lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahnesjö, Jonas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Recreational fishing in an educational intervention context promotes awareness and knowledge about nature in schoolchildren2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor activities may be intuitively associated with interest for nature and environmental concern. However, most scientific studies suggest that no such correlation exists. In this quantitative study we have used a questionnaire and explored the hypothesis that a one day educational intervention may be a successful tool in increasing environmental awareness, interest for nature and interest for recreational fishing. We present evidence suggesting that educational interventions in which young people are exposed to natural environments in a recreational fishing context have positive effects on interest for nature and recreational fishing, knowledge about nature and environmental awareness. Our findings also reveal that frequency of nature visits does not correlate with self estimated interest for nature.  We also show that the observed effects of the educational intervention “Klassdraget” appear to be larger for the girls which are, by tradition, less interested in recreational fishing as compared to boys.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Mats
    Barometern.
    Bergman, Patrick (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital.
    Kompressionskläder ger ingen medicinsk effekt2018In: Barometern, ISSN 1103-906X, no September, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Elitmotionärens vardag - familjeliv, tidspussel och extremidrott2016In: Idrottsforskning, E-ISSN 2002-3944, no 18 majArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att kombinera vardagen som elitmotionär med ett fungerande familjeliv är ingen enkel ekvation. Uppoffringar, glädje, dåligt samvete och glada hejarop är en del av vardagen. Men på vems villkor och bekostnad formas egentligen elitmotionärens livsstil?

  • 4.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Becoming an Ironman triathlete: Extreme exercise, gender equality and the family puzzle2018In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1351-1363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from a qualitative research approach, this article focuses on Swedish amateur Ironman triathletes and their family life. The purpose of the paper is to investigate how an elite amateur lifestyle is upheld and balanced with the demands of a sustainable family and social life. The results indicate that the process of becoming and staying an Ironman creates tensions in intimate relationships, making it hard to bring the family life puzzle together. Although the participants interviewed often talk about family life in terms of sharing things fairly equally, in terms of gender equity and involved parenthood, this seemingly is not always an easy ideal to fulfil in practice. On a broader cultural level, these findings can thus be contextualized in relation to discourses associated with the gendering of families and functions, and, of course, the gender of sport and performance.

  • 5.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    A two-peaked increase of serum myosin heavy chain-α after full distance triathlon demonstrates heart muscle cell death2017In: Clinical Research in Cardiology, ISSN 1861-0684, E-ISSN 1861-0692, Vol. 106, no Suppl 1, article id P1159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an ongoing debate about the significance of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) elevation after strenuous exercise: heart muscle cell death versus physiologic mechanism of release through an intact cell membrane. While cTnT is a small molecule (37 kDa), cardiac specific myosin heavy chain-alpha (MHC-α) is much larger (224 kDa) and an increase after exercise could hardly be explained by passage through an intact cardiac cell membrane. PURPOSE: To measure MHC-α, and other biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP); cTnT, creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin (MG), creatinine (C), and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) before and after a full distance Ironman in order to answer the question of heart muscle cell death versus physiologic changes. 

    Methods: In 52 non-elite athletes (14 female, 38 male; age 41.1 ± 9.7, range 24-70 years; all completed the race) biomarkers were measured by standard laboratory methods 7 days before, directly after, and day 1, 4 and 6 after the race. MHC-α was measured with a commercially available ELISA with no cross reactivity with other myosins. 

    Results: The course of MHC-α concentration [µg/L] was 1.33 ± 0.53 (before), 2.57 ± 0.78 (directly after), 1.51 ± 0.53 (day 1), 2.74 ± 0.55 (day 4) and 1.83 ± 0.76 (day 6). Other biomarkers showed a one-peaked increase with maximal values either directly after the race or at day 1: cTnT 76 ± 80 ng/L (12-440; reference <15), NT-proBNP 776 ± 684 ng/L (92-4700; ref. < 300), CK 68 ± 55 µkat/L (5-280; ref. < 1.9), MG 2088 ± 2350 µg/L (130-17000; ref.< 72), and creatinine 100 ± 20 µmol/L (74-161; ref. < 100), CRP 49 ± 23 mg/L (15-119; ref.< 5). There was a significant correlation between MHC-α and NT-proBNP (R=0.48; p<0.001) but neither between MHC-α and cTnT (R=0.13; p=0.36) nor MHC-α and myoglobin (R=0.18; p=0.2). 

