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  • 1.
    Boldeman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dal, Henrik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Cosco, Nilda
    North Carolina State University.
    Moore, Robin
    North Carolina State University.
    Bieber, Brad
    North Karolina State University.
    Blennow, Margaretha
    Södersjukhuset.
    Pagels, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Söderström, Margareta
    Köpenhamns Universitet.
    Wester, Ulf
    Statens Strålskyddsinstitut.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    SLU.
    Preschool outdoor play environment may combine promotion of childrens physical activity and sun protection. Further evidence from Southern Sweden and North Carolina: Les aires de jeux extérieures en école maternelle peuvent associer promotion de l´activité physique et protection solaire. Noveaux arguments de Suéde du Sud et de Caroline Nord2011In: Science & sports, ISSN 0765-1597, E-ISSN 1778-4131, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 72-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Boldeman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Söderström, Margaretha
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Moore, Robin
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Cosco, Nilda
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Bieber, Brad
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Pagels, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Wester, Ulf
    The Health Promoting Potential of Preschool Outdoor Environments: Linking  Research to Policy2015In: Revisiting social factors: advancing research into people and place / [ed] Lindsay, Georgia; Morhayim, Lusi, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, p. 111-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Boldemann, C
    et al.
    Blennow, Margareta
    Dal, Henrik
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    Raustorp, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Yuen, Katarina
    Wester, Ulf
    Impact of preschool environment upon children's physical activity and sun exposure2006In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Berg, Christina
    University of Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Combinations of Epoch Durations and Cut-Points to Estimate Sedentary Time and Physical Activity Among Adolescents2017In: Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, ISSN 1091-367X, E-ISSN 1532-7841, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 154-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate how combinations of different epoch durations and cut-points affect the estimations of sedentary time and physical activity in adolescents. Accelerometer data from 101 adolescents were derived and 30 combinations were used to estimate sedentary time, light, moderate, vigorous, and combined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Data were analyzed with repeated measurement analyses of variance. Large differences of sedentary time and times of different physical activity intensities were observed between 1 s and longer epoch durations using virtually all cut-points. Generally, sedentary time, moderate physical activity, vigorous physical activity, and combined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity progressively decreased, whereas light physical activity increased with longer epoch durations. The extreme differences between cut-points were large and increased with longer epoch durations for sedentary time and for all physical activity intensities except for vigorous physical activity per epoch duration. Caution is required when cross-comparing studies using different epoch durations and cut-points. To accurately register adolescents’ spontaneous intermittent physical activity behavior, short epoch durations are recommended.

  • 5.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Jonsson, Linus
    University of Gothenburg.
    Berg, Christina
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    University of Gothenburg;Halmstad University.
    Korp, Peter
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg.
    Effects of an Empowerment-Based Health-Promotion School Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time among Adolescents in a Multicultural Area2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 11, article id 2542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity (PA) decreases with age, and interventions are needed to promote PA during adolescence, especially, among those in low-socioeconomic status (SES) areas. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention had any effects on changes in (a) moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), (b) sedentary time (SED), (c) exercise training (ET) frequency, and (d) ET duration, among adolescents. Participants (aged 12-13 years at baseline) from one intervention school and two control schools, were recruited from a multicultural area of Sweden, characterized by low-SES. During the course of the two-year intervention, a total of 135 participants (43% boys) were included in the study. The intervention was developed and implemented as a result of cooperation and shared decision-making among the researchers and the participants. MVPA and SED were measured with accelerometers, and ET frequency and duration was self-reported at the beginning of the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade, respectively. There were no significant effects of the two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention on changes in the accelerometer-measured MVPA and SED, or the self-reported ET frequency and duration, among the adolescents. Overall, the intervention was unsuccessful at promoting PA and reducing SED. Several possible explanations for the intervention's lack of effects are discussed.

  • 6.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg.
    Berg, Christina
    University of Gothenburg.
    Boldenmann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Accelerometer-measured pattern of sedentary time and physical activity among adolescents in a multicultural area characterized by low socioeconomic status2018In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 30, no 3, article id 20160061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe and analyze accelerometer-measured sedentary time and physical activity (PA) among adolescents in a multicultural area characterized by low socioeconomic status (SES).

    METHOD:

    Seventh-graders (n=114 (girls n=66), mean age: 12.8±0.8 y) were recruited from three schools in a multicultural area of the city of Gothenburg, Sweden. Sedentary time and PA were measured with ActiGraph™ accelerometers.

    RESULT:

    Of total wear-time, 70 (±6)% was sedentary, with girls being more sedentary than boys. Girls had less light PA (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) than boys. Similar patterns were shown during in-school and out-of-school hours. During wear-time, 53% had a mean of ≥60 min of MVPA per day, but only 6% of the girls and 24% of the boys were sufficiently physically active every day. Girls had more sedentary bouts of ≥10 min and fewer MVPA bouts of ≥5 min per day than boys. Those who participated in organized sports spent a mean of 15 more minutes of MVPA per day compared to those who did not. No association was observed between body mass index (BMI) and sedentary time and PA.

    CONCLUSION:

    Only a few adolescents from a Swedish multicultural area characterized by low SES met the PA recommendations every day, and girls were more sedentary and less physically active than boys. Adolescents involved in organized sports had more of MVPA per day than their non-involved peers. Sedentary time and PA were not related to BMI.

