lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 158
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ammann, B
    et al.
    Chaix, L
    Eicher, U
    Elias, S A
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hofman, W
    Siegenthaler, U
    Tobolski, K
    Wilkinson, B
    Flora, fauna and stable isotopes in Late-Würm deposits at Lobsigensee (Swiss Plateau)1984In: Climatic changes on a yearly to millennial basis: geological, historical and instrumental records / [ed] Wibjörn Karlén & Nils-Axel Mörner, Dordrecht: Reidel Publishing Company , 1984, p. 69-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Ammann, B
    et al.
    Chaix, L
    Eicher, U
    Elias, S A
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hofman, W
    Siegenthaler, U
    Tobolski, K
    Wilkinson, B
    Vegetation, insects, molluscs and stable isotopes from Late Würm deposits at Lobsigensee (Swiss Plateau). Studies in the Late Quaternary of Lobsigensee 71984In: Revue de Paléobiologie, Vol. 2, p. 221-227Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Ammann, B
    et al.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Lotter, A F
    Switzerland1996Other (Other academic)
  • 4. Ammann, B
    et al.
    Lotter, A F
    Eicher, U
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wohlfarth, B
    Haeberli, W
    Lister, G
    Maisch, M
    Niessen, F
    Schlüchter, Ch
    The Würmian Late-glacial in lowland Switzerland1994In: Journal of Quaternary Science, ISSN 0267-8179, E-ISSN 1099-1417, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A synthesis is provided of Late-glacial (14-9 ka BP) environmental changes in lowland Switzerland (the 'Swiss Plateau'). The chronology of deglaciation and subsequent developments in vegetation cover in the area are summarised. The sequence of climatic variations experienced in the region during the Late-glacial is then described and a curve representing the main palaeotemperature variations is presented.

  • 5.
    Ammann, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    van der Knaap, Willhelm O.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Lang, Gerhard
    Biberach an der Riß, Germany.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaltenrieder, Petra
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Rösch, Manfred
    Landesamt für Denkmalpflege, Germany.
    Finsinger, Walter
    Institut de Botanique, France.
    Wright, Herbert E.
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Tinner, Willy
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    The potential of stomata analysis inconifers to estimate presence of conifer trees: examples from the Alps2014In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 249-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To estimate whether or not a plant taxon found in the fossil record was locally present may be difficult if only pollen is analyzed. Plant macrofossils, in contrast, provide a clear indication of a taxon’s local presence, although in some lake sediments or peats, macrofossils may be rare or degraded. For conifers, the stomata found on pollen slides are derived from needles and thus provide a valuable proxy for local presence and they can be identified to genus level. From previously published studies, a transect across the Alps based on 13 sites is presented. For basal samples in sandy silt above the till with high pollen values of Pinus, for example, we may distinguish pine pollen from distant sources (samples with no stomata), from reworked pollen (samples with stomata present). The first apparent local presence of most conifer genera based on stomata often but not always occurs together with the phase of rapid pollen increase (rational limit). An exception is Larix, with its annual deposition of needles and heavy poorly dispersed pollen, for it often shows the first stomata earlier, at the empirical pollen limit. The decline and potential local extinction of a conifer can sometimes be shown in the stomata record. The decline may have been caused by climatic change, competition, or human impact. In situations where conifers form the timberline, the stomata record may indicate timberline fluctuations. In the discussion of immigration or migration of taxa we advocate the use of the cautious term “apparent local presence” to include some uncertainties. Absence of a taxon is impossible to prove.

