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  • 1.
    Ekelin, Annelie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Winter, Jeff
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Collaborative creation of trust through local media innovation2020In: Presented at PRAGUE MEDIA POINT – a virtual conference for journalists, media professionals, and scholars on December 1-11, 2020  with workshops on December 12, 2020, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The local press enjoyed remarkable levels of public trust throughout the 20th century, but no longer. The Regpress 2 - Project presented in this session deepens knowledge about the environment in which the regional press operates. It also provides applied research for the regional press, which faces the challenge of becoming leaner and more competitive while maintaining its presupposed role as a reliable “trust anchor.“ What is the relationship between regional media and local citizens? What are the expectations of the press to be part of community life? How to remain relevant and make it happen with limited resources? Find out what answers the Regpress 2 -project has to these questions and more.

  • 2.
    Eriksén, Sara
    et al.
    Blekinge tekniska högskola.
    Ekelin, Annelie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    Blekinge tekniska högskola.
    Dittrich, Yvonne
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hansson, Christina
    Blekinge tekniska högskola.
    Winter, Jeff
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    What Have We Learned from the TANGO Arena for Regional Cooperation Around e-Government in Southern Sweden?2004In: Electronic Government: Third International Conference, EGOV 2004, Zaragoza, Spain, August 30-September 3, 2004. Proceedings / [ed] Roland Traunmüller, Springer: Springer, 2004, p. 156-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The TANGO e-government arena is a project in Southern Sweden, funded by the Innovative Actions of the European Regional Development Fund. The project is now nearing its end, and we are thus at the stage of reflectively reviewing what has actually been accomplished and how this relates to the original goals of the project. In July 2002, when the project began, the aim was to establish cooperation between the public sector, private enterprise and university-based research in designing public e-services. In cooperating around development of new, integrated services, catering to various categories of users as well as to a growing diversity of mobile technologies, we have aimed towards establishing feedback channels between practice and theory, between use and design, and between different academic disciplines where we see a need to synchronize the models and methods we work with. Our research questions have focused on exploring and managing multi-perspectivity as a resource for design. In this paper we look at how we organized our cooperation around these goals, and attempt to address those basic summing-up-the-project questions; How well have we succeeded? What have we learned in the process?

  • 3.
    Winter, Jeff
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    The Rocky Road: Why Usability Work is so Difficult2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving product and process quality are among the central themes of software engineering, and quality is an important factor in the marketplace. Usability and user experience (UX) are two important aspects of quality, particularly for interactive products. To achieve usability means producing products that let users do things in a satisfactory, efficient and effective way. To develop products with good UX, means going beyond usability, in ways that are still not clear to us. Achieving good usability and UX is hard. This thesis is concerned with organizations which work towards these goals. This research is concerned with understanding and improving the processes by which technology is designed and developed, and understanding the demands and expectations users have. It is about how companies can and actually develop products with good usability and UX, and what stops them from working towards this as efficiently as they could. We have viewed the usability and UX challenge from the viewpoints of Quality, Organizations, and Institutions, with a focus on participatory design, user-centred design and wicked problems. The research can be characterised as empirical research performed over a period of seven years, in close cooperation with industrial partners. The research was performed using multiple data collection methods to create constructs and shape theory. The field methods have ranged from being a participant observer, to performing interviews and holding workshops with members of the participating organisations. A case study approach was initially used, but focus soon moved from case study methodology to a closer focus on grounded theory, and finally the focus shifted to constructivist grounded theory. The thesis contributes to the field of software engineering in several ways. Usability has a long history within software engineering, human computer interaction, and design science, but the different discourses within the fields have meant that communication between the fields was problematic. The research in this thesis has moved between the different fields, contributing to bridging the gap between the areas. It gives an illustration of how usability work actually takes place in different types of companies, from a developer of operating systems for smartphones, to a global engineering company, which knows that it must find ways of working with, and measuring, usability and user experience. It gives concrete knowledge about the way in which companies can work with usability testing, and how they can provide information to satisfy the information needs of different stakeholders. It provides a discussion of the state of UX today, taking up the problems that stop industry making use of the definitions and theories of UX that exist. Thus, it gives an illustration of the different factors in product design, development and sales, from dealing with organizational factors to satisfying user needs, that all make usability work such a rocky road to navigate.