  • 7.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Raustorp, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klena bevis för att stillasittande ger kardiometabol ohälsa hos unga: »Skräpmat« och sena kvällar framför skärmen del i komplext samband2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112, article id DEREArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent decades there has been a rapidly growing interest in youths’ sedentary behaviour and its association with cardio-metabolic health. Currently there is little-to-no evidence for a cross-sectional and longitudinal association between volume and pattern (bouts and breaks) of objectively measured sedentary behavior and body weight in youth. Likewise, there is little-to-no evidence for a cross-sectional association between volume and pattern of objectively measured sedentary behavior and other markers for cardio-metabolic risk in youth. However, there is sufficient evidence for a cross-sectional and longitudinal association between screen-time and body weight and blood pressure and blood lipids. Furthermore, there is evidence for a cross-sectional association between youths’ screen-time and clustered metabolic risk and insulin resistance. Overall, the level of evidence was low and, therefore, caution is required when interpreting the results.

  • 8.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Raustorp, Anders
    University of Gothenburg.
    Metoder för att minska vuxnas stillasittande2017In: Fysioterapi, ISSN 1653-5804, no 2, p. 28-34Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I takt med den växande kunskapen om stillasittandets potentiella negativa hälsokonsekvenser har flera studier publicerats där forskare utvärderat effekten av interventioner som syftar till att minska stillasittande. Denna artikel sammanfattar forskningsläget kring detta och ger exempel på de metoder som har använts och utvärderats. Resultatet visar att metoder som innebär rekonstruktion av miljö som bland annat höj- och sänkbara arbetsbord och självregleringstekniker som monitorering med stegräkning har varit framgångsrika metoder för att minska stillasittande. Även metoder där problemlösning och tillhandahållande av information ingått har visat sig användbara. Förslag ges på hur fysioterapeuter kan gå till väga vid målformulering samt -utvärdering av insatser för att minska vuxnas stillasittande.

  • 9.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and cardio-metabolic risk in youth: a review of evidence2014In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 173, no 7, p. 845-860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to review studies that examine the association between volume and pattern of objectively measured sedentary behaviour and markers of cardio-metabolic risk in youth. A search for relevant articles was conducted in PubMed and SportDiscus, and the following inclusion criteria were applied: (i) youth participants (age range 6-19); (ii) accelerometer-measured volume and/or pattern of sedentary behaviour and its association with a parts per thousand yen1 cardio-metabolic outcome; and (iii) published, in press or accepted in an English language peer-reviewed journal between January 2000 and October 2013. A total of 45 articles met the a priori criteria and, thus, were considered eligible for inclusion. Although youth accumulate approximately 6 to 8 hof daily sedentary behaviour, little evidence supports an association with individual and clustered cardio-metabolic risk when adjusted for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Conclusion: We suggest that youth should be encouraged to engage in recommended levels of MVPA and reduce excessive time spent in screen-based sedentary behaviour. Future studies should examine the association between volume and pattern of objectively measured sedentarybehaviour and cardio-metabolic risk independent of time spent in MVPA.

  • 10.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Samband mellan stillasittande och ohälsa varierar med mätmetod2016In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 133, article id DU33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Raustorp, Anders
    University of Gothenburg.
    Så påverkas hälsan av vårt stillasittande: En kunskapsöversikt ur ett livsloppsperspektiv2017In: Fysioterapi, ISSN 1653-5804, no 1, p. 26-31Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Pagels, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Levels of Physical Activity during Physical Education lessons in Sweden2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The aim of this study was to measure the percentage of sedentary light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (%MVPA) provided by physical education (PE) lessons for Swedish second, fifth and eighth grade students, aged eight, 11 and 14.

    METHODS:

    We observed 39 PE lessons and divided them into seven lesson categories: ball play, ball games, dance, fitness, playing games, orienteering and gymnastics. Physical activity (PA) during PE was estimated using accelerometers and the height and weight of the children were measured.

    RESULTS:

    We studied 149 children: 63 in the second grade, 66 in the fifth grade and 19 in the eighth grade. On average, 25% of the PE lessons were spent in MVPA and the mean %MVPA varied with the lesson content, with fitness, orienteering and playing games being the most intense. The highest %MVPA was in the fitness category, providing 33% (8-62%) for girls and 37% (7-72%) for boys. With the exception of the second grade, no significant gender differences in %MVPA were seen.

    CONCLUSION:

    The content of Swedish PE lessons affected the %MVPA in all age groups. In some content, individuals reached two-thirds of their daily PA recommendations, highlighting the potential that PE contributes to public health goals.

  • 13. Harms-Ringdahl, Karin
    et al.
    Ekholm, Jan
    Karlsson, Ann-Marie
    Raustorp, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Toresson, H-G
    Svensson, Tomas
    Pain Assessment with Different Intensity Scales in Response to Loading of Joint Structures.1986In: Pain, Vol. 27;401-411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University ; Linköping City Council.
    Physical Activity, Blood Glucose and C-Peptide in Healthy School-Children, a Longitudinal Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0156401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To further elucidate the relationship between physical activity and several risk factors for development of diabetes (glucose, C-peptide and obesity) over time. Methods A prospective longitudinal study where physical activity was measured on 199 children from Kalmar and Linkoping at age 8, and the same 107 children from Linkoping again at age 12. Anthropometric data was collected and blood was analyzed for C-peptide and f-glucose. The children in the study were representative for the general Swedish child population, and on an average lean. Results High physical activity was related to lower C-peptide at age 8 and 12. This correlation was especially pronounced in boys, who also were more physically active than girls at both time points. The association seen at 8 years of age was similar at age 12 in most children. Children with higher BMI Z-Score had a higher fasting C-peptide (age 12) but linear regression showed that children with more steps per day were less likely to have a higher fasting C-peptide irrespective of BMI. Longitudinal follow-up showed that a decrease in physical activity increased insulin resistance and beta-cell load. Conclusions Already in young children, physical activity improves insulin sensitivity and decreases the need of C-peptide over time. This seems to become even more pronounced with increasing age when children are followed longitudinally. Low physical activity increases the load on insulin producing beta-cells, might increase the risk for both type 1- and 2 diabetes.

  • 15.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sternudd, Catarina
    Lund University.
    Kyhlin, Maria
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Attitudinal antecedents of childrens sustainable every day mobility2011In: Studies on mobility and transport research 3: Transport and health issues / [ed] Werner Gronau, Karl Reiter, Robert Pressl, Mannheim: Verlag MetaGISInfosysteme , 2011, Vol. 3, p. 55-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kahlin, Yvonne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Werner, Suzanne
    Karolinska Institutet ; Sophiahemmet.
    Edman, Gunnar
    Tiohundra AB.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Physical self-esteem and personality traits in Swedish physically inactive female high school students: an intervention study2016In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 363-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity provides fundamental health benefits and plays a positive role in physical well-being. The aim of this present study was to investigate whether a 6-month physical activity program could influence physical self-esteem and frequency of physical activity in physically inactive female high school students in short- and long-term periods and whether personality traits were related to physical activity behaviour and compliance with the program. METHODS: The study was a cluster-randomised controlled intervention study including 104 physically inactive female high school students aged 16-19 years, 60 females in an intervention group and 44 females in a control group. The intervention group exercised at sport centres at least once per week during a 6-month period. Questionnaires were used for evaluation. RESULTS: At a 6-month follow up, the intervention group improved physical self-perception in all subdomains and significantly improved physical condition, physical self-worth and self-related health compared to the control group. At 1-year follow up, 25 females out of 53 females were still physically active, and all ratings remained almost the same as at the 6-month follow up. There were no particular personality traits that were dominant in the groups. CONCLUSION: A 6-month physical activity program can positively influence physical self-esteem and the frequency of physical activity, both from a short- and long-term perspective.

  • 17.
    Ludvigsson, J.
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Huus, K.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Akerman, L.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Physical activity, blood glucose and C-peptide in healthy school children: a substudy of the prospective longitudinal ABIS cohort2013In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 56, p. S279-S279Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Matthiessen, Jeppe
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knudsen, Vibeke Kildegaard
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Sorensen, Mette Rosenlund
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Reduction in pedometer-determined physical activity in the adult Danish population from 2007 to 20122015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To examine the development in pedometer-determined physical activity from 2007-2008 to 2011-2012 in the adult Danish population. Methods: The study population comprised two random samples of 18-75-year-old individuals who took part in cross-sectional studies in 2007-2008 (n=224) and 2011-2012 (n=1515). Pedometer data (sealed Yamax SW 200) were obtained for seven consecutive days. Data for 1624 participants (48.2% men) were included in the analysis. An overall step-defined activity level was examined based on a graduated step index (sedentary, low active, somewhat active, active, highly active). The pedometer-determined outcomes were analysed using regression models. Results: A borderline significant decline (p=0.077) from 8788 to 8341 steps/day (-446 (95% confidence intervals -50, 943)) was found between 2007-2008 and 2011-2012. Furthermore, a 23.7% (95% confidence intervals -41.7%, -0.1%) lower overall step-defined activity level was observed in 2011-2012 compared to 2007-2008. These changes were primarily due to a reduced level of activity among women. The proportion of individuals taking 10,000 steps/day decreased non-significantly from 34.8% to 29.3%, whereas the proportion taking <5000 steps/day did not differ between survey periods. Conclusions: This nationally representative survey suggests an overall reduction in the physical activity level among Danish adults. The reduction was due to a shift in the population distribution from higher to lower levels of activity. If this shift is true, it is worrying from a public health perspective. Our study result needs, however, to be confirmed by other population studies.

  • 19.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jansson, Märit
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lund University.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Göteborgs Universitet.
    Kyhlin, Maria
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska institutet.
    The role of greenery for physical active play at school grounds2014In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 103-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Greenery is assumed to promote physical activity at school grounds by facilitating open and flexible play situations that engage many children. The role of greenery for school ground activity was investigated at two schools, one of which contained a substantial amount of greenery and the other one little greenery. All in all 197 children from 4th (10–11 years) and 6th grade (12–13 years), were involved in a one week field study, documenting self-reported school ground use, their favourite places and favourite activities and counting their steps by pedometer. The most common school ground activities were related to the use of balls as part of different sports, games and other playful activity. The more extensive green areas belonged to children's favourite places, but were little used, whereas settings with a mix of green and built elements in proximity to buildings were well-used favourites. Physical activity in steps was similar at the two schools, but on average girls got less of the activity they need during recess. Greenery was found important by contributing to settings attractive to visit for girls as well as boys and for younger as well as older children, if located in ways that also supported peer interaction and various games.

  • 20.
    Pagels, Peter
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Comparison of pedometer and accelerometer measures on physical activity in preschool children 3-5 years of age2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 116-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Pagels, Peter
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Göteborgs Universitet.
    Att studera förskolebarns fysiska aktivitet2013In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 510-517Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förskolebarns fysiska aktivitet har en viktig hälsopromotiv effekt mot flera av våra välfärdssjukdomar. Därför är det av yttersta vikt att förskolemiljön stimulerar förskolebarnen till en hälsosam fysisk aktivitet. I Kidscape projektet studerade vi förskolebarns fysiska aktivitet under vistelsen på förskolan. Syftet var att hitta faktorer i skolgårdens utemiljö som påverkar barnens aktivitetsmönster. Aktivitetsmönstret studerades med både subjektiva (CARS och kvalitativ observation) och objektiva metoder (pedometri och accelerometri). Resultatet visade att förskolebarnens fysiska aktivitet var högre i förskolor med en bra skolgårdsmiljö. Slutsats: förskole gårdens utformning kan främja en hälsosam fysisk aktivitet hos förskolebarn.

  • 22.
    Pagels, Peter
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Archer, Trevor
    Inst för Psykologi, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Lidman, Ulf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Influence of moderate, daily,physical activity upon body composition and blood lipid profile in swedish adults2012In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 9, p. 867-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health organizations suggest that adults ought to engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity daily physical activity. This study investigated the effects of a 30-minute single daily bout of brisk walking upon risk factors for CHD with blood lipid profile in particular. Methods: Thirty-three (25-45 y) adults, were randomly assigned into an exercise group (EG) (n=16, (9w) and a control group (CG) (n=17 (6w). The EG walked briskly 30 minutes daily during the 3 weeks test period. Compliance/adherence was maximal throughout the 3-week intervention due to stringent daily monitoring. Results: The EG showed a significant decrease in concentrations of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC) during the intervention period. A significant inverse correlation between Δ energy expenditure/day and Δ LDL-C (r = -0.39, P<0.05) and an improvement in weight and BMI in the EG was found. Average steps during 30 minutes brisk walking bout was 3669 steps/bout generating a mean energy expenditure of 191 kcal/bout. Conclusions: The most unique findings were that daily single bouts of moderate-intensity physical activity for 30 minutes, during 3 weeks, induced favourable effects upon body weight, BMI and blood concentration of LDL-C and TC in healthy adults.

  • 23.
    Pagels, Peter
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    De Leon, Antonio Ponce
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Martensson, Fredrika
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Kylin, Maria
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet ; Stockholm County Council.
    A repeated measurement study investigating the impact of school outdoor environment upon physical activity across ages and seasons in Swedish second, fifth and eighth graders2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, article id 803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: School children are confined to and exposed to outdoor environment that happens to be at their disposal during compulsory school time. The health-promoting potential of outdoor environment, and the use of it, is therefore important. We have studied the impact of school outdoor environment in terms of playground features, space, topography and vegetation upon the patterns of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) across ages and seasons in Swedish pupils at compulsory school. Methods: Four schools in the Middle and Southern parts of Sweden, with outdoor environments differing in playground features, space, topography and vegetation were analyzed during one school year. A sample of 196 children was drawn from eligible pupils in grades 2, 5 and 8, aged 7-14 years. PA was monitored with time-stamped Actigraph accelerometers GT3X+, measuring different intensity levels during outdoor time. Maps were used to mark places where the children stayed and what they did during outdoor time. Results: Mean MVPA during outdoor stay was 39 minutes for the entire school year, time in MVPA correlated positively with outdoor time, as did MVPA with used outdoor play area (p < 0.001). Outdoor MVPA declined with age, boys accumulated more MVPA than girls at all ages (p < 0.001). Ball play areas increased MVPA in 5th graders in September and May (p < 0.001). Overall, ball play areas increased 5th graders' relative MVPA, and helped maintaining it with increasing age in boys but not in girls, whereas woodland stimulated and contributed to maintaining girls' MVPA with increasing age. Outdoor temperature significantly impacted (p < 0.01) MVPA throughout all seasons. Conclusion: We conclude that school outdoor environment design and outdoor play time impact physical activity on a daily basis and may contribute to increasing girls' physical activity and moderate the sharp decline in physical activity by age. The school outdoor environment may thus be a potential health promoter during school time.

  • 24.
    Pagels, Peter
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Guban, Peter
    Stockholm County Council.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Compulsory school in- and outdoors: implications for school children’s physical activity and health during one academic year2016In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 1-11, article id 699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regulated school days entail less free-living physical activity (PA) and outdoor stay, which may jeopardize the opportunities for cohesive moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and, by extension, children’s health. The role of outdoor stay during school time for pupils’ free-living PA vs. physical education (PE) and indoor stay was studied during one academic year in 196 pupils aged 7–14 years at four schools in mid-southern Sweden during five consecutive days each in September, March, and May. Actigraph GT3X+ Activity monitors were used. Predictors for PA during school stay were expressed as mean daily accelerometer counts and were measured per season, day, grade, gender, weather, and time outdoors. Overall, free-living PA outdoors generated the highest mean accelerometer counts for moderate and vigorous PA. Outdoor PA and PE, representing 23.7% of the total school time contributed to 50.4% of total mean accelerometer counts, and were the greatest contributors to moderate and vigorous PA. Age and weather impacted PA, with less PA in inclement weather and among older pupils. More time outdoors, at all seasons, would favorably increase school children’s chances of reaching recommended levels of PA.

  • 25.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Eight years secular trend of perceived physical self-esteem among Swedish young adolescents2010In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 237-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Göteborgs universitet.
    Fysisk aktivitet och Fysisk självkänsla2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Hur mycket fysisk aktivitet ger en idrottslektion?2011In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 66-69Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idrottslektionens bidrag till fysisk aktivitet på måttligt till intensiv nivåär omfattande. Den är en viktig hälsofaktor för både pojkar och flickoroch inte minst för deras hjärt-kärlhälsa. Särskilt viktig tycks den varaför de mindre aktiva skolbarnen.

  • 28.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Integrating evidence based pedometry for adolescents into the physical activity on prescription (PAP) model in Sweden2018In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 15, no 10, p. S223-S223Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Physical activity, Body Composition and Physical Self-Esteem among children and adolescents2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Archer, Trevor
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Svensson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Perlinger, Thommy
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Physical self esteem- A five year follow up study on Swedish adolescents.2009In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 497-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the levels and inter-correlations of physical self-esteem, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and body fat and, in addition, distinctive of individuals with high vs. low physical self-worth in a longitudinal design during adolescence.

    METHODS:

    At mean ages 12.7, 15.7, and 17.7 years, physical activity (steps/day) was measured for four consecutive schooldays of 77 (41 girls) Swedish adolescents. Perceived physical self-esteem, height, weight, and at ages 15.7 and 17.7 years, body fat percent was also measured.

    RESULTS:

    Boys' physical self-perception scores were higher than girls' and an overall stability during adolescents was seen. High and low physical self-worth had a significant impact regarding BMI at ages 12.7 and 17.7 years and regarding body fat at age 17.7 years in both boys and girls.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Regression analysis indicated that BMI and body fat counter-predicted self-worth in girls age-dependently. Efforts to build adapted physical activity programs for overweight and obese are emphasized.

     

  • 31.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lunds Universitet.
    Objectively measured physical activity during a Physical Education lesson. A pilot study2010In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 469-476Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Karolinska Institutet / University of Gothenburg.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    SLU.
    Sternudd, Caharina
    Lunds Universitet.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lunds Universitet.
    Translating cycling into steps. The share of cycling in 10-year olds daily physical activity2013In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 171-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Active travel has a potential to increase children’s physical activity (PA). Pedometers offer a valid option to measure PA, but do not capture cycling activity. Children’s self-reported cycling distances can be analyzed by the Geografic Information System (GIS).

    Aim: To combine pedometry and GIS mapping to identify the relative amount of cycling in children’s PA.

    Study group: Of all children in 4th grade (n=187) in Staffanstorp Sweden, 144 had valid pedometer data. Fifty-six children were non-cyclists while 88 children (32 boys, 47 girls, 9 gender unknown) reported at least one cycle journey.

    Methods: Cycle trips were entered into GIS and calculated to total cycling distance. Average length of the single distances cycled per day was 676 m (SD=534 m). A previously reported cycling speed (13.5 km/h) was used to calculate time spent cycling. Consequently distance=676 m, speed=13.5 km/h=13,500 m/3600 s=3.75 m/s and time=676m/3.75m/s=180.26 s=3 min. Expenditure of 4 and 5 metabolic equivalents (METs) has in children been reported equivalent to 122 and 127 steps/min, respectively. We estimated 4.7 METs (13.5 km/h) as 126 steps for every min of cycling (127–122=5×0.7=125.5).

    Results: The daily mean cycle distance was 676 m, on average 379 additional steps/day for cycling children (min. 21, max. 1385, SD=299) with no gender difference. Additional “steps” obtained by cycling corresponded to on average 3% of their PA.

    Conclusion: The relative contribution of cycling in 10-year-old children’s PA level is quite small and stable between children across different levels of activity levels, regardless of gender.

  • 33.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Växjö University.
    Ekroth, Yvonne
    Eight-Year Secular Trends of Pedometer-Determined Physical Activity in Young Swedish Adolescents2009In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 369-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To explore the secular trends (time change) of pedometer-determined physical activity (steps per day) in Swedish young adolescents 13 to 14 years of age from 2000 to 2008. Methods: The study was analyzed between 2 cross-sectional cohorts carried out in October 2000 (235, 111 girls) and October 2008 (186, 107 girls) in the same school, using identical procedures. Data of mean steps per day were collected during 4 consecutive weekdays (sealed pedometer Yamax SW-200 Tokyo, Japan) and in addition height and weight were measured. Results: When comparing cohort 2000 with cohort 2008 no significant difference in physical activity were found neither among girls (12,989 vs 13,338 [t = –0.98, P < .325]) nor boys (15,623 vs 15,174 [t = 0.78, P = .436]). The share of girls and boys meeting weight control recommendations was none significantly higher in 2008 both among girls (68% versus 62%) and among boys (69% versus 65%). Conclusion: There was no significant difference of young adolescents’ physical activity during school weekdays in 2008 compared with 2000. This stabilized physical activity level, in an internationally comparison regarded as high, is promising. Enhanced focus on physical activity in society and at school might have influenced the result.

  • 34.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ekroth, Yvonne
    Oscarsgymnasiet - Oskarshamn.
    Tracking of Pedometer-Determined Physical Activity: A 10-Year Follow-Up Study From Adolescence to Adulthood in Sweden2013In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1186-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tracking refers to the tendency for an individual to maintain their rank within a group over time.

    Purpose: To identify levels of pedometer determined physical activity and explore tracking over 10-year follow up period. Methods: In October of 2000, 2003, 2005, and 2010, data of physical activity as steps/day was measured with Yamax SW-200 Tokyo, Japan for 4 consecutive schooldays in 40 (19 females) Swedish individuals (mean age 12.7 in 2000).

    Results: In boys a decrease of mean step/day occurred between baseline and the 3-year (P < .001), the 5-year (P < .001) and the 10-year follow-up (P < .014). A significant moderate tracking occurred in those at baseline classified insufficient active, both over the 3- to 5-year span (r(s) = 0.56, P = .005) and the 0- to 10-year span (r(s) = 0.47, P = .05).

    Conclusion: The significant decrease of physical activity, as steps/day, in males at early adolescent seems to level out during late adolescence and early adulthood. Further, youth classified insufficient active according to published BMI reference standards at the baseline measures showed a significant moderate tracking over the 10-year follow-up period.

  • 35.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Tracking of pedometer-determined physical activity. A 16 year follow-up study.2018In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aims of this study were to explore the effect of time and long-termed tracking on pedometer-determined physical activity (PA) from early adolescent to the 30s. Methods: PA was measured with pedometers [Yamax™ (SW-200)] during 2000 (time 1), 2003 (time 2), 2005 (time 3), 2010 (time 4), and 2016 (time 5). Anthropometric data were collected during time 1. Data from 59 participants (n = 32 males) were analyzed from early adolescent (time 1) to the 30s (time 5). Results:There was an effect of time for males (P = .005, η2 = .76) and females (P = .002, η2 = .50) where steps per day decreased. Males steps per day tracked between time 1 and time 2 (r = .41, P = .021), time 1 and time 3 (r = .38, P = .03), time 3 and time 4 (r = .42, P = .015), and time 4 and time 5 (r = .50, P = .003). Females steps per day tracked between time 4 and time 5 (r = .39, P = .04). Males took more steps per day than females during time 1 (P = .018), whereas females took more steps per day during time 2 (P = .043) and time 3 (P = .03). Conclusion: There was a significant effect of time, where steps per day decreased between the 5 times of measurement. Steps per day tracked low to moderate in the short time span, yet tracked nonsignificantly from early adolescent to the 30s.

  • 36.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Physical self-esteem: a ten year follow-up study from early adolescence to early adulthood2015In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: One variable that has been consistently associated with adolescents’ physical activity is perceived activity competence. Perceived physical (or sport) competence is considered a sub-domain to the physical self-esteem or self-worth (i.e., a person’s valuation of what is good and worthy in their self-description).

    Objective: This study aimed to describe levels of and inter-correlations among physical self-esteem, physical activity, and body mass index in a longitudinal design spanning adolescence to early adulthood.

    Materials and methods: At mean ages of 12.7, 15.7, 17.7 and 22.7 years, we measured perceived physical self-esteem in 39 (22 boys) Swedish adolescents. Physical activity (steps/day) for four consecutive schooldays, height, and weight were also measured.

    Results: No significant difference between the four time points for any variable of perceived physical self-esteem was seen, neither in boys nor girls. In general, all physical self-variables revealed non-linear trajectories across time, where the general trend was an increase during the younger ages followed by a decrease during older ages. At ages 12 and 15 years in boys and girls physical condition and physical strength as well as body attractiveness and physical strength, respectively, had the strongest correlations to physical self-esteem. At age 17 and 22 years sports competence had the strongest correlation to self-esteem in girls, while body attractiveness and physical strength had the strongest correlation to self-esteem in boys.

    Conclusion: An overall stability in physical self-esteem was found. However the impact of a sub-domain upon physical self-esteem vary during adolescence and early adulthood. Such information may be useful when creating physical activity programs that support and develop physical self-esteem.

  • 37.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Secular trends of pedometer determined physical activity in swedish school children2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 12, p. 1824-1828Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Mattsson, Eva
    Svensson, Kjell
    Ståhle, Agneta
    Physical Activity, Body Composition and Physical self-Esteem- A three year follow- up of adolescents in Sweden2006In: Scand J Med Sci Sports, Vol. 16, p. 258-266Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Pagels, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Cosco, Nilda
    North Carolina State University.
    Söderström, Margareta
    Köpenhamns Universitet.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    SLU.
    Accelerometer measured level of physical activity indoors and outdoors during preschool time in Sweden and the United States2012In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 801-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is important to understand the correlates of physical activity (PA) to influence policy and create environments that promote PA among preschool children. We compared preschoolers' PA in Swedish and in US settings and objectively examined differences boys' and girls' indoor and outdoor PA regarding different intensity levels and sedentary behavior. Methods: Accelerometer determined PA in 50 children with mean age 52 months, (range 40-67) was recorded during preschool time for 5 consecutive weekdays at 4 sites. The children wore an Actigraph GTIM Monitor. Results: Raleigh preschool children, opposite to Malmo preschoolers spent significantly more time indoors than outdoors (P < .001). Significantly more moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) was observed outdoors (P < .001) in both settings. Malmo children accumulated significantly more counts/min indoors (P < .001). The percent of MVPA during outdoor time did not differ between children at Raleigh and Malmo. Conclusion: Physical activity counts/minutes was significantly higher outdoors vs. indoors in both Malmo and Raleigh. Malmo preschoolers spent 47% of attendance time outdoors compared with 18% for Raleigh preschoolers which could have influenced the difference in preschool activity between the 2 countries. Time spent in MVPA at preschool was very limited and predominantly adopted outdoors.

  • 40.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pagels, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Physical activity decreased by a quarter in the 11-12 year old Swedish boys between 2000 and 2013 but was stable in girls. A smartphone effect?2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 8, p. 808-814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ¨AimThis study explored physical activity, body mass index (BMI) and overweight and obesity from 2000 to 2013 using a convenience sample of second- and fifth-grade Swedish schoolchildren aged 8-9years and 11-12years, respectively. MethodsWe examined cross-sectional cohorts of 126 second-grade children in 2000, 84 in 2006 and 44 in 2013 and 105 fifth-grade children in 2000 and 38 in 2013. No fifth graders were available in 2006. Physical activity data were collected based on pedometer readings over four consecutive weekdays, and height and weight were measured. Identical instruments and procedures were used in all three years. ResultsThere was an increase in physical activity in second-grade girls from 2000 to 2006 (p<0.01), which then stabilised between 2006 and 2013, but second-grade boys and fifth-grade girls were stable throughout the study period. Fifth-grade boys decreased significantly (24%) from 16670 to 12704 steps per day (p<0.01) from 2000 to 2013. Mean BMI scores remained stable over time. ConclusionTime trends in physical activity differed between boys and girls. Second-grade boys and fifth-grade girls were stable throughout, whereas second-grade girls increased from 2000 to 2006 before stabilising. Fifth-grade boys showed a significant 24% reduction from 2000 to 2013. Changes in recess and leisure time habits, such as smartphone use, may have influenced the result.

  • 41.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Pangrazi, RP
    Ståhle, A
    Physical activity and BMI levels among school children in southeastern sweden2004In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 400-404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Ståhle, Agneta
    Gudasic, Helena
    Kinnunen, Anneli
    Mattsson, Eva
    Physical activity and self-perception in school children assessed with the Children and Youth - Physical Self-Perception Profile2005In: Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, Vol. 15 (2), p. 126-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Carl Johan
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The Evolution of Physical Activity on Prescription (FaR) in Sweden2014In: Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Sportmedizin und Sporttraumatologie, ISSN 1422-0644, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 23-25Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1996, the first Report of the US Surgeon General on Physical Activity and Health provided an extensive knowledge overview about the positive effects of physical activity (PA) on several health outcomes and PA recommendations. This contributed to an enhanced interest for PA in Sweden. The Swedish Professional Associations for Physical Activity (YFA) were appointed to form a Scientific Expert Group in the project “Sweden on the Move” and YFA created the idea of Physical Activity on Prescription (FaR) and the production of a handbook (FYSS) for healthcare professionals. In Swedish primary care, licensed healthcare professionals, i.e. physicians, physiotherapists and nurses, can prescribe PA if they have sufficient knowledge about the patient’s current state of health, how PA can be used for promotion, prevention and treatment and are trained in patient-centred counselling and the FaR method. The prescription is followed individually or by visiting local FaR providers. These include sport associations, patient organisations, municipal facilities, commercial providers such as gyms, sports clubs and walking clubs or other organisations with FaR educated staff such as health promoters or personal trainers. In clinical practice, the FaR method increases the level of PA in primary care patients, at 6 and at 12 months. Self-reported adherence to the prescription was 65% at 6 months, similar to the known compliance for medications. In a randomised controlled trial, FaR significantly improved body composition and reduced metabolic risk factors. It is suggested that a successful implementation of PA in healthcare depends on a combination of a systems approach (socio-ecological model) and the strengthening of individual motivation and capability. General support from policymakers, healthcare leadership and professional associations is important. To lower barriers, tools for implementation and structures for delivery must be readily available. Examples include handbooks such as FYSS, the FaR system and the use of pedometers.

  • 44.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Svensson, Kjell
    Perlinger, Thommy
    Tracking of pedometer determined physical activity. A five year follow-up study of adolescents in Sweden2007In: Pediatric Exercise Science, ISSN 0899-8493, E-ISSN 1543-2920, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 228-238Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Rothausen, BW
    et al.
    Danish Technical University, National Food Institute.
    Gille, MB
    Danish Technical University, National Food Institute.
    Biltoft-Jensen, A
    Danish Technical University, National Food Institute.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Matthiesen, J
    Danish Technical University, National Food Institute.
    Testing of simple objectivemeasurments for assessment of physical activity  and antropometry in The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2007-20082010Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Rothausen, BW
    et al.
    Danish Technical University Inst of Nutrition.
    Gille, MB
    Danish Technical University Inst of Nutrtion.
    Biltoft-Jensen, A
    Danish Technical University Inst of Nutrition.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Matthiessen, J
    Danish Technical University Inst of Nutrition.
    Afprövning af simple objektive mål til vurdering af fysisk aktivitet og antroprometri i Den nationale undersögelse av danskernes kostvaner og fysisk aktivitet 2007-20082010Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Söderström, Margareta
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sahlin, Ullrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Blennow, Margareta
    Karolinska Institute.
    The quality of the outdoor environment influences childrens health- a cross sectional study of preschools2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To test how the quality of the outdoor environment of child day care centres (DCCs) influences children's health. Methods The environment was assessed using the Outdoor Play Environmental Categories (OPEC) tool, time spent outdoors and physical activity as measured by pedometer. 172/253 (68%) of children aged 3.05.9 from nine DCCs participated in Southern Sweden. Health data collected were body mass index, waist circumference, saliva cortisol, length of night sleep during study, and symptoms and well-being which were scored (1-week diary 121 parent responders). Also, parent-rated well-being and health of their child were scored (questionnaire, 132 parent responders). MANOVA, ANOVA and principal component analyses were performed to identify impacts of the outdoor environment on health. Results High-quality outdoor environment at DCCs is associated with several health aspects in children such as leaner body, longer night sleep, better well-being and higher mid-morning saliva cortisol levels. Conclusion The quality of the outdoor environment at DCCs influenced the health and well-being of preschool children and should be given more attention among health care professionals and community planners.

  • 48. Tudor Locke, Catrine
    et al.
    P Pangrazi, Rpbert
    Corbin, Charles
    Rutherford, William
    Vincent, Sue
    Raustorp, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Cuddihy, Tom
    Thomson, Michaud
    BMI-referenced standards for recommended pedometer determined steps/day in children2004In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 38, p. 857-864Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49. Tudor-Locke, Catrine
    et al.
    Bassett Jr, D.R
    Rutherford, W.J
    Ainsworth, B.E.
    Chan, C.B.
    Croteau, K.
    Giles-Corti, B.
    Le Masurier, G.
    Moreau, J.
    Mrozek, J.
    Oppert, JM
    Raustorp, Anders
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Strath, S.J.
    Thompson, D
    Whitt-Glover, M.C.
    Wilde, B
    Wojcik, J.R.
    BMI referenced cut points for pedometer determined steps/day in adults2008In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 5, no Suppl 1, p. 126-S139Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Tudor-Locke, Catrine
    et al.
    Pennington Biomedical Research Center, USA ; Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, Canada.
    Craig, Cora L.
    Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, Canada ; University of Sydney, Australia.
    Beets, Michael W.
    University of South Carolina, USA.
    Belton, Sahrajane
    Dublin City University, UK.
    Cardon, Greet M.
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Duncan, Scott
    Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.
    Hatano, Yoshiro
    Tokyo Gakugei University, Japan.
    Lubans, David L.
    University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Olds, Timoty S.
    University of South Australia, Australia.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Rowe, David A.
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Spence, John C.
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Tanaka, Shigeho
    National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Japan.
    Blair, Steven N.
    University of South Carolina, USA.
    How many steps/day are enough? For Children and Adolescents2011In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 8, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide, public health physical activity guidelines include special emphasis on populations of children (typically 6-11 years) and adolescents (typically 12-19 years). Existing guidelines are commonly expressed in terms of frequency, time, and intensity of behaviour. However, the simple step output from both accelerometers and pedometers is gaining increased credibility in research and practice as a reasonable approximation of daily ambulatory physical activity volume. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review existing child and adolescent objectively monitored step-defined physical activity literature to provide researchers, practitioners, and lay people who use accelerometers and pedometers with evidence-based translations of these public health guidelines in terms of steps/day. In terms of normative data (i.e., expected values), the updated international literature indicates that we can expect 1) among children, boys to average 12,000 to 16,000 steps/day and girls to average 10,000 to 13,000 steps/day; and, 2) adolescents to steadily decrease steps/day until approximately 8,000-9,000 steps/day are observed in 18-year olds. Controlled studies of cadence show that continuous MVPA walking produces 3,300-3,500 steps in 30 minutes or 6,600-7,000 steps in 60 minutes in 10-15 year olds. Limited evidence suggests that a total daily physical activity volume of 10,000-14,000 steps/day is associated with 60-100 minutes of MVPA in preschool children (approximately 4-6 years of age). Across studies, 60 minutes of MVPA in primary/elementary school children appears to be achieved, on average, within a total volume of 13,000 to 15,000 steps/day in boys and 11,000 to 12,000 steps/day in girls. For adolescents (both boys and girls), 10,000 to 11,700 may be associated with 60 minutes of MVPA. Translations of time- and intensity-based guidelines may be higher than existing normative data (e.g., in adolescents) and therefore will be more difficult to achieve (but not impossible nor contraindicated). Recommendations are preliminary and further research is needed to confirm and extend values for measured cadences, associated speeds, and MET values in young people; continue to accumulate normative data (expected values) for both steps/day and MVPA across ages and populations; and, conduct longitudinal and intervention studies in children and adolescents required to inform the shape of step-defined physical activity dose-response curves associated with various health parameters.

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