  • 6. Anderson, N. John
    et al.
    Bugmann, Harald
    Dearing, John A
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Linking palaeoenvironmental data and models to understand the past and to predict the future2006In: TRENDS in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 696-704Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Augustsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Peltola, Pasi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mazier, Florence
    Bergbäck, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Saarinen, Timo
    Effects of land use and climate change on erosion intensity and sediment geochemistry at Lake Lehmilampi, Finland2013In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 1247-1259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to evaluate the possible relationships between erosion intensity and changes in climate and land use during the past 5.5 cal. k years at Lake Lehmilampi, eastern Finland. In this study we compare a detailed geochemical sediment record with (1) forest and land use history inferred from the first pollen and charcoal records from Lake Lehmilampi, and (2) existing archaeological surveys and independent proxy-records of climate change in the study region. The physical and geochemical sediment parameters examined include grain size analysis data and 23 chemical elements, determined with four selective extractions and ICP-MS. There are indications of possible human impact in the lake catchment as early as the Neolithic period, c. 3000-2550 bc, but the first undisputable signs are dated to 1800-100 bc. Cereal pollen reappears at c. ad 1700 and increases rapidly until c. ad 1950. The Holocene Thermal Maximum, its end c. 2000 bc, and the Medieval Climate Anomaly' were major climate events that had a prominent effect on erosion intensity, while human impact was a more significant factor during the period 3000 bc-ad 800 and from ad 1500 onwards. Although signs of changes in erosion intensity found in the sediment were small in this small catchment, they were significant enough to have a clear impact on the fraction of potentially mobile element species. This fraction increases with decreasing erosion intensity, which is probably related to a higher degree of chemical weathering and leaching during periods of decreased erosion.

  • 8. Berglund, B E
    et al.
    Digerfeldt, G
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Engelmark, R
    Karlsson, S
    Risberg, J
    Miller, U
    Sweden1996Other (Other academic)
  • 9. Berglund, B.E.
    et al.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Björkman, L.
    Persson, T.
    Long-term changes in floristic diversity in southern Sweden – palynological richness, vegetation dynamics and land-use.2008In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 573-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rarefaction technique is applied to two Holocene pollen sequences (covering the last 12,000 calendar years) from two lakes in southern Sweden. One represents an open agricultural landscape, the other a partly wooded and less cultivated landscape. The inferred palynological richness is interpreted as an approximate measure of floristic diversity at the landscape scale. The overall trend is an increased diversity from the mid-Holocene to the Modern period, which is linked to a parallel rise in human impact. The pattern is similar for the two sites with peaks corresponding to archaeological periods characterised by deforestation and expanding settlement and agriculture. The highest diversity was reached during the Medieval period, about A.D. 1,000-1,400. Declining diversity during the last 200 years characterises the agrarian landscape. These results confirm, for southern Scandinavia, the "intermediate disturbance" hypothesis for biodiversity at the landscape scale and on millennial to century time scales. They have implications for landscape management in modern nature conservation that has the purpose of maintaining and promoting biodiversity.

  • 10.
    Bhend, Jonas
    et al.
    Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology, Switzerland.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hansson, Hans-Christen
    Stockholm University.
    Attributing causes of regional climate change in the Baltic Sea area2015In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, 2015, Vol. 17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we assess to what extent the effect of forcing mechanisms on the observed climate change in the Baltic Sea area can be detected. In particular, we assess the effect of factors causing large-scale warming (mainly anthropogenic greenhouse gases) and the regional effect of atmospheric aerosols and land-cover and land-use changes. Unfortunately, only very few targeted analyses for the Baltic catchment area are available at the moment, but findings at the regional scale are generally qualitatively consistent with global or hemispheric analyses.

    The observed warming in summer cannot be explained without human influence (in particular the warming effect of increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations). In other seasons and for other aspects of regional warming, findings are mixed or not significant as of yet. In addition, large-scale circulation and rainfall changes in the northern hemisphere and the Arctic have been detected to exceed natural internal variability. Other aspects of regional climate change including changes in storminess, snow properties, runoff and the changing physicalproperties of the Baltic Sea have not been formally attributed to human influence yet. Scientific understanding of the effect of aerosols on regional climate is still accumulating. It is likely that the major emission changes in Europe have had an effect on the climate in the Baltic region, the magnitude of which, however, is still unknown. Development of the modelling capability and targeted analyses are urgently needed to reduce the uncertainties related to the effect of aerosol changes on regional observed climate change. Historic deforestation and recent reforestation are the major anthropogenic land-cover changes affecting the Baltic Sea area. From all studies at hand it can be concluded that there is no evidence that anthropogenic land-cover change would be one of the forcings behind the recent warming in the Baltic region. However, past anthropogenic land-cover change may have influenced regional climate significantly already more than two thousand years ago.