    Conclusion: An Ironman leads to remarkable disturbances in biomarkers as e.g. cTnT was in the range of myocardial infarction in 100% of women and 97% of men. This is to our best knowledge the first investigation of MHC-α after strenuous exercise and its two-peaked increase most likely represents first release from the cytosolic pool and later from cell necrosis including the contractile apparatus. However, many questions remain, not at least why MHC-α baseline levels are as high as 1.33 ± 0.53 µg/L. 

  • 6.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Two-peaked increase of serum myosin heavy chain-α after Ironman demonstrates heart muscle cell death2017In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 47, no 5 Supplement 1, p. 186-, article id 734Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ragnarsson, Thony
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Increase of biomarkers after the Kalmar Ironman in male and female non-elite triathletes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strenuous and prolonged exercise like marathon, ultra running and triathlon can lead to changes in biomarkers of cardiac, muscle and kidney functional damage.

    We present the data of 29 (15 male, 14 female) non-elite participants of the Kalmar Ironman 2015 3.8 km swimming, 180 km cycling, 42 km running). Pre-race electrocardiograms and echocardiograms showed a high frequency of abnormalities. Post race elevations of troponin T, creatine kinase, myoglobin, N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide, aspartataminotransferas, creatinine and leucocytes returned to normal in almost all cases within 5-8 days. In 100% of male and 93% of female participants’ troponin T increase was compatible with the diagnosis of minor myocardial infarction. Some results are shown in the table (* denotes level of significance between male and female results).

                                               Before race         Directly after race        5-8 days after race

    CK [µkat/L]                                      

    male                                                 3.7 ± 2.1**       48,1 ± 44.1                4.5 ± 4.0

    female                                   1.5 ± 0.7          30.5 ± 41.5                3.1 ± 3.6

    Myoglobin [µg/L

    male                                      58.3 ± 35.9        2449 ± 1923             51.3 ± 38.5

    female                                    30.6 ± 11.0         1134 ± 756*             50.4 ± 67.7

    Creatinine [µmol/L]

    male                                       87.4 ± 11.4         119.9 ± 23.4           85.1 ± 12.1

    female                                     73.0 ± 13.4         84.1 ± 14.1***        69.6 ± 6.3

    p-NT-proBNP [ng/L]

    male                                        60.1 ± 25.2          658.7 ± 354.9        61.9 ± 22.7

    female                                      95.5 ± 69.5          907.9 ± 433.1        76.9 ± 26.9

    Troponin T [ng/L]

    male                                         8.5 ± 4.3             68.1 ± 41.1           7.4 ± 4.4

    female                                       7.1 ± 4.9             54.3 ± 49.5           5.8 ± 1.7

    The results will be discussed in the light of the current literature and the so far unanswered question about the long-term significance of repetitive organ damage due to strenuous exercise. Long-term follow-up of these athletes is needed.

  • 8.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital; Justus-Liebig Universität Giessen, Germany.
    Ragnarsson, Thony
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Therése
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Schreyer, Hendrik
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Breyne, Antonia
    Justus-Liebig Universität Giessen, Germany.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hjärtmarkörer ökar efter intensiv motion - oklar klinisk betydelse: Data från förstudie av Kalmar IronWoman-studien visar på troponin T-värden som vid hjärtinfarkt2016In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 31-33, article id D3CRArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biochemical changes after strenuous exercise - data from the Kalmar Ironman

    Strenuous and prolonged exercise like marathon, ultra running and triathlon can lead to changes in biomarkers of cardiac, muscle and kidney functional damage. We present the data of 30 (15 men, 15 women) participants of the Kalmar Ironman 2015. Pre-race electrocardiograms and echocardiograms showed a high frequency of abnormalities. Post race elevations of troponin T, creatine kinase, myoglobin, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, and creatinine returned to normal in almost all cases within 5-8 days. In all but one participant the troponin T pattern was compatible with the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. It is an up-to-date unanswered question whether the increase of troponin represents myocardial damage or just is a benign consequence of an intermittent change of the permeability of myocardial cell membranes.

  • 9.
    Danielsson, Tom
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    IRONMAN triathlon.: Familjeliv, tidspussel och extremidrott2016In: SVEBI, 16-17 november / [ed] Håkan Larsson, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Danielsson, Tom
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Maximal Oxygen Consumption Predicts Skeletal and Heart Muscle Biomarkers Changes after a Full Distance Ironman2017In: 19:e Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet 2017 / [ed] Svenska Hjärtförbundet, 2017, article id 148-A-A1701Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maximal Oxygen Consumption Predicts Skeletal and Heart Muscle Biomarkers Changes after a Full Distance Ironman

     

    Strenuous exercise like marathon or triathlon leads to disturbances of several biomarkers, not at least markers of skeletal and heart muscle damage. Different predictors of biomarker changes, e.g. sex, age and training experience have been discussed in the literature with contradictory results. To our best knowledge, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) has not been investigated in this setting.

    PURPOSE:  To evaluate predictors of biomarker changes in an Ironman triathlon.

    METHODS: In 39 non-elite athletes (10 female, 29 male; age 41.1 ± 9.7, range 24-70 years) who had performed a 20 m shuttle run test to predict VO2 max, biomarkers (cardiac troponin T (cTnT; reference < 14 ng/L), creatine kinase (CK; ref. < 1.9 µkat/L), myoglobin (MG; ref. <72 µg/L), and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP; ref. < 300 ng/L) were measured by standard laboratory methods 7 days before, directly after, and day 1, and 6 after the race.

    RESULTS: VO2 max was on average 49.9 ± 6.4 O2 ml/kg/minute (range 36.5-63.9). Three biomarkers measured directly after the race were predicted by VO2 max: CK (53 ± 50 µkat/L; R= -0.44; p=0.005), MG (2137 ± 2614 µg/L; R= -0.31; p=0.056) and NT-proBNP (772 ±2614 ng/L; R= -0.35; p=0.027). cTnT (75 ± 89) was not significantly predicted by VO2 max but cTnT leakage was, in contrast to the other biomarkers, higher with higher VO2 max (R= 0.10; p=0.55) and return to normal appeared to be faster with higher VO2 max.

    CONCLUSION: Earlier research into predictors of biomarker changes after strenuous exercise has found contradictory results concerning age, sex and training experience. In the present Kalmar IronWoMan study VO2 max was found to be a good predictor of biomarker changes with higher VO2 max values being correlated to lower values for CK, NT-proBNP and MG.           

  • 11.
    Danielsson, Tom
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Maximal Oxygen Consumption Predicts Skeletal and Heart Muscle Biomarkers Changes after a Full Distance Ironman2017In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 519-, article id 1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strenuous exercise like marathon or triathlon leads to disturbances of several biomarkers, not at least markers of skeletal and heart muscle damage. Different predictors of biomarker changes, e.g. sex, age and training experience have been discussed in the literature with contradictory results. To our best knowledge, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) has not been investigated in this setting.

    PURPOSE:  To evaluate predictors of biomarker changes in an Ironman triathlon.

    METHODS: In 39 non-elite athletes (10 female, 29 male; age 41.1 ± 9.7, range 24-70 years) who had performed a 20 m shuttle run test to predict VO2 max, biomarkers (cardiac troponin T (cTnT; reference < 14 ng/L), creatine kinase (CK; ref. < 1.9 µkat/L), myoglobin (MG; ref. <72 µg/L), and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP; ref. < 300 ng/L) were measured by standard laboratory methods 7 days before, directly after, and day 1, and 6 after the race.

    RESULTS: VO2 max was on average 49.9 ± 6.4 O2 ml/kg/minute (range 36.5-63.9). Three biomarkers measured directly after the race were predicted by VO2 max: CK (53 ± 50 µkat/L; R= -0.44; p=0.005), MG (2137 ± 2614 µg/L; R= -0.31; p=0.056) and NT-proBNP (772 ±2614 ng/L; R= -0.35; p=0.027). cTnT (75 ± 89) was not significantly predicted by VO2 max but cTnT leakage was, in contrast to the other biomarkers, higher with higher VO2 max (R= 0.10; p=0.55) and return to normal appeared to be faster with higher VO2 max.

    CONCLUSION: Earlier research into predictors of biomarker changes after strenuous exercise has found contradictory results concerning age, sex and training experience. In the present Kalmar IronWoMan study VO2 max was found to be a good predictor of biomarker changes with higher VO2 max values being correlated to lower values for CK, NT-proBNP and MG.           

  • 12.
    Danielsson, Tom
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ahnesjö, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Peak oxygen uptake predicts finishing- and segment time in a full distance Ironman2018In: Presented at the 23rd annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science (ECSS), Dublin, Ireland, July 4-7, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Ironman competitions and other extreme endurance events has spread worldwide attracting thousands of endurance-trained athletes, athletes who differ in anthropometric and training characteristics. The relationship between peak oxygen uptake and finishing- and segment time during a full distance IRONMAN competition (Swim 3.9km, Bike 180km and Run 42.2km) has not been examined thoroughly in non-elite athletes.

    PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), finishing time and segment time in non-elite athletes.

    METHODS: 39 non-elite athletes (10 female; age 41.1 ± 9.7, range 24-70 years) performed a 20 m shuttle run test to assess VO2peak. Association between VO2 and finishing- and segment time was estimated using bivariate correlation tests. Gender specific analysis was also performed.

    RESULTS: VO2peak peak was on average 49.9 ± 6.4 O2 ml/kg/minute, range 36.5-63.9 (pooled genders). Finishing time was on average 11h and 52 min. The average times for the different segments were; Swim 1h 21m, Bike 5h 46min and Run 4h 33min. The relationship between VO2peak and finishing time was significant to p<0.001 and                         0.51. The relationship between segment times were Swim  0.19, Bike  0.37 and Run  0.46 all at p<0.001. Gender specific analyses revealed that the association between VO2peak and finishing time was   0.80 for females and  0.49 for males. 

    CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that VO2peak is a good predictor of finishing time (approx. 50%) as well as for segment time with 19%, 37% and 46% for Swim, Bike and Run respectively (pooled genders). For females VO2peak explains as much as 80% of the variation in finishing time.

  • 13.
    Danielsson, Tom
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Carlsson, Jörg
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital.
    Schreyer, Hendrik
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Ahnesjö, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    ten Siethoff, Lasse
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ragnarsson, Thony
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Tugetam, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Blood biomarkers in male and female participants after an Ironman-distance triathlon2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1-9, article id e0179324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While overall physical activity is clearly associated with a better short-term and long-term health, prolonged strenuous physical activity may result in a rise in acute levels of blood-biomarkers used in clinical practice for diagnosis of various conditions or diseases. In this study, we explored the acute effects of a full Ironman-distance triathlon on biomarkers related to heart-, liver-, kidney- and skeletal muscle damage immediately post-race and after one week's rest. We also examined if sex, age, finishing time and body composition influenced the post-race values of the biomarkers.

    METHODS: A sample of 30 subjects was recruited (50% women) to the study. The subjects were evaluated for body composition and blood samples were taken at three occasions, before the race (T1), immediately after (T2) and one week after the race (T3). Linear regression models were fitted to analyse the independent contribution of sex and finishing time controlled for weight, body fat percentage and age, on the biomarkers at the termination of the race (T2). Linear mixed models were fitted to examine if the biomarkers differed between the sexes over time (T1-T3).

    RESULTS: Being male was a significant predictor of higher post-race (T2) levels of myoglobin, CK, and creatinine levels and body weight was negatively associated with myoglobin. In general, the models were unable to explain the variation of the dependent variables. In the linear mixed models, an interaction between time (T1-T3) and sex was seen for myoglobin and creatinine, in which women had a less pronounced response to the race.

    CONCLUSION: Overall women appear to tolerate the effects of prolonged strenuous physical activity better than men as illustrated by their lower values of the biomarkers both post-race as well as during recovery.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf