationella och eurocentriska grundsyftning som betingar det koloniala arkivet.

  • 36.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Historiebruk i öst och väst.: Reflektioner kring historieskapande i kinesisk och europeisk tradition.2010In: Kinarapport, ISSN 0345-5807, no 4, p. 17-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the contrasts between Chinese and Western uses of history, from earliest times up to the 19th century. Five categories of such uses are scrutinized in order to capture the historiographical processes of the respective civilizations.

  • 37.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    'Introduction'2011In: Tradition, Identity, and History-making in Eastern Indonesia / [ed] Hans Hägerdal, Växjö & Kalmar: Linnaeus University Press , 2011, 1, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction to a series of essays by historians, ethographers and anthrolpologists about tradition and history in eastern Indonesia and Timor Leste.

  • 38.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Introduction: New Paths of Colonial History2009In: Responding to the West: Essays on Colonial Domination and Asian Agency, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press , 2009, 1, p. 9-15Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    An introduction to the essays of the edited volume, putting the studies in context of the academic field(s) of colonial studies.

  • 39.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Island hopping: Religion, rejection, and cultural adaptation in official travel accounts from the VOC period2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Kina – en historisk exposé genom fyra millennier.2010In: Kinarapport, ISSN 0345-5807, no 4, p. 4-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A brief survey of Chinese history, from the earliest times to the People's Republic.

  • 41.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kina och Vietnam: Den större och mindre draken2015In: Kinarapport, ISSN 1404-1855, no 4, p. 46-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En diskussion om de politiska och kulturella relationerna mellan Kina och Vietnam sedan forntiden fram till idag.

  • 42.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities. Historia.
    Kinas historia2008Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Boken är en populärvetenskaplig syntes över Kinas historia från stenålder till nutid. Ungefär halva boken behandlar historien före 1800, resten efter 1800. Tonvikten ligger på politisk och socioekonomisk historia.

  • 43.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Kinas ledare 1912-20122012Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    När det kinesiska kejsardömet störtades för 100 år sedan inleddes det moderna Kinas historia. Men förhoppningar om en ljusnande framtid grusades snabbt, och i stället för modernisering följde inbördeskrig, invasioner och en rad auktoritära regimer.I Kinas ledare berättar historikern Hans Hägerdal om det stora landets förvandling från kejsardöme, via totalitär stat, till dagens anonyma ledarskap. Skildringen fokuserar på ledargestalterna och ger en fascinerande inblick i deras liv bakom kulisserna.Kinas ledare tar avstamp i xinhai-revolutionen 1911 12 och berättar om Kinas ledande politiker i ett ideologiskt och samhälleligt sammanhang fram till våra dagar. Frågan om vilka avtryck enskilda personligheter egentligen har gjort på Kinas moderna historia kan naturligtvis inte besvaras entydigt, man kan på goda grunder anta att Kina skapat sina ledare snarare än tvärtom. De rådande ideologiska och politiska strukturerna bäddade sannolikt för den ofta despotiska och hänsynslösa ledarstil som förekommit i Kina i hundra år.Boken belyser utförligt den återgång till militärt auktoritetsvälde som följde efter revolutionen och berättar om hur Kina splittrades upp mellan en mängd krigsherrar efter 1916. Som en följd av japanska påtryckningar under och efter första världskriget grundade Sun Yat-sen nationalistpartiet Guomindang, som först enade stora delar av Kina. Men efter några år utbröt en långdragen och bitvis brutal kamp mellan nationalisterna och det nybildade kommunistpartiet. Den japanska invasionen 1937 45 försvagade Guomindangregimen och ledde till att kommunistpartiet segrade 1949. På 1950-talet omvandlades Kinas snabbt i riktning mot en totalitär stat med Mao Zedong som ledare och partiordförande. Författaren beskriver och diskuterar Maos sätt att fungera som ledare. Efter ett delvis turbulent styre i 27 år ersattes Mao i slutet av 1970-talet av den pragmatiske men auktoritäre Deng Xiaoping, vars reformer i grunden ändrade Kinas ekonomiska strukturer.

  • 44.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Konkubinen blev Kinas kejsarinna2011In: Populär historia, ISSN 1102-0822, no 8, p. 46-52Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Populärvetenskaplig artikel om den kinesiska regerande änkekejsarinnan Cixi, död 1908, hennes liv och gärning.

  • 45.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kulturens färdvägar2014In: En samtidig världshistoria / [ed] Maria Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2014, 1, p. 410-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textbook chapter intended for universities and colleges, about the history of the Pacific region (eastern Asia, Oceania, Pacific South America) in the period 500-1500.

  • 46.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    K.W. Taylor, A History of the Vietnamese2014In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 170, no 2-3, p. 413-415Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Lay Atjien Liok and the Lidak War of 1852: Chinese networking, indigenous agency and colonial intrusion in eastern Indonesia2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The conference paper studies the circumstances of a Timorese case of resistance against Dutch colonial rule in 1852-57, the Lidak War. It is pointed out how indigenous political mobilization in combination with influence from Overseas Chinese traders was able to keep the Dutch on the defence for several years, and how this was commemorated in the local collective memory.

  • 48.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lay Atjien Liok and the Lidak War of 1852: Chinese networking, indigenous agency and colonial intrusion in eastern Indonesia2013In: Indonesia and the Malay World, ISSN 1363-9811, E-ISSN 1469-8382, Vol. 41, no 121, p. 322-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the agency of overseas Chinese and indigenous polities in a part of Dutch East India (present-day Indonesia) in the 1850s. The study focuses on the Lidak War that broke out in 1857 and scrutinizes the place of the Dutch colonials in the local and regional context in terms of status and administrative significance.

  • 49.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lengser kaprabon: Auktoritet, makt och auktoritärism i det moderna Indonesien2018In: Auktoritet / [ed] Mats Trondman, Malin Lennartsson, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2018, p. 167-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet diskuterar politisk auktoritet i det moderna Indonesien (sedan 1949), i huvudsak under Sukarno- och Soehartoerorna fram till 1998. Traditionella föreställningars roll analyseras gentemot reella sociala och maktpolitiska förhållanden.

  • 50.
    Hägerdal, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Lords of the land, lords of the sea: Conflict and adaptation in early colonial Timor, 1600-1800.2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European traders and soldiers established a foothold on Timor in the course of the seventeenth century, motivated by the quest for the commercially vital sandalwood and the intense competition between the Dutch and the Portuguese. Lords of the land, lords of the sea focuses on two centuries of contacts between the indigenous polities on Timor and the early colonials, and covers the period 1600-1800. In contrast with most previous studies, the book treats Timor as a historical region in its own right, using a wide array of Dutch, Portuguese and other original sources, which are compared with the comprehensive corpus of oral tradition recorded on the island. From this rich material, a lively picture emerges of life and death in early Timorese society, the forms of trade, slavery, warfare, alliances, social life, and so forth. The investigation demonstrates that the European groups, although having a role as ordering political forces, were only part of the political landscape of Timor. They relied on alliances where the distinction between ally and vassal was moot, and led to frequent conflicts and uprisings. During a slow and complicated process, the often turbulent political conditions involving Europeans, Eurasians, and Timorese polities, paved the way for the later division of Timor into two spheres of roughly equal size.

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