lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Chapman, Neil
    et al.
    Falmouth University, UK.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Day2014In: A Poem A Day / [ed] Nico Dockx, Clara Meister, Stockmans Kalendars & Curious , 2014Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Chapman, Neil
    et al.
    Falmouth University, UK.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Earth Motifs, Shallow Designs, Outlands2013Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Hirtler, Kurt
    et al.
    Ståhl, OlaWillis, Ika
    Parallax: Having Sex2002Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4. Hirtler, Kurt
    et al.
    Ståhl, OlaWillis, Ika
    Parallax: Mourning Revolution2003Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Keshavarz, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Snodgrass, Eric
    Malmö University.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Manipulations: Artefact - Site - Space2015In: Nordic Design Research Conference (NORDES) 2015: Design Ecologies Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, June 7–10, 2015, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm: Nordes , 2015, Vol. 6, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop gathers those who are interested in producing a set of responses to the concept of manipulation through a specific framework of design ecologies. The workshop will adapt a methodological approach linking artefact, site and space – an approach we hope will offer ample opportunity to explore manipulation both as a concept and a local and material practice that produces global effects.

    Participants are invited to contribute with specific case studies of artefacts, sites and/or spaces, reading them up and against the notion of manipulation considered here not merely as an outcome of environments but also as a source of the production of environments.

    The workshop is a part of MANIPULATIONS, an ongoing initiative in which scholars, researchers, artists and designers submit and discuss their investigations and explorations of the concept of manipulation.

  • 6. Keshavarz, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Snodgrass, Eric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Manipulations platform2014Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Neil, Chapman
    et al.
    Falmouth University, UK.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Spillways, pedways, silos2013 (ed. PoD)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    O'Sullivan, Simon
    et al.
    Goldsmiths Collage, UK.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Contours and Case Studies for a Dissenting Subjectivity: (or, how to live creatively in a fearful world)2006In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 147-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Ståhl, Ola
    15.09.20072011In: ak28 revisited and three parallel visions / [ed] Diana Kaur, Stockholm: Mount Analogue , 2011, p. 70-91Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10. Ståhl, Ola
    Black Box2011Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Central Saint Martin's College of Art, UK ; University of Leeds, UK.
    'blow into the freezing night': John Coltrane's 'Sheets of Sound' and the Actualization of a Dissentient Potential2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mode of improvisation, which Coltrane developed in the late 1950’s for a short period with his own band into the early 1960s, comprised a particular technique where scales are played very fast, over rapid chord changes and advanced substitutions, so that it appears as if entire scales, all possible combinations and variations, are played simultaneously, in a ferocious tempo, rupturing, opening up, both harmonic and rhythmic lines and patterns to a wider field of potential.

    This proposed paper takes this mode of improvisation – what Ira Girtler once referred to as Coltrane’s ‘sheets of sound’ – as its point of departure and attempts to explore it in terms of the actualization of virtual potentials within the context both of Coltrane’s later developments in modal and free form jazz, and the historical and socio-political situation in the USA at the time, which saw the emergence of more radical and militant forms of left-wing and civil rights activism. Drawing upon the writing of Spinoza, in particular the relation between the two notions of substantiaand potentia, and some of the ideas around virtuality and actualization put forth by Deleuze and Guattari, the paper attempts to link Coltrane’s music to this socio-political terrain not by means of interpretation or historical determination, but by delineating the site of an expanded aesthetics, operating through the virtual, throughthe actualization of virtual potentials, which is inexorably, albeit at times not obviously, linked also to a radical ethical and political program.

  • 12. Ståhl, Ola
    Cascadia Journal, 1907, 19122010In: Journal of Radical Shimming, no 9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Film2013 (ed. PoD)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Kafka and Deleuze/Guattari: Towards a Creative Critical Writing Practice2016In: Theory, Culture and Society. Explorations in Critical Social Science, ISSN 0263-2764, E-ISSN 1460-3616, Vol. 33, no 7-8, p. 221-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing upon the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, in particular their writing on Franz Kafka, this article stakes out the ground for a creative critical writing practice beyond the confines of literature. Exploring the notion of writing in relation to affect constellations, what causes one to write, and expressions without content, how one begins to write, the argument put forth is that in rethinking the distinction Deleuze and Guattari tend to make between artistic practice and philosophical thought, a space is opened up for transversal lines that may cross between these fields in practices that are creative and critical and involve what Deleuze and Guattari refer to as aesthetic figures as well as conceptual personae. These practices, it is argued, provide a potential link between aesthetics, on the one hand, and ethics and politics, on the other.

  • 15.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Long Kesh: Site - Sign - Body2016In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference / [ed] P. Lloyd & E. Bohemia, Brighton, 2016, Vol. 3, p. 1191-2101Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with the former prison at Long Kesh in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and, in particular, with the republican inmates’ protests in the 1970s and early 80s. Addressing the penal institution itself, its architecture, interior designs and the rituals implemented there, the paper argues these were not only designed but involved on-going design processes to which inmates responded by the developing a complex design practice involving the site itself as well as their bodies and the way these are made to signify within the semiotic regime of the penal institution.