  • 11. Boyle, John F.
    et al.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Kaplan, Jed O.
    Dearing, John A.
    Modelling prehistoric land-use and carbon budgets: a critical review2011In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 715-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An evaluation of modelled estimates for C release following early land clearance at the global level based on new model assumptions suggests that earlier studies may have underestimated its magnitude, chiefly because of underestimation of the mid-Holocene global population. Alternative information sources for population and land utilisation support both a greater total CO(2) release and a greater Neolithic contribution. Indeed, we show that the quantity of terrestrial C release due to early farming, even using the most conservative assumptions, greatly exceeds the net terrestrial C release estimated by inverse modelling of ice core data by Elsig et al. (Elsig J, Schmitt J, Leuenberger D, Schneider R, Eyer M, Leuenberger M et al. ( 2009) Stable isotope constraints on Holocene carbon cycle changes from an Antarctic ice core. Nature 461: 507-510), though uncertainty about past global population estimates precludes calculation of a precise value.

  • 12. Broström, Anna
    et al.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ihse, M
    Odgaard, B
    Pollen-landscape relationships in modern analogues of ancient cultural landscapes in southern Sweden – a first step toeards quantification of vegetation openness in the past1998In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 7, p. 189-201Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Broström, Anna
    et al.
    Geobiosphere Science Centre, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, 22362, Lund, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Anne Birgitte
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hjelle, Kari
    Mazier, Florence
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Binney, Heather
    Bunting, Jane
    Fyfe, Ralph
    Meltsov, Viveca
    Poska, Anneli
    Rasanen, Satu
    Soepboer, Welmoed
    von Stedingk, Henrik
    Suutari, Henna
    Sugita, Shinya
    Pollen productivity estimates of key European plant taxa for quantitative reconstruction of past vegetation: a review2008In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 461-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information on the spatial distribution of past vegetation on local, regional and global scales is increasingly used within climate modelling, nature conservancy and archaeology. It is possible to obtain such information from fossil pollen records in lakes and bogs using the landscape reconstruction algorithm (LRA) and its two models, REVEALS and LOVE. These models assume that reliable pollen productivity estimates (PPEs) are available for the plant taxa involved in the quantitative reconstructions of past vegetation, and that PPEs are constant through time. This paper presents and discusses the PPEs for 15 tree and 18 herb taxa obtained in nine study areas of Europe. Observed differences in PPEs between regions may be explained by methodological issues and environmental variables, of which climate and related factors such as reproduction strategies and growth forms appear to be the most important. An evaluation of the PPEs at hand so far suggests that they can be used in modelling applications and quantitative reconstructions of past vegetation, provided that consideration of past environmental variability within the region is used to inform selection of PPEs, and bearing in mind that PPEs might have changed through time as a response to climate change. Application of a range of possible PPEs will allow a better evaluation of the results.