  • 4.
    Winter, Jeff
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Hinely, Mark
    UIQ Technology AB.
    Examining Correlations in Usability Data to Effectivize Usability Testing2011In: e-Informatica Software Engineering Journal, ISSN 1897-7979, E-ISSN 2084-4840, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a case study performed in industry, this work deals with a statistical analysis of data collected during usability testing. The data is from tests performed by usability testers from two companies in two different countries. One problem in the industrial situation is the scarcity of testing resources, and a need to use these resources in the most efficient way. Therefore, the data from the testing is analysed to see whether it is possible to measure usability on the basis of one single metric, and whether it is possible to judge usability problems on the basis of the distribution of use case completion times. This would allow test leaders to concentrate on situations where there are obvious problems. We find that it is not possible to measure usability through the use of one metric, but that it may be possible to gain indications of usability problems on the basis of an analysis of time taken to perform use cases. This knowledge would allow the collection of usability data from distributed user groups, and a more efficient use of scarce testing resources.

  • 5.
    Winter, Jeff
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Rönkkö, Kari
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    SPI success factors within product usability evaluation2010In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 83, no 11, p. 2059-2072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an experience report where we compare 8 years of experience of product related usability testing and evaluation with principles for software process improvement (SPI). In theory the product and the process views are often seen to be complementary, but studies of industry have demonstrated the opposite. Therefore, more empirical studies are needed to understand and improve the present situation. We find areas of close agreement as well as areas where our work illuminates new characteristics. It has been identified that successful SPI is dependent upon being successfully combined with a business orientation. Usability and business orientation also have strong connections although this has not been extensively addressed in SPI publications. Reasons for this could be that usability focuses on product metrics whilst today's SPI mainly focuses on process metrics. Also because today's SPI is dominated by striving towards a standardized, controllable, and predictable software engineering process; whilst successful usability efforts in organisations are more about creating a creative organisational culture advocating a useful product throughout the development and product life cycle. We provide a study and discussion that supports future development when combining usability and product focus with SPI, in particular if these efforts are related to usability process improvement efforts.

  • 6.
    Winter, Jeff
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Rönkkö, Kari
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Rissanen, Mikko
    ABB Corporate Research.
    Identifying organizational barriers: A case study of usability work when developing software in the automation industry2014In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 88, p. 54-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates connections between usability efforts and organizational factors. This is an important field of research which so far appears to be insufficiently studied and discussed. It illustrates problems when working with software engineering tasks and usability requirements. It deals with a large company that manufactures industrial robots with an advanced user interface, which wanted to introduce usability KPIs, to improve product quality. The situation in the company makes this difficult, due to a combination of organizational and behavioural factors that led to a “wicked problem” that caused conflicts, breakdowns and barriers. Addressing these problems requires a holistic view that places context in the foreground and technological solutions in the background. Developing the right product requires communication and collaboration between multiple stakeholders. The inclusion of end users, who fully understand their own work context, is vital. Achieving this is dependent on organizational change, and management commitment. One step to beginning this change process may be through studying ways to introduce user-centred design processes.

  • 7.
    Winter, Jeff
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Sharp, Linda
    Maskinteknik i Oskarshamn AB.
    Teaching PD: Learning from a Small Industrial Project2016In: Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Interactive Exhibitions, Workshops - Volume 2, New York: ACM Press, 2016, p. 33-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we reflect on teaching PD, in an experience report of a student project taking place in an industrial context. The paper contributes to discussions in the PD community about how PD is, and could be, taught. It looks at what happened in the project, and issues that arose, from the point of view of the students and the company. It looks at the way in which uncertainty and power relations have played a role in the project, and how the students have been affected by them. It discusses the importance of the co-design that took place, mainly around prototyping, and the difficulties students experienced when working with PD methods. It looks at the importance of the roles involved in the project. We end with important points for discussion concerning teaching PD.

  • 8.
    Wohlin, Claes
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Aybuke, Aurum
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Lefteris, Angelis
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Phillips, Laura
    Macquarie Group, Australia.
    Dittrich, Yvonne
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gorscheck, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Grahn, Håkan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Henningson, Kennet
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Kågström, Simon
    Net Insight AB.
    Low, Graham
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Rovegård, Per
    Factor10.
    Tomaszewski, Piotr
    ST-Ericsson.
    van Toorn, Christine
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Winter, Jeff
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    The success factors powering industry-academia collaboration2011In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration between industry and academia supports improvement and innovation in industry and helps to ensure industrial relevance in academic research. This article presents an exploratory study of the factors for successful collaboration between industry and academia in software research.

1 - 8 of 8
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