  • 16.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Collective CREative Dissent, UK.
    Simon O'Sullivan, Art Encounters Deleuze and Guattari : Thought Beyond Representation: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. 256 pp. ISBN 14039180902007In: Journal of Visual Culture, ISSN 1470-4129, E-ISSN 1741-2994, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 157-159Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17. Ståhl, Ola
    'To Blow into that Freezing Night': John Coltrane’s ‘Sheets of Sound’ and the Actualization of a Dissentient Potential2005In: Presented at: The Living Thought of Gilles Deleuze, Copenhagen Business School, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mode of improvisation, which Coltrane developed in the late 1950’s for a short period with his own band into the early 1960s, comprised a particular technique where scales are played very fast, over rapid chord changes and advanced substitutions, so that it appears as if entire scales, all possible combinations and variations, are played simultaneously, in a ferocious tempo, rupturing, opening up, both harmonic and rhythmic lines and patterns to a wider field of potential.

    This proposed paper takes this mode of improvisation – what Ira Girtler once referred to as Coltrane’s ‘sheets of sound’ – as its point of departure and attempts to explore it in terms of the actualization of virtual potentials within the context both of Coltrane’s later developments in modal and free form jazz, and the historical and socio-political situation in the USA at the time, which saw the emergence of more radical and militant forms of left-wing and civil rights activism. Drawing upon the writing of Spinoza, in particular the relation between the two notions of substantia and potentia, and some of the ideas around virtuality and actualization put forth by Deleuze and Guattari, the paper attempts to link Coltrane’s music to this socio-political terrain not by means of interpretation or historical determination, but by delineating the site of an expanded aesthetics, operating through the virtual, through the actualization of virtual potentials, which is inexorably, albeit at times not obviously, linked also to a radical ethical and political program.

  • 18.
    Ståhl, Ola
    et al.
    University of the Arts London, UK ; Collective CREative Dissent C.CRED ; The alt.SPACE Network of Artist Research Groups.
    Chapman, Neil
    University of Falmouth, UK.
    BLOODCRYSTALPOLLENSTAR2010In: Deleuze and Contemporary Art / [ed] Simon O'Sullivan, Stephen Zepke, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010, p. 286-309Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Francesco Kulla approaches the lighthouse. Its white crystal eye marks a termination of his journey. And the other, the ruby eye, object of his devotion, was the sign that he should first depart. He has been on the road for years, perhaps decades. In any event, when he tells it, he will exaggerate. Proceeding step by step, always in the same dirt-black suit, always barefoot.² Now with a baseball cap, pilfered, its caption: ‘Can I buy you a drink or do you just want the cash?’ Soiled, his hair beneath it, the same. Without shoes but with head protected. 

  • 19. Ståhl, Ola
    et al.
    Chapman, Neil
    Falmouth University, UK.
    BLOODCRYSTALPOLLENSTAR2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation explores the creative and critical potentials of a collaborative and performative writing practice which has its origins in diverse disciplines. It engages with the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s on levels both conceptual and methodological. 

    In our recent jointly-produced work (‘BLOODCRYSTALPOLLENSTAR’, Deleuze and Contemporary Art, eds. O’Sullivan & Zepke, University of Edinburgh Press, 2010.), we set out to engage with a series of concepts taken from Deleuze & Guattari's work in a set of interlinked fictions. Throughout the text, however, a kind of image appears, which seems to disrupt the work while continuing to affirm its creative and critical process.  In Deleuze and Guattari’s writing, too, such images appear and are posed against the conventions of philosophy’s discipline. These mutant images are not insignificant elements, we propose. In their tenacious disruption they can be shown more clearly to be constitutive of critical work. Our presentation takes this methodological insight and questions its potential in a practice assembled differently, with components of art, literature, performance and philosophy. Departing from a series of moments in our previous text, it mobilises the resistance encountered when the mutating force of the image is exposed, doing so to propose a future for creative work.  

  • 20.
    Ståhl, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    "Rituals of Care"2016In: Open Design for E-very-thing: exploring new design purposes, 2016, p. 1-3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fashionable term at the moment used to describe the world that we now inhabit is the geological concept 'the Anthropocene.' Although the validity of the concept within geological discourse remains contested, it seems to have become a common albeit loosely defined term for a geological era following the Holocene defined by the (detrimental) impact of humanity - the Anthropos of the Anthropocene - on the geological strata of the planet.

    Facing the Anthropocene, what we are called upon to do, is to find other ways of inhabiting our bodies - of being embodied - and other ways of collectively inhabiting the geosphere - of being, in a sense, embedded. This involves aesthetics and ethics; developing sensibilities, forms of attentiveness, and constructing, or designing, universes in which life can be sustained. In this task, the notion and practice of ritual, if retuned to face the Anthropocene, may come to play a most crucial role.

    If we consider the etymology of the word 'ritual,' from early 14th Century Latin ritus, and detach it from its religious context, what we get is a sense of 'observance' taking the form of 'ceremony' but also the form of 'customs' and 'usages'; to be observant of and attentive to a principle or decree, manifests itself in the ceremonial as well as in the everyday; in the funerals and weddings as well as in the daily custom of brushing of one's teeth, or the usage of utensils for food consumption.

    As for the origins of the Latin root itself, it has not been established with certainty. There is, however, a compelling argument linking it to a Proto-Indo-European word for 'reasoning' and 'counting;' two words that both involve a process of thought by which we make sense of the world.

    Arguably, ritual today has little to do with thought and reflection, and more to do with habits and traditions, often problematic ones, and with activities that we do precisely without thinking, such as brushing our teeth. It is as if the link between observance, attention, and reflective thought, on the one hand, and ceremony, custom and usage, on the other, has been severed. We are no longer attentive to the rituals that make up the texture of the universes in and through which we live.

    Now, our argument is not that we should return to a pastoral or archaic past where this would have been the case but we would like to propose two more speculative questions: First, what if we were to turn our thinking toward the rituals through which we construct a life in order to figure out what it is we are observant of and attentive to in the Anthropocene; what our ceremonies, customs and habitual uses of the things that surround actually mean? Second, what if we were to turn to ritual as a form of practical and speculative thinking in order to figure out how to construct universes for ourselves within the Anthropocene, in which life, in some fashion, can be sustained and enriched?

    Ritual would then, perhaps, become the site of an emerging ethics (in the Greek sense [ethos], as having to do with 'habitual character' or 'disposition', or better perhaps, 'ways of living') and an emerging aesthetics (again, in the Greek sense [aisthanesthai], as having to do with aesthesis, perception, or the development of sensibilities and forms of attentiveness). Developing sensibilities and practices of attentiveness, and constructing ways of life on the basis of embodied and embedded, attentive experiences; another word for this might be 'care.'

    Care is an interesting word that is often understood superficially in a sense closely associated with the word 'cure.' We care for the ill in order to restore them to health; we care for the poor by easing their suffering; we care for our children by offering them our protection and unconditional love. The two words 'care' and 'cure', however, have very different etymologies. Whereas the word 'cure' stems from a Latin root, cura, meaning 'healing, paying attention to,' the word 'care' has a Proto-Germanic root in a word that bears connotations such as 'lament,' 'loss,' and 'grief.' Residual use of the word in this sense can be found in phrases such as, 'she doesn't have a care in the world.'

    Within the context of the Anthropocene, 'care' becomes a very interesting choice of word as the configuration of an ethical, or ethicoaesthetic site for new ways of living is defined by a sense of irrevocable loss. We live through a period of likely extinction that will require us to fundamentally rethink our understanding of what it means to be human beyond the Anthropos. What we stand before, then, is the task of finding out what it may mean to live a certain kind of extinction. This is an ethicoaesthetic task, and it is one premised on a sense of loss. We do have a care (a loss, a grief, a lament) and we do need to start caring for (paying attention to) the geosphere within which we construct our universes and to those with whom we labour in order to do so. This involves practicing 'care' and not least experimenting with the design of rituals of care. 

  • 21.
    Ståhl, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Towards a Post-Anthropocentric Speculative Archaeology (through Design): 2017In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As disciplines and practices archaeology and design stand in an interesting relationship to one another. Whereas it is the business of designers to construct material and, at times, immaterial universes that can sustain life (or, as we shall see, destroy life), it is the business of archaeologists, in the traditional sense of the word, to look at the remnants of those universes and the traces of those who populated them in order to understand the past and the ways in which it resonates in the present and in our conception of our possible futures.

    This leads us to pose the following question: If an intimate relationship can be located at the interstitial space between archaeology and design, what might happen if we were to construct transversal lines between and across these disciplines, and what concepts would be required for us to do so?

    Drawing upon the concept of the Anthropocene – a concept opening up to precisely such transdisciplinary and transversal approaches – this article explores the notion of a post-anthropocentric speculative archaeology interweaving a theoretical line of thought and a performative, fictive trajectory.

  • 22. Ståhl, Ola
    et al.
    Willis, IkaHirtler, Kurt
    Parallax: Writing (in) Terror(ism)2003Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Arvidsson, Anna-Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Blomqvist, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Bonja, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Håkansson, Lena
    Salinas, Miguel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Sterte, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Svensén, Tobias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Victor, Ole
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Metadesigning Design Research: How can designers collaboratively grow a research platform?2016In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference, Brighton, 2016, p. 1412-1430, article id 275Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘How can we design a meaningful and relevant research platform that will support futures of sustainability?’ was the question guiding the two-and-a-half-year- long, co-creative and emergent metadesign process of establishing a new research platform at the Department of Design, Linnaeus University, Sweden. The meta focus on developing a whole research environment, as a design practice and design research endeavour, should be valuable for the design research community. Findings concern the viability of co-creative approaches in such a remit, negotiations of artistic/scientific research conventions, and the design institution’s position in the multi-disciplined university. The research has identified tensions and conflicts between the academic institution and construct, and the application of ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies deemed auspicious for sustainability endeavours. The paper itself is a collaborative effort between eleven of the researchers involved in developing the research platform.

1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf