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  • 1.
    Coleman, Jim
    et al.
    Open Univ, UK.
    Hultgren, Kristina
    Open Univ, UK.
    Li, Wei
    UCL, UK.
    Tsui, Cheng-Fang Cynthia
    Natl Chengchi Univ, Taiwan.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Forum on English-medium Instruction2018Ingår i: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 52, nr 3, s. 701-720Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    During the first half of 2017, four scholars who know English-medium instruction (EMI) well and view it from different perspectives took part in a round-robin exchange. The forum contributors answered six sets of questions on aspects of EMI: defining terms; learning English in an EMI environment; the political or policy framework; learning a subject in a second language; teachers working in a second language; and EMI and multilingual education. Below is a summary of their answers (a longer version can be found in the online version of this Forum as supplementary content). The questions were devised and the responses edited by Philip Shaw.

  • 2.
    Hyland, Ken
    et al.
    University of Hong Kong, China.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Introduction2016Ingår i: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2016, s. 1-13Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 3.
    Hyland, Ken
    et al.
    University of Hong Kong, China.
    Shaw, PhilipLinnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes2016Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Irvine, Aileen
    et al.
    Edinburgh University, UK.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    To what extent do L2 students in UK Higher Education acquire academic and subject-specific vocabulary incidentally?2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Across the UK hundreds of thousands of international students pursue a higher degree through the medium of L2 English, attending the same lectures and reading the same texts as their L1 counterparts.  Although most of these international students will have initially passed through some form of English language proficiency gate-keeping exercise (such as minimum required IELTS scores), little allowance may be made thereafter for possible gaps in necessary vocabulary knowledge. Thus, L2 students may be implicitly assumed either to have sufficient working knowledge of the required vocabulary, or to be able to “pick up” this vocabulary knowledge incidentally during the course of their studies.

    This paper explores whether the Academic Word List (AWL) and subject-specific vocabulary knowledge of L2 undergraduates taking a degree in Biology at a UK university is, in fact, comparable to that of their L1 counterparts.  Results from a vocabulary test administered in the third week of Semester 1 of the first year of studies indicated a relatively substantial gap between the levels of vocabulary knowledge of L1 and L2 students. This gap was particularly apparent in knowledge of lower-frequency AWL vocabulary. A post-test was administered 28 weeks later, towards the end of the students’ first year at university. This paper will report on the results of the post-test and discuss to what extent this previously perceived linguistic “gap” between L1 and L2 students may have increased or decreased. The paper will also outline a follow-up investigation into the ways in which L2 students deal with unknown vocabulary encountered during the course of their undergraduate degree studies.

  • 5.
    Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Engaging with terminology in the multilingual classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 lectures and English reading2017Ingår i: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 8, nr 1, s. 3-18Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In some academic settings where English is not the first language it is nonetheless common for reading to be assigned in English, and the expectation is often that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the first language as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of eight undergraduate lectures from two universities in such a setting, this paper provides a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e. how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in these settings, or to exploit the affordances of multilingual environments.

  • 6.
    Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Irvine, Aileen
    The University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Engaging with terminology in the parallel-language classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 and English2016Ingår i: ASLA-symposiet 2016, 2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In settings in which English is used as a medium of instruction (EMI) in parallel with another language, a common expectation is that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the L1 as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of a sample of lectures from two courses in a partial EMI setting, in which the lectures were in Swedish and the textbooks were in English, this paper will present a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e., how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in partial EMI settings, or to exploit the affordances of these learning environments.

  • 7.
    Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Pecorari, Diane
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples Republic of China.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Words for what?: Contrasting university students' receptive and productive academic vocabulary needs2018Ingår i: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 50, s. 28-39Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    With the objective of determining what academic vocabulary students use productively, and exploring the relationship between receptive and productive academic vocabulary, this paper continues the dialog on what constitutes academic vocabulary. By adopting a set of principled criteria (ratio, dispersion, discipline specificity and range) and by approximating the procedures from a recent study of academic vocabulary, the academic vocabulary found in students' writing is identified and subsequently compared to the academic vocabulary found in published academic writing (indexical of receptive purposes). Nearly 600 words emerge as being represented significantly more frequently in students' academic writing than in their non-academic writing, demonstrating that students distinguish in their writing between academic and non-academic vocabulary. Furthermore, the investigation finds significant differences between students' productive academic vocabulary and academic vocabulary serving receptive purposes, suggesting that students' productive and receptive academic vocabulary needs are far from identical. The findings reported here are intended to serve as a tool for EAP educators working to help students develop academic vocabulary fit for purpose, as well as an incentive for EAP researchers to continue to explore the nature of academic vocabulary. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    McMillion, Alan
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Reading proficiency in advanced L2 users2016Ingår i: Advanced Proficiency and Exceptional Ability in Second Languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Amsterdam: Walter de Gruyter, 2016, s. 149-184Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 9.
    Mežek, Špela
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Learning subject-specific L2 terminology: The effect of medium and order of exposure2015Ingår i: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 38, s. 57-69Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the globalised university environment, many university students are expected to learn subject-specific terminology in both the local language and the L2 (English) by learning from two media in two different languages: lectures in the local language and reading in L2 English. These students' bilingual learning is greatly affected by the learning strategies they employ. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of student choice of learning media and the order of media on their learning and perception of learning of terminology in English. The results confirm that added exposure to terminology in different media, even in different languages, contributes to learning and show that, in some circumstances, learning terminology from reading may be more effective than learning it from a lecture. The results also show that students do not correctly judge their knowledge of terms learnt from different media in different languages and that they underestimate knowledge gained from reading in L2. Implications for teaching are discussed.

  • 10.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Intertextuality in academic and non-academic texts: What are the sources and outcomes for EAP writers?2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality in its broadest sense—the relationship between two texts—is a pervasive feature of academic writing, as manifested by features such as citations to earlier texts and the sets of features such as structure and organisation which are shared by texts in a given genre and/or academic discipline.

     

    Many of the intertextual features of academic writing, such as the choice of reporting verb and verb form, have been thoroughly researched and described (e.g., Charles, 2006; Shaw, 1992). Much is also know about a specific, highly problematic form of intertextuality: plagiarism (e.g., Pecorari & Shaw, 2012). However, less attention has been given to the ways in which novice academic writers become aware of conventional intertextual practices, and less still to the transferability of this feature to writing in the workplace.

     

    This paper will present the results of a corpus-based investigation of intertextuality in two domains: the leisure-time reading which lower-division undergraduates do, and a common workplace genre.  By triangulating the results from these two corpora with existing findings about the intertextual features of academic texts it will be possible to describe the extent to which these features overlap with, or diverge from, each other.  This will thus provide an indication of the features which can reasonably be expected to transfer from one domain to another, and which cannot, and should therefore be the subject of explicit instruction in the English for Specific Academic Purposes classroom.

     

  • 11.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    So what should we do?2018Ingår i: Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice / [ed] Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2018, s. 157-168Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 12.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Shaw, PhilipLinnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice2018Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 13.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Types of student intertextuality and faculty attitudes2012Ingår i: Journal of second language writing, ISSN 1060-3743, E-ISSN 1873-1422, Vol. 21, nr 2, s. 149-164Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality is a prominent feature of academic writing, and the ability to use sources effectively and appropriately is an essential skill which novice writers must acquire. It is also a complex skill, and student performance is not always successful. It is presumably beneficial for students to receive consistent messages about what source use is and is not appropriate, but some evidence suggests that university teachers and other gatekeepers may fall short of this consistency. This paper reports the findings of semi-structured text-based interviews aimed at understanding the basis of teacher attitudes and responses to intertextuality in academic writing. Teachers who were asked to evaluate the same examples from student texts differed in their judgments about whether the examples were appropriate, and provided different types of explanation for their judgments. These explanations enable us to develop a four-part typology of intertextuality which allows analytic discussion of differing judgments. The implications both of the teacher judgments and of the typology for second language writing instruction are discussed and an assessment of the relevance of our findings for the theme of this special issue is provided.

  • 14.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Reading in tertiary education: Undergraduate student practices and attitudes2012Ingår i: Quality in Higher Education, ISSN 1353-8322, E-ISSN 1470-1081, Vol. 18, nr 2, s. 235-256Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the findings of a study of undergraduate student use of, and attitudes toward, textbooks and other assigned reading. More than 1200 students of various subjects at three Swedish universities were surveyed. Most students said reading played an important role in learning generally and attributed positive characteristics to their textbooks. However, students’ self-reported reading behaviour was at odds with these attitudes, with many students reporting some degree of non-compliance with reading assignments and a small group of students expressing active resistance to completing reading assignments. Although textbooks were perceived as valuable, students reported a preference for learning course content from other resources, such as lectures and lecture notes. Textbooks were perceived as alternatives, rather than complements, to attending class. Differences were found across academic disciplines. Implications of these findings for educational administration and classroom practice are discussed.

  • 15.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    English Textbooks in Parallel-language Tertiary Education2015Ingår i: English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Basturkmen, H., London: Routledge, 2015Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Are we making our students plagiarize?2018Ingår i: Student plagiarism in higher education: reflections on teaching practice / [ed] Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2018, s. 123-139Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 17.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Genre analysis2016Ingår i: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2016, s. 243-255Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University.
    Teacher Preparation for Postsecondary Writing2018Ingår i: The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching, New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers of postsecondary writing need internalized knowledge in the areas of the language being taught, writing processes, genre structure and register, the social and political issues associated with writing and academic language generally, and of a range of tasks and teaching strategies. This is best achieved by a loop‐input strategy in which the teacher preparation makes use of the types of task that teachers will have to use themselves for the explicit content they must learn. This allows them to experience the effectiveness or otherwise of the tasks and to reflect on their own reactions to them.

  • 19.
    Shaw, Philip
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Three types of zoological common names and their formation processes 2016Ingår i: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 171-187Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Known biological species have a standard international scientific name, and many species also have more or less fixed common names in one or more languages. We can identify three groups of common names in terms of their form and formation-processes, here called folk, collector, and popularizing. The folk names have long been studied in detail. The collector names have attracted little attention although they show an interesting variety of formation processes and cross-linguistic contrasts reveal interesting social differences. The popularizing names are the most mechanically formed, but the naming patterns reflect interesting aspects of their origin in a nineteenth-century liberal project, in particular nationalism. In this study I examine these types of name and naming process. Comparisons are made among English, French, German, and Swedish, elucidating the formation processes and the differences in word-formation traditions, entomological history, and society they may reflect.

  • 20.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Mežek, Špela
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Engelska på köpet?: Implicit språkinlärning i den parallelspråkiga högskolan2012Ingår i: Resultatdialog 2012, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2012, s. 153-166Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 21.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Mcmillion, Alan
    Stockholm University.
    Reading Comprehension in Advanced L2 Readers2018Ingår i: High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts: / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, s. 146-169Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 22.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholms University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Source use in academic writing: An introduction to the special issue2013Ingår i: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 12, nr 2, s. A1-A3Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 23.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Types of intertextuality in chairman's statements2013Ingår i: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 12, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality is a pervasive feature of all discourse, but norms and conventions vary widely across domains. Academic conventions can cause difficulties for those who have been exposed to, or move on to, domains with other practices. Academic conventions are well documented; here we examine those of business writing. We created a corpus of chairman’s statements from annual corporate reports and searched them for signalled and unsignalled intertextual relationships. We hypothesise that statements from the same company will be linked by both repeated phraseology and acknowledged intertextuality.

  • 24.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Stockholm University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Why so many questions about plagiarism?2018Ingår i: Student Palgiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice / [ed] Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2018, s. 1-11Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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