  • 14. Broström, Anna
    et al.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pollen productivity estimates for the reconstruction of past vegetation in the cultural landscape of southern Sweden2004In: The Holocene, Vol. 14, p. 368-381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Broström, Anna
    et al.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Petter, Pilesjö
    Estimating the spatial scale of pollen dispersal in the cultural landscape of southern Sweden2005In: The Holocene, Vol. 15 (2), p. 252-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Bunting, Jean
    et al.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Sugita, Shinya
    R, Middleton
    Broström, Anna
    Vegetation structure and pollen source area2004In: The Holocene, Vol. 14, p. 651-660Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Carcaillet, C
    et al.
    Almquist, H
    Asnong, H
    Bradshaw, R H W
    Carrion, J S
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Gajewski, K
    Haas, J N
    Haberle, S G
    Hadorn, P
    Müller, S D
    Richard, P J H
    Richoz, I
    Rösch, M
    Sanchez Goni, M F
    von Stedingk, H
    Stevenson, A C
    Talon, B
    Tardy, C
    Tinner, W
    Tryterud, E
    Wick, L
    Willis, K J
    Holocene biomass burning and gloibal dynamics of carbon cycle2002In: Chemosphere, Vol. 49, p. 845-863Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Cui, Qiao-Yu
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Holocene local forest history at two sites in Småland, southern Sweden: Insights from quantitative reconstruction using the Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Cui, Qiao-Yu
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Stenberg, Li
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund University.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Tallinn University, Estonia.
    Zernova, Ganna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Historical land-use and landscape change in southern Sweden and implications for present and future biodiversity2014In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 4, no 18, p. 3555-3570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two major aims of this study are (1) To test the performance of the Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm (LRA) to quantify past landscape changes using historical maps and related written sources, and (2) to use the LRA and map reconstructions for a better understanding of the origin of landscape diversity and the recent loss of species diversity. Southern Sweden, hemiboreal vegetation zone. The LRA was applied on pollen records from three small bogs for four time windows between AD 1700 and 2010. The LRA estimates of % cover for woodland/forest, grassland, wetland, and cultivated land were compared with those extracted from historical maps within 3-km radius around each bog. Map-extracted land-use categories and pollen-based LRA estimates (in % cover) of the same land-use categories show a reasonable agreement in several cases; when they do not agree, the assumptions used in the data (maps)-model (LRA) comparison are a better explanation of the discrepancies between the two than possible biases of the LRA modeling approach. Both the LRA reconstructions and the historical maps reveal between-site differences in landscape characteristics through time, but they demonstrate comparable, profound transformations of the regional and local landscapes over time and space due to the agrarian reforms in southern Sweden during the 18th and 19th centuries. The LRA was found to be the most reasonable approach so far to reconstruct quantitatively past landscape changes from fossil pollen data. The existing landscape diversity in the region at the beginning of the 18th century had its origin in the long-term regional and local vegetation and land-use history over millennia. Agrarian reforms since the 18th century resulted in a dramatic loss of landscape diversity and evenness in both time and space over the last two centuries leading to a similarly dramatic loss of species (e.g., beetles).

  • 20.
    Cui, Qiao-Yu
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Tallinn University.
    Greisman, Annica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Jacobson, George
    The University of Malne.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University.
    The role of tree composition in Holocene fire history of the hemiboreal and southern boreal zones of southern Sweden, as revealed by the application of the Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm: Implications for biodiversity and climate-change issues2013In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 1747-1763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a quantitative reconstruction of local forest history at two sites, Stavsåkra (hemiboreal zone) and Storasjö (southern boreal zone), in southern Sweden (province of Småland) to evaluate possible causes of contrasting Holocene fire histories in mid- and late Holocene. The Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm (LRA) is applied to evaluate between-site differences in the relative abundance of deciduous trees and Pinus (pine) and landscape/woodland openness during the Holocene. The LRA estimates of local vegetation abundance are compared with other proxies of local vegetation, that is, plant and beetle remains. The LRA results suggest that Pinus was a major tree taxon in the woodlands of Storasjö during mid- and late Holocene, while Tilia(linden) and Betula (birch) were dominant at Stavsåkra. The contrasting fire histories are shown to be strongly related to between-site differences in tree composition during mid-Holocene, 4000–2000 BC in particular. The archaeological/historical and beetle data indicate contrasting land uses from c. 1000BC (late Bronze Age/early Iron Age), grazing in open Calluna heaths at Stavsåkra and woodland grazing at Storasjö. Between-site differences in fire historyduring late Holocene were likely due to different land-use practices. Between-site differences in tree composition in mid-Holocene are best explainedby local climatic and geological/geomorphological differences between the hemiboreal and southern boreal zones of Småland, which might also be the primary cause of between-site differences in land-use histories during late Holocene. Maintenance of biodiversity at the landscape scale in the studyarea requires that existing old pine woodlands and Calluna heath are managed with fire and cattle grazing. Further climate warming might lead to higherprobabilities of climate-induces fire, in particular in pine-dominated woodlands.

  • 21.
    Cui, Qiao-Yu
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå Univ.
    Greisman, Annica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Zernova, Ganna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    A case study of the role of climate, humans, and ecological setting in Holocene fire history of northwestern Europe2015In: Science China. Earth Sciences, ISSN 1674-7313, E-ISSN 1869-1897, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 195-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the major results from studies of fire history over the last 11000 years (Holocene) in southern Sweden, on the basis of palaeoecological analyses of peat sequences from three small peat bogs. The main objective is to emphasize the value of multiple, continuous sedimentary records of macroscopic charcoal (macro-C) for the reconstruction of local to regional past changes in fire regimes, the importance of multi-proxy studies, and the advantage of model-based estimates of plant cover from pollen data to assess the role of tree composition and human impact in fire history. The chronologies at the three study sites are based on a large number of C-14 dates from terrestrial plant remains and age-depth models are achieved using Bayesian statistics. Fire history is inferred from continuous records of macro-C and microscopic charcoal counts on pollen slides. The Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm (LRA) for pollen-based quantitative reconstruction of local vegetation cover is applied on the three pollen records for plant cover reconstruction over the entire Holocene. The results are as follows: (1) the long-term trends in fire regimes are similar between sites, i.e., frequent fires during the early Holocene until ca. 9 ka BP, low fire frequency during the mid-Holocene, and higher fire frequency from ca. 2.5 ka BP; (2) this broad trend agrees with the overall fire history of northwestern and western Europe north of the Mediterranean area, and is due to climate forcing in the early and mid-Holocene, and to anthropogenic land-use in the late Holocene; (3) the LRA estimates of plant cover at the three sites demonstrate that the relative abundance of pine played a primordial role in the early and mid-Holocene fire history; and (4) the between-site differences in the charcoal records and inferred fire history are due to local factors (i.e., relative abundance of pine, geomorphological setting, and anthropogenic land-use) and taphonomy of charcoal deposition in the small peat bogs. It is shown that continuous macro-C records are most useful to disentangle local from regional-subcontinental fire history, and climate-induced from human-induced fire regimes, and that pollen-based LRA estimates of local plant cover are more adequate than pollen percentages for the assessment of the role of plant composition on fire history.

  • 22.
    Dearing, JA
    et al.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Acma, B
    Anadolu University, Turkey.
    Bub, S
    University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany.
    Chambers, FM
    University of Gloucestershire, UK.
    Chen, X
    China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), China ; Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Cooper, J
    British Museum, UK.
    Crook, D
    University of Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dong, XH
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Dotterweich, M
    GEOarch – Applied Geoarchaeology, Germany ; University of Vienna, Austria.
    Edwards, ME
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Foster, TH
    University of Tulsa, USA.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Galop, D
    Toulouse Jean Jaures University, France.
    Gell, P
    Federation University Australia, Australia.
    Gil, A
    Museo de Historia Natural de San Rafael, Argentina.
    Jeffers, E
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Jones, RT
    University of Exeter, UK.
    Anupama, K
    French Institute of Pondicherry, India.
    Langdon, PG
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Marchant, R
    University of York, UK.
    Mazier, F
    Toulouse Jean Jaures University, France.
    McLean, CE
    Youngstown State University, USA.
    Nunes, LH
    State University of Campinas, Brazil.
    Sukumar, R
    Indian Institute of Science, India.
    Suryaprakash, I
    Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, India.
    Umer, M
    Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia.
    Yang, XD
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Wang, R
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Zhang, K
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Social-ecological systems in the Anthropocene: The need for integrating social and biophysical records at regional scales.2015In: The Anthropocene Review, ISSN 2053-0196, E-ISSN 2053-020X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 220-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding social-ecological system dynamics is a major research priority for sustainable management of landscapes, ecosystems and resources. But the lack of multi-decadal records represents an important gap in information that hinders the development of the research agenda. Without improved information on the long-term and complex interactions between causal factors and responses, it will be difficult to answer key questions about trends, rates of change, tipping points, safe operating spaces and pre-impact conditions. Where available long-term monitored records are too short or lacking, palaeoenvironmental sciences may provide continuous multi-decadal records for an array of ecosystem states, processes and services. Combining these records with conventional sources of historical information from instrumental monitoring records, official statistics and enumerations, remote sensing, archival documents, cartography and archaeology produces an evolutionary framework for reconstructing integrated regional histories. We demonstrate the integrated approach with published case studies from Australia, China, Europe and North America.

  • 23.
    Fyfe, Ralph M.
    et al.
    Plymouth University, UK.
    Twiddle, Claire
    University of Aberdeen, UK.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Tallinn University, Estonia.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Barratt, Philip
    Queen's University of Belfast, UK.
    Caseldine, Christopher J.
    University of Exeter, UK.
    Dodson, John
    Institute for Environmental Research, Australia.
    Edwards, Kevin J.
    University of Aberdeen, UK.
    Farrell, Michelle
    University of Hull, UK.
    Froyd, Cynthia
    Swansea University, UK.
    Grant, Michael J.
    Wessex Archaeology, UK;Kingston University, UK.
    Huckerby, Elizabeth
    Oxford Archaeology North, UK.
    Innes, James B.
    Durham University, UK.
    Shaw, Helen
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Waller, Martyn
    Kingston University, UK.
    The Holocene vegetation cover of Britain and Ireland: overcoming problems of scale and discerning patterns of openness2013In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 73, p. 132-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vegetation of Europe has undergone substantial changes during the course of the Holocene epoch, resulting from range expansion of plants following climate amelioration, competition between taxa and disturbance through anthropogenic activities. Much of the detail of this pattern is understood from decades of pollen analytical work across Europe, and this understanding has been used to address questions relating to vegetation-climate feedback, biogeography and human impact. Recent advances in modelling the relationship between pollen and vegetation now make it possible to transform pollen proportions into estimates of vegetation cover at both regional and local spatial scales, using the Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm (LRA), i.e. the REVEALS (Regional Estimates of VEgetation Abundance from Large Sites) and the LOVE (Local VEgetation) models. This paper presents the compilation and analysis of 73 pollen stratigraphies from the British Isles, to assess the application of the LRA and describe the pattern of landscape/woodland openness (i.e. the cover of low herb and bushy vegetation) through the Holocene. The results show that multiple small sites can be used as an effective replacement for a single large site for the reconstruction of regional vegetation cover. The REVEALS vegetation estimates imply that the British Isles had a greater degree of landscape/woodland openness at the regional scale than areas on the European mainland. There is considerable spatial bias in the British Isles dataset towards wetland areas and uplands, which may explain higher estimates of landscape openness compared with Europe. Where multiple estimates of regional vegetation are available from within the same region inter-regional differences are greater than intra-regional differences, supporting the use of the REVEALS model to the estimation of regional vegetation from pollen data. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    A palaeohydrological study of Krageholmssjön (Scania, South Sweden). Regional vegetation history and water-level changes1984Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    A valuable textbook on pollen analysis and vegetation history in French1990In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 19, p. 351-352Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Analyse pollinique et macrorestes végétaux des sédiments tardi- et postglaciaires du Grand Marais de Boussens, Moyen-Pays romand, Suisse1984In: Dissertationes botanicae, Vol. 72, p. 117-136Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Contribution à l'étude Tardiglaciaire de la région lémanique. Le profil de St. Laurent. II. Diagramme pollinique1977In: Berichte der Schweizerischen botanischen Gesellschaft, Vol. 87, p. 190-206Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Development of the cultural landscape2000In: Environmental Changes in Fennoscandia during Late Quaternary: Report 37 / [ed] Sandgren P., LUNDQUA , 2000, , p. 69-82p. 69-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ecosystem dynamics under changing climate – some illustrative cases from the past and their possible use in climate risk analysis2004In: The ESS Bulletin, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 44-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Etude palynologique de l'évolution tardi- et postglaciaire de la végétation du Moyen-Pays romand (Suisse)1981Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Evolution tardiglaciaire de la végétation du Moyen-Pays Romand (Suisse): floristique, végétation et chronologie1984In: Revue de Paléobiologie, Vol. volume spécial, p. 63-77Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Future maintenance of biodiversity within the South Swedish Cultural Landscape: contribution of palaeoecological studies.2007In: The George Wright Society Biennal Conference, St Paul, Minnesota, April 16-20 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    IGCP 158 Palaeohydrological changes in the temperate zone in the last 15000 years: Symposium at Höör, Sweden, 18-26 May 1987 : abstracts of lectures and posters1987Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Late-glacial and Holocene environments of some ancient lakes in the western Swiss Plateau1985Other (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Modélisation et reconstruction des paysages passés: quelles leçons du passé pour la gestion des paysages présents et futurs.2007In: Colloque 2007 du Centre de recherché CAREN (Centre armoricain de recherche en environnement) "Observation et quantification des changements environnementaux en différentes échelles de temps et d'espace"., 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    On the occurrence of Betula nana L. pollen grains in the Late-glacial deposits of Lobsigensee (Swiss Plateau). Studies in the Late Quaternary of Lobsigensee21984In: Revue de Paléobiologie, Vol. 2, p. 181-188Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Palaeohydrology, palaeoclimate and cultural landscape: a palaeohydrological study in the context of the Ystad project1984In: Kulturlandskapet: dess framväxt och förändring / [ed] G. Regnéll, Lund: Växt-ekologiska Inst., Lund University. , 1984Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Paleohydrologi och bosättningshistoria: forntida vattenståndsförändringar och deras betydelse för kulturlandskapet1990In: Bebyggelsehistorisk Tidskrift, Vol. 19, p. 9-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Plant Macrofossil Methods and Studies: Paleolimnological applications2007In: The Encyclopedia of Quaternary Scienc / [ed] Scott A. Elias, Elsevier , 2007, 1, p. 2337-2355Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Postglacial paleoclimatic changes in Scandinavia and Central Europe. A tentative correlation based on studies of lake-level fluctuations1985In: Ecologia Mediterranea, ISSN 0153-8756, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 159-175Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Quaternary ecology: a palaeoecological perspective1993In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 8, p. 85-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    South Sweden1994Other (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    The Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm (LRA) and the European Pollen Database – potentials and requirements.2007In: EPD Open Conference, Aix-en-Provence 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Water-level changes, climate and human impact: a palaeohydrological study of Krageholm lake (Scania, southern Sweden)1984In: Climatic changes on a yearly to millennial basis: geological, historical and instrumental records / [ed] Wibjörn Karlén & Nils-Axel Mörner, Dordrecht: Reidel Publishing Company , 1984, p. 147-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Berglund, B E
    Land-use history during the last 2700 years in the area of Bjäresjö, southern Sweden1988Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    et al.
    Deptartment of Quaternary Geology, University of Lund .
    Berglund, B E
    Göransson, H
    Hjelmroos, M
    Kolstrup, E
    Chronology of the pollen diagrams from the Ystad area1991In: The cultural landscape during 6000 years in southern Sweden: the Ystad project / [ed] Björn E. Berglund, Copenhagen: Munksgaard , 1991, p. 489-496Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Birks, H J B
    Emanuelsson, U
    Berglund, B E
    Modern pollen/land-use relationships as an aid in the reconstruction of past land-uses and cultural landscapes: an example from South Sweden1992In: Vegetation history and archaeobotany, Vol. 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Birks, H J B
    Emanuelsson, U
    Karlsson, S
    Lagerås, P
    Olausson, D
    Application of modern pollen/land-use relationships to the interpretation of pollen diagrams - reconstructions of land-use history in South Sweden 3000-0 BP1994In: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, ISSN 0034-6667, E-ISSN 1879-0615, Vol. 82, no 1-2, p. 47-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modem pollen/land-use data-set of 124 surface samples (moss polsters) from different vegetation and land-use types in south Sweden is presented. The samples are from non-fertilized grazed areas, burned and grazed heaths, traditionally managed fodder-producing meadows and cultivated fields, and deciduous forests. Twenty nine environmental (e.g. management type, soil chemistry) variables are available for the 124 samples. Patterns of modern local pollen variation in relation to these environmental variables are explored by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and tested by associated statistical procedures. The modem data-set is used to aid interpretation of extra-local pollen sequences from two small lakes and one mire in south Sweden, using CCA as a means of comparing modem and fossil spectra. The resulting land-use reconstructions are compared to earlier interpretations of the same pollen-stratigraphical data using the more traditional ''indicator-species'' approach. Emphasis is placed on the history of mowing and grazing in south Sweden as an example of the potential uses of the comparative approach for interpretating fossil pollen data in terms of past land-use.

  • 49.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Birks, H J B
    Ihse, M
    Rundborg, S
    Pollen/landscape calibration based on lake-sediment surface samples and modern landscape mapping as an aid for quantification of land surfaces cleared from forest in the past - a case study in South Sweden1998In: Paläoklimaforschung, Vol. 27, p. 31-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Gaillard, Marie-Jose
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Birks, H J B
    Karlsson, S
    Lagerås, P
    Quantitative reconstruction of past land-use and soil conditions using the modern analogue approach - a case study in south Sweden1997In: PACT, Vol. 50, p. 431-442Article in journal (Refereed)
1234 1 - 50 of 158
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf