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  • 1.
    Bergren, Caroline
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Salminen Karlsson, Minna
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Peterson, Helen
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Morley, Louise
    Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (Cheer), UK.
    Equity in the neoliberalised Swedish university?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Brodin, Eva
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Frick, Liezel
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    McKenna, Sioux
    Rhodes University, South Africa.
    Innovation, collaboration, and gender in national policies and guidelines on doctoral education: Shapes from Sweden and South Africa in the 21st century2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, the European Research Area (ERA) outlined several principles of innovative doctoral training such as research excellence; exposure to industry and other relevant employment sectors; transferable skills training; and quality assurance (Vittorio 2015). Similar policies and guidelines can also be found in doctoral education across the globe, where the request for innovation and societal collaboration is urgent (e.g. Association of American Universities 1998/2017; Australian Council of Learned Academies 2016; HEQSF 2013; Swedish Government Bill, 2008, 2009, 2016). At the same time, it is known that the general conditions for innovation vary across countries (Meeus & Edquist 2006), and that global policy trends are construed and organised differently at national level in doctoral education (Andres et al. 2015). Combined with the fact that gender differences have been found in many studies on doctoral education in general (Jones 2013), it is significant to ask: What are the contextual and gendered conditions for doctoral students to develop their innovative and collaborative capability?

     

    In our first approach to this problem field, we will present preliminary results from our analysis of some conditions at macro level in Sweden and South Africa. From a comparative perspective, we will elucidate how expressions of innovation, societal collaboration, gender and related concepts have occurred and converged in their national policies and guidelines on doctoral education in the 21st century. We will use summative content analysis for analysing data, which implies an interpretative process of “identifying and quantifying certain words or content in a text with the purpose of understanding the contextual use of the words or content” (Hsieh & Shannon 2005, p. 1283).

     

    Comparing Swedish and South African doctoral education is well justified. Doctoral education is highlighted as a means to increased innovation and collaboration with society in the national policies of both countries. However, they also differ in their organisation of doctoral education, and their societal needs (e.g. for the South African context, see: National Planning Commission 2011). We assume that these differences should reflect nationally diverse ways to conceptualise innovation, societal collaboration, gender and related concepts in policy documents on doctoral education. Also, such a comparative perspective enables deeper understanding of the contextual conditions in Swedish doctoral education.

     

    For the purpose of this conference, we will delimit our literature review to Swedish studies on doctoral education. While such studies are generally rare (Elmgren et al. 2015), they are almost non-existent in relation to innovation and collaboration. Some of these studies are rather focused on research policies and institutional conditions in general (Langfeldt et al. 2015; Stensaker & Benner 2013), than on doctoral education per se. Others are more concerned with doctoral students’ conditions for societal collaboration in practice (Andræ Thelin 2009; Bienowska & Klofsten 2012; Heldal 2016; Lundqvist & Benner 2012; Bienkowska, Klofsten and Rasmussen 2016; Wallgren 2007). However, when it comes to studies on innovation, there is dearth in the research literature. But we do know that doctoral students’ creativity is not always encouraged (Brodin 2015, 2016, 2017), and that other scholars have expressed similar concerns (Wingren 2015). Such results matters, as meta-analyses show a strong correlation between individuals’ creativity and innovation and also that contextual factors influence their innovative output (Sarooghi, Libaers & Burkemper 2015). We also know that concepts such as independence, critical thinking, and communication skills are frequently associated with innovation and collaboration (Cobo 2013). Thus our will include such related concepts in our analysis.  

     

    This conference contribution aims at distributing our study to a Swedish audience, while the same results will be presented at the international Quality in Postgraduate Research conference (QPR) in Adelaide, 17-19 April 2018.

  • 3.
    Brodin, Eva
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Frick, Liezel
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    McKenna, Sioux
    Rhodes University, South Africa.
    Issues on innovation, societal collaboration, and gender in doctoral education: Their historical appearances and relationships in Sweden and South Africa2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, the European Research Area (ERA) outlined several principles of innovative doctoral training such as research excellence; exposure to industry and other relevant employment sectors; transferable skills training; and quality assurance (Vittorio, 2015). Similar policies and guidelines can also be found in doctoral education across the globe, where the request for innovation and societal collaboration is urgent (e.g. Association of American Universities, 1998/2017; Australian Council of Learned Academies, 2016; HEQSF, 2013; Swedish Government Bill, 2008, 2016). At the same time, it is known that the general conditions for innovation vary across countries (Meeus & Edquist, 2006), and that global policy trends are construed and organised differently at national level in doctoral education (Andres et al., 2015). Furthermore, studies have shown that doctoral students’ inter-sectorial work could be hindered by the fact that the universities are not always near to knowledge-intensive industries, or that the industry is ill prepared to make use of the doctoral students’ qualifications (Vittorio, 2015). Combined with the fact that gender differences have been found in a number studies on doctoral education in general (Jones, 2013), it is accordingly significant to ask: What are the contextual and gendered conditions for doctoral students to develop their innovative and collaborative capability? Current research has no satisfying answer to this complex question yet. Against this background, our conference contribution is founded in a newly started project entitled "Developing innovative and collaborative capability in doctoral education from a gender perspective: Conditions, processes and outcomes in Sweden and South Africa". Based on social rule theory (Burns & Carson, 2002), we assume that learning practices are governed by a range of social rules founded in policies, organisational leadership, scholarly norms, and societal stakeholders. In particular, we are interested in how diverse levels of the doctoral educational system are related (or not) to each other, and how different systems affect the students’ innovative and collaborative development. While our overall project consists of several self-contained but interrelated studies to fulfil this holistic and systems theoretical approach, the first part of our study, reported on here, focuses on the macro level only by analysing national policies and guidelines related to doctoral education. Hence, based on summative content analysis (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005), this conference contribution will illuminate how the expressions of innovation, societal collaboration, gender and related concepts have occurred, converged and developed over time in Swedish and South African national policies on doctoral education from 1970-2017. Certain attention will be given to differences and similarities in these regards when comparing the two nations. Comparing Swedish and South African doctoral education is well justified. In contrast to Sweden, with its long traditions of societal welfare and of producing doctorates, South Africa is now in a phase of significant expansion and construction of doctoral education – with the political aim to strengthen the economy and democracy of their nation (National Planning Commission, 2011). Due to these national differences, our project can contribute to a deeper understanding of both context-specific and global issues within the problem field.

  • 4.
    Bryder, Tom
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Silander, DanielVäxjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.Wallin, CharlotteVäxjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Svensk politik och den Europeiska unionen2004Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Evertsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, The University Library.
    Gunnarsson, Ted
    Linnaeus University, The University Library.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Skrivguiden.se - en resurs för studenters akademiska skrivande2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Studenters bristande förmåga att uttrycka sig i skrift har väckt uppmärksamhet i media.[1] Även forskningen har uppmärksammat de svårigheter många studenter upplever i samband med inträdet i en ny och okänd texttradition.[2] Skrivguiden.se är en webbaserad guide vars syfte är att ge stöd till studenter i deras akademiska skrivande. Innehållet behandlar skrivprocessen, problemformulering och hur man hanterar källor och referenser. Presentationen kommer att belysa Skrivguiden.se ur tre perspektiv: från idé till webbsida, som en resurs för studieverkstäder och som kurslitteratur.

    Skrivguiden.se utvecklades av Blekinge Tekniska Högskolas bibliotek och lanserades hösten 2013. I januari 2014 lanserades den engelskspråkiga versionen – Writingguide.se. Målet var att Skrivguiden.se skulle bestå av korta texter och tydliga exempel. Det skulle vara möjligt för studenten att navigera mellan olika avsnitt för att hitta det som var relevant för den aktuella uppgiften. Ambitionen var även att utnyttja webbens möjligheter och integrera rörliga medier, självtester och dylikt. Sedan 2014 utvecklas Skrivguiden.se gemensamt av Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Högskolan i Kristianstad, Linnéuniversitetet och Umeå Universitet.

    Många lärosäten i Sverige har inrättat språk- och studieverkstäder i olika former. Dessa verksamheter erbjuder i olika omfattning stöd och handledning i bland annat akademiskt skrivande. Studieverkstaden vid Linnéuniversitetet har länge sett ett behov av att, vid sidan om den befintliga verksamheten, ta fram ett mer utvecklat stöd på webben. Ett sådant stöd kan med hjälp av instruerande text- och bildmaterial leda studenten genom hela skrivprocessen eller fungera som en resurs för mer specifika aspekter av skrivandet (t.ex. referenshantering). Intentionen är att Skrivguiden.se ska kunna fungera som ett sådant stöd och bli ett väl integrerat verktyg i Studieverkstadens verksamhet.

    Skrivguiden.se har under våren 2014 använts i kursen Teknisk kommunikation vid BTH för förstaårsstudenter på ingenjörsutbildningen. Syftet med kursen är att öka studenternas färdigheter i akademiskt skrivande och på ett tidigt stadium träna förmågan att skriva inför framtida examensarbete. Skrivguiden.se har använts i kursen på två olika sätt. Dels har upplägget på föreläsningarna följt guidens upplägg, dels har Skrivguiden.se fungerat som kurslitteratur.

    Vi tar gärna emot synpunkter från lärare och andra som arbetar med studenters skrivande. Vilken typ av skrivstöd på webben finns det behov av? Hur kan Skrivguiden.se förbättras och utvecklas vidare?

    [1] Enefalk, Hanna, Andersson, Lars M., Aronsson, August, Englund, Viktor, Novaky, György, Svensson,Magnus, Thisner, Fredrik, Ågren, Henrik & Ågren, Maria (2013). Våra studenter kan inte svenska. Uppsala Nya Tidning, 2013-01-02. Tillgänglig: http://www.unt.se/debatt/vara-studenter-kan-inte-svenska-2027570.aspx [2014-05-14].

    [2] Ask, Sofia (2007). Vägar till ett akademiskt skriftspråk. Diss. Växjö : Växjö universitet, 2007.

     

  • 6. Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Commissioning the University of Excellence: Swedish research policy and new public research funding programmes2012In: Quality in Higher Education, ISSN 1353-8322, E-ISSN 1470-1081, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 367-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries, current research policy is dominated by managerialism and excellence, manifesting the aim of making universities into national strategic assets in the globally competitive knowledge economy. This article discusses these policy trends and their mirror in recent developments in public funding for academic research, with special attention to Sweden. A review of the language in three consecutive Swedish governmental research bills from the past 10 years shows a clear policy shift towards the promotion of excellence and strategic priority on the level of higher education institutions. Reforms to the funding system, especially the launch of specific strategic excellence funding programmes, are introduced to put the policy in practice. While the policy shift itself might be discursive, the changes to the funding system clearly show a determination on behalf of the Swedish government to increase strategic profiling and the pursuit of excellence in research on behalf of universities. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden; Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Silander, CharlotteLinnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.Silander, DanielLinnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Governance and political entrepreneurship in Europe: promoting growth and welfare in times of crisis2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping university, Sweden;Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Silander, CharlotteLinnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.Silander, DanielLinnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Political Entrepreneurship: Regional Growth and Entrepreneurial Diversity in Sweden2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political Entrepreneurship explores the role of political entrepreneurs in regional growth and entrepreneurial diversity. The authors define a political entrepreneur as a politician, bureaucrat or officer within the publicly funded sector who encourages entrepreneurship for growth and employment using innovative approaches. This book aims to enrich the established research on entrepreneurship with in-depth knowledge of the conditions conducive for political entrepreneurship in Sweden.

  • 9.
    Lindberg, Leif
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education. Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Riis, Ulla
    Silander, Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Akademins olika världar2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna rapport är att – med utgångspunkt i befintlig statistik om högre utbildning i Sverige – identifiera kritiska faser i övergången från grundutbildning till forskarutbildning, respektive från forskarutbildning till anställning vid högskolan, med avseende på kön och befattningar för vilka doktorsexamen krävs. Rapporten ska också pröva vad en fokusering på horisontella processer i den befi ntliga statistiken kan betyda för möjligheterna att kvalificera hypoteserna om den kvarstående bristande jämställdheten, i de avseenden som nämns ovan. För det tredje, att formulera inriktning för fortsatta studier på området.

    Undersökningen är explorativ och ska uppfattas som en förstudie vilken

    ringar in områden för fortsatta studier. Häri ingår även en tidigare publicerad rapport Jämställdhet inom universitet och högskolor – En bibliografi med kommentarer (Högskoleverkets rapportserie 2003:22R). Den här aktuella rapporten och den från 2003 är finansierade av Högskoleverkets jämställdhetsråd.

    Rapporten redovisar kortfattat jämställdhetssatsningar i högre utbildning

    under efterkrigstiden, de material som använts för analyserna, de benäm-

    ningar på områden och personal som använts samt förändringar i indelningen av SCB:s utbildningsstatistik för den högre utbildningen samt vilka jämförelser som kan göras över tid till följd av dessa förändringar.

    I rapporten fokuseras på förändringar av könsbalansen inom högskolan

    under 1990-talet med utgångspunkt från uppfattningen att utvecklingen mot ökad jämställdhet går för långsamt. Här beskrivs förändringar i kvinnoandelar för åren 1987, 1993 och 2002 och då kan på aggregerad nivå (vertikal) avläsas en stegvis ökning nerifrån och uppåt över tid mot uppnådd jämställdhet definierat av jämställdhetsintervallet. T.ex. kan då visas att kvinnoandelen av de doktorsexaminerade är 44% år 2002. I en horisontell analys framgår dock att dessa 44% byggs upp av ett antal asymmetriska förhållanden där fem forskningsområden ligger utanför jämställdhets intervallet. Två av områdena domineras av kvinnor samtidigt som antalet doktorsexamina inom dessa områden är litet. De tre områden som domineras av doktorsexamina av män utgör ca

    40 % av alla doktorsexamina som avlades under 2002.

    Analyser görs även av personalkategorier, verksamhetsområde och kön samt mellan doktorsexaminerade, verksamhetsområde, kön och forskarassistenter. Jämförelser görs också mellan doktorsexaminerade, kön och professorer.

    Författarna studerar också bl.a. förändringar i kvinnoandelarna inom

    forskarutbildningen samt övergången mellan grundutbildning och forskar-

    utbildning. I denna övergång, där utgångsläget är ungefär en tredjedel fler

    examinerade kvinnor än män i grundutbildningen, är den sammanlagda övergångsfrekvensen för kvinnor 4.8% och för män 10%. De kvinnodominerade ämnesområdena i grundutbildning, med undantag för medicin, har mycket låga övergångsfrekvenser.

    Studien innehåller också analyser med avseende på könsbalans och bristen på könsbalans i den svenska högskolan. Här framhålls att, inom det samlande begreppet den svenska högskolan, finns olika världar där var och en fungerar under olika villkor. Särskilt framträdande är det antalsmässiga förhållandet mellan professorstillgång och antalet grundutbildnings studenter. Området medicin, t.ex., kännetecknas av flest professorer, stor doktorsproduktion (varav ungefär hälften är kvinnor) och relativt få examinerade grundutbildningsstudenter. Samhällsvetenskap, som ett andra exempel, har många grundutbildningsstudenter, få examinerade doktorer och glest mellan professorerna. Områdena undervisning samt vård och omsorg är helt dominerade av kvinnor

    vad avser examinerade från grundutbildningen. Övergångsfrekvensen från

    grundutbildning till forskarutbildning är betydligt lägre om dessa jämförs

    med andra områden. Professorstillgången är mycket begränsad, liksom de

    akademiska karriärmöjligheterna.

    Det framhålls i studien att en huvudsaklig fokusering på den vertikala pro-

    cessen i beskrivningar och analyser av könsandelar blir ett problem, eftersom sådana beskrivningar och analyser kommer att betona förändringens lång- samhet. En fokusering på horisontella processer i analyserna kommer i stället att lyfta fram både områden där förändringar inträffar och sådana där ingenting händer. Olikheterna i skilda utbildnings- och ämnesområdens materiella villkor blir i studier av horisontella processer iakttagbara inte minst vad avser karriärmöjligheter för kvinnor och män. Balansen mellan, å ena sidan kvinnor och män, å andra sidan tillgången till forskarutbildning och anställning är inte densamma mellan utbildnings/ämnesområden.

    I rapporten diskuteras utgångspunkter för ett forskningsprogram och for-

    muleras en referensram för fortsatta undersökningar. I denna framhålls, å

    ena sidan, förhållandet att försöken att förklara det låga antalet kvinnor inom akademin i olika grad tar fasta på diskriminering eller självselektion. Å andra sidan fi nns en diskussion om huruvida akademin egentligen skiljer sig från övriga samhället. Vissa menar att det inte är så, medan andra hävdar att det finns förhållanden som talar för att akademin är speciell jämförd med andra sektorer, med månghundraårig manlig dominans och ett mer än hundraårigt strikt meritokratiskt system som måste genomgås för att en position ska kunna erhållas. Dessa ståndpunkter får utgöra grunden för en indelning av försöken

    att förklara underrepresentationen av kvinnor, och särskilt på högre nivåer, inom den svenska högskolan. Fyra kategorier erhålls härigenom:

    (1) Inomakademiska självselektionsförklaringar

    (2) Inomakademiska diskrimineringsförklaringar

    (3) Utomakademiska självselektionsförklaringar

    (4) Utomakademiska diskrimineringsförklaringar.

    Det konstateras att merparten av hittills gjorda undersökningar kan kategoriseras under (1) och framförallt under (2), i viss mån under (3), medan studier under (4) knappast förkommer alls. Studier i anslutning till (3) fokuserar oftast dessutom på vilken roll familjeförhållanden spelar för kvinnors akademiska karriär. Rapporten innehåller slutligen ett antal undersökningsskisser.

  • 10.
    Lindberg, Leif
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Riis, Ulla
    Uppsala universitet.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Gender Equality and the Academy:When Desire and Choice Face Hindrance, Opportunities and Resistance2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lindberg, Leif
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Riis, Ulla
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Gender Equality in Swedish Higher Education: Patterns and Shifts2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 165-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most European countries, more women than men attend undergraduate Higher Education (HE) and more women than men obtain degrees. In Sweden the proportion of female students has long been in the vicinity of 51-60%. The number of doctoral entrants and degrees meet a obalanced gender criterion,o defined as no sex constituting more than 60% of the population. Still the unequal gender structure of higher positions persists: men tend to hold the top positions, especially as professors. Explaining this inertia is the main theme of this article. Differences between horizontal and vertical analyses are focused on, and changes due to gender balance during 1999-2007 are shown. Variations in career patterns over research areas are highlighted. Finally, hypotheses are formulated and approaches for further studies on gender balance in HE are discussed.

  • 12.
    Lindberg, Leif
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Riis, Ulla
    Silander, Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Gender Inequality in Swedish Higher Education2005In: Fourth European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Riis, Ulla
    et al.
    Pedagogiska institutionen Uppsala universitet.
    Haake, Ulrika
    Pedagogiska institutionen Umeå universitet.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Gender Equality and the Academy: When Desires and Choice Face Hinderance, Opportunities and Resistance: A Position Paper2008In: ECER 2008, From Teaching to Learning?, Sweden: University of Gothenburg , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Content and practice of Academic work: A gender perspective on the academic career2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on gender equality in Higher Education indicates that women do not leave academia to a greater extent than men, but their academic career tend to be slower. This paper examines how the content and practice of academic work may differ between men and women in different disciplines. How do men and women spend time on teaching research, administration and scientific tasks? Are there differences concerning leadership assignments and scientific mission between gender and discipline? The study is based on data from a larger study of two faculties at a large Swedish university. The results show large differences between men and women concerning activity in scientific missions meanwhile differences concerning leadership assignments. In both faculties, women on teaching positions have a higher proportion of research in their employment than men, but the gender gap is small. The conclusion is that the vertical mobility can be analyzed in terms of scientific production. Future research should specially focus on the gender dimensions of the context in the academic scientific production.

  • 15.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Exit från akademin? Män och kvinnors karriärer efter disputation2012In: Kvalitet och kollegialitet: Vänbok till Leif Lindberg / [ed] Martin Stigmar och Thomas Sandstedt, Växjö: Institutionen för pedagogik, psykologi och idrottsvetenskaper , 2012, p. 73-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Gender Equality in the European Union2019In: Political Entrepreneurship in Europe 2020: Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive growth in Europe / [ed] Karlsson, Charlie, Silander, Daniel, Pircher Brigitte, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Högskolesystemet och könsbalansen - en studie om jämställdhet i den svenska högskolan2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Kvantitativ kartläggning av könsbalans vid utbildningsvetenskapliga och naturvetenskapliga fakulteten vid Göteborgs universitet2012In: Jämställda fakulteter?: En studie av arbetsfördelning och normer hos lärare och forskare vid två fakulteter vid Göteborgs universitet / [ed] Charlotte Silander, Anna Peixoto, Anna-Karin Wyndham , Samuel Heiman, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet , 2012, p. 16-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Proceedings of Lärarlärdom: Conference on higher education, Växjö, 19 augusti, 20152015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Pyramider och pipelines: Om högskolesystemets påverkan på jämställdhet i högskolan2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on gender equality in Swedish higher education shows an unequal gender balance. Women are consistently underrepresented at the highest levels of the academic hierarchy. The lack of gender equality in academia has been illustrated by metaphors such as a narrowing pyramid, a leaky pipeline and a black hole. Unlike other problems in the academic context, gender inequality in higher education is seldom considered from a system perspective. The system of higher education has undergone major changes during the 1990s in terms of scope (more students, more faculty, more institutions, etc.), differentiation (inclusion of new disciplines) and geographical distribution (establishing institutions in previously unserviced areas). In this thesis, theoretical expectations concerning the effect of these changes on gender equality are developed.

    The thesis investigates gender equality in higher education by developing an analytical framework to analyze the system level and its impact on gender equality. The empirical data consists of two sets. The first set contains cross-sectional data on registered students, doctoral entrants, doctors, post-doctoral fellows, lecturers and professors in Swedish higher education. The second set is derived from the longitudinal integration database for health insurance and labor market studies (LISA), which consists of anonymized data on all individuals in the Swedish labor market that hold doctoral degrees.

    The main finding of the thesis is that the system of higher education does have an impact on the gender equality in higher education. The vertical gender balance has increased during the expansion of Swedish higher education during the 1990s. The horizontal gender balance has also increased, but the increase is limited to the student category. On the other hand, the system of higher education has not had an impact on the gender equality measured in terms of exits from academia. Instead, the analysis shows that the rate of men that leave academia is higher than the rate of women, and that commonly used metaphors portraying academia as a narrowing pyramid, a leaky pipeline or a black hole serve poorly as illustrations of the gender equality in academia.

  • 21.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Utbildningspolitik: Europeisering från Bologna till Lissabon2016In: Svensk politik och EU: Hur svensk politik har förändrats av medlemskapet i EU / [ed] Daniel Silander och Mats Öhlén, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2016, p. 123-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Berggren, Caroline
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A career asself-employed?  Entrepreneurshipeducation for women ? Transitions, career learning and career managementskills2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Berggren, Caroline
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Political Entrepreneurs and Women´s Entrepreneurship2016In: Political Entrepreneurship for Regional Growth and Entrepreneurial Diversity: the case of Sweden / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Charlotte Silander & Daniel Silander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 101-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Berggren, Caroline
    University of Gothenburg.
    Politiska entreprenörer och kvinnors företagande2015In: Politiskt entreprenörskap: Den offentliga sektorns sätt att skapa bättre förutsättningar för entreprenörskap lokalt, regionalt och nationellt / [ed] Daniel Silander & Charlotte Silander, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2015, 1, p. 71-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Berggren, Caroline
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The social efficiency of entrepreneurship education2018In: Governance and political entrepreneurship in Europe: promoting growth and welfare in times of crisis / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Charlotte Silander & Daniel Silander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, p. 154-179Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, EU policy towards entrepreneurship education is analysed from an ideological perspective. The authors discuss how EU policies have influenced the direction of higher education. Increasing expectations on higher education graduates to contribute to welfare and economic growth through self-employment have pushed the development of entrepreneurship education at European universities. They show how the EU is striving to introduce entrepreneurship education into the education system through policies to improve entrepreneurial performance, both vertically and horizontally. The authors also show how the social efficiency perspective dominates, under which the overall purpose of higher education is to efficiently and scientifically contribute to economic growth and fight unemployment. This represents an instrumentalist view on education that focuses on the individual entrepreneur as a hero figure and in which entrepreneurship education is often expected to present role models to students and teach them the proper behaviour to become successful.

  • 26.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Berggren, Caroline
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Social Efficiency ofEntrepreneurship Education2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Bergren, Caroline
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurship in Higher Education2017In: Uddevalla Symposium2017: Special Session: Governance and Political Entrepreneurship in Europe´s Economic Crisis, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Evidences learning online2014In: NGL 2014, Next Generation Learning Conference, Falun, Dalarna University, March 19-20, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we identify and classify research on online education in relation to learning by conducting an overview of existing research in the area of online learning presented in academic articles in ISI listed journals.

  • 29.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Haake, Ulrika
    Umeå university, Sweden.
    Gold-diggers, supporters and inclusive profilers: Strategies for profiling research in Swedish higher education2017In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, E-ISSN 1470-174X, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 2009-2025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Widespread reforms of governance and funding of universities has taken place in most Western countries, many of them influenced by New Public Management (NPM), which includes intensified attempts by the government to steer academic research in a utility direction. One way to do this is through university profiles and priorities of research. This article aims to describe how the changing system of assessing and funding research impact Swedish higher-education institutions (HEIs) regarding the universities’ internal organisation of research and research priorities. A study of seven Swedish universities and university colleges shows that governmental prompting on concentration of research resources in some ways has been followed by all HEIs. Strategies for profiling research are found to be done in different ways; including digging after ‘gold’, as supporting priorities from bottom-up or profiling only by words. Ambitions to profile research are strongest among the central university management and vice chancellors. In the lower layers of HEIs, academic norms prove resistant to quick changes.

  • 30.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Haake, Ulrika
    Umeå university, Sweden.
    The re-modeling of Higher Education – the introduction of performance based research funding at new universities and university colleges in Sweden2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Haake, Ulrika
    Umeå University.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Intern organisation och styrning av forskningens profilering och finansiering: En studie av svenska högskolor och nya universitet. Slutrapport till KK-stiftelsen 2014-03-142014Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Haake, Ulrika
    Umeå universitet.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    The different worlds of academia: a horizontal analysis of gender equality in Swedish higher education2013In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 173-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women are underrepresented in advanced positions in higher education in Europe. This study takes a horizontal perspective and focuses on the relationship between gender and discipline in order to combine research on gender in higher education with theories of disciplinary differences in academic cultures. The study points out substantial differences between disciplines in gender composition, specifically, the probability of a person leaving academia after earning a doctor’s degree and various attitudes towards gender equality work. Our approach, which is based on quantitative longitudinal as well as qualitative research methods, has yielded a more complex and contradictory picture of gender equality in higher education than have vertical cross-sectional studies.

  • 33.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Henriksson, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Bilder av kvinnors företagande i Kronobergs län: Möjligheter och hinder2013Report (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Reizel, Liza
    Institute for Social Research, Norway.
    Pietiälä, Maria
    Helsinki University, Finland.
    Drange, Ida
    Institute for Social Research, Norway.
    National Frameworks for Gender Equality in Nordic Higher Education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Riis, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Nordic research on gendered academic careers – a literature review2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Riis, Ulla
    Pedagogiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Haake, Ulrika
    Pedagogiska institutionen, Umeå universitet.
    Gender Equality and the Academy: Facts or False Assuptions?2009In: ECER 2009, Vienna September 28-30: Theory and Evidence in European Educational Research, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Silander, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Politiska entreprenörer: avslutande reflektioner2015In: Politiskt entreprenörskap: Den offentliga sektorns sätt att skapa bättre förutsättningar för entreprenörskap lokalt, regional och nationellt / [ed] Daniel Silander & Charlotte Silander, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2015, p. 153-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Stigmar, Martin
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Individual Growth or Institutional Development? Ideological perspectives on motives behind Swedish Higher Education Teacher Training2019In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 265-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the motives for offering or engaging in higher education teacher trainingcourses? This question is of interest for educational developers, teachers, university managers,and policy makers in order to design courses and to meet stakeholders’expectations. Previousresearch has mainly focused on the impact of higher education development courses on teacherpractice and student learning. Few studies have investigated the motives behind these courses.In this paper, the motives are investigated among students, teachers, university management,and the government. The study is based on national and local documents on educationaldevelopment and on interviews with representatives from four Swedish universities. Theresults show that all stakeholder groups are in favour of compulsory courses but the motivesdiffer. Students, management, and government embrace an institutional perspective on educa-tional development, in line with a social efficiency perspective on the purposes of highereducation emphasising usefulness, function, and the production of skills. University teachers,on the other hand, have a more individual-oriented view on educational development and aremore oriented towards a learning-centred perspective.

  • 39.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Stigmar, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Motiv, mål och upplevda resultat avseende svensk högskolepedagogisk utbildning: [Motives, Goals and Perceived Outcomes of Higher Education Teacher Training Courses in Sweden]2016In: NU 2016, Malmö, 15-17 juni, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an analysis of the motives, goals and perceived result of Higher Education Teacher Training courses (HETT) at Swedish universities. A growing demand on improved quality of teaching and learning in Swedish higher education have led to an increased number of Educational Development Units at universities as well as to a higher turn-out of teachers taking part in HETT. In addition, this has come with substantial investments in launching and organizing university units for educational development. Despite the demand on improved quality of teaching and learning in Swedish higher education, there is only limited research on the result of HETT courses. Existing training courses seem to embed a diverse set of goals, different expectations from course instructors and participants and in terms of result more research on HETT is needed. 

    This study sets out to focus on perceived result of former course participants in HETT courses. Four groups of stakeholders are in focus: 1) students, 2) university teachers, 3) the university management and 4) the government. The overall question to be explored is: What different expectations do these stakeholders have on HETT regarding course motives and goals and what perceived result do they see. While motives and goals are mainly analyzed in existing documents, perceived outcomes are collected through interviews.

     

    .

  • 40.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Stigmar, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Motives, Goals and Perceived Outcome of Higher Education Teacher Training Courses in Sweden2016In: International Consortium of Educational Development (ICED), 2016 Conference, Ethics, Care and Quality in Educational Development, Cape Town, 22-25 November, 2016., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the motives for engaging in Higher education development courses? This question is of interest for educational developers, teachers, university managers and policy makers in order to design courses and to meet stakeholder´s expectations. Previous research has mainly focused the impact of higher education development courses on teacher practice and student learning. Few studies has investigated the motives behind these courses or addressed how the result is used by higher education institutions. In this paper the motives and perceived result is investigated among students, teachers, university management and the government. Preliminary result indicate a variety of motives among stakeholders.

  • 41.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Stigmar, Martin
    Malmö university.
    Negotiating a crowded curriculum: a stakeholder perspective on the content of higher education development courses2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our presentation and seminar aims at contributing to theunderstanding of different stakeholders' views and expectationson the content of higher education teacher training (HETT).University teachers are typically carefully trained in doingresearch, however, frequently they lack formal pedagogicaltraining (Gosling, 2009; Holt, Palmer, & Challis, 2011; SwedishNational Union of Students (SFS), 2015). One way to addressthe lack of pedagogical experience is to arrange teachertraining courses. As the quality of higher education becomesthe focus of attention in the Western world and the demandon teaching and learning increase, so does the requirement ofuniversity teachers to take part in teacher training (Gibbs, 2013;Havnes & Stensaker, 2006). As universities can be describedas "loosely coupled systems" (Weick, 1976) where differentparts are expected to have diverging goals and course planningrequire the accommodation of many different perspective,several actors are likely to have different opinions about thecontent of higher education development courses. Accordingly,our research seeks to investigate how different stakeholdersview and value the content of HETT. This research field remainsunder-explored and insufficiently problematized.The aim of our seminar is to problematize and discuss fourstakeholders' views of course content in higher educationteacher training in Sweden, namely: 1) students, 2) universityteachers, 3) university management and 4) government. Wewill present patterns, similarities and differences, concerningcourse content in HETT, among the four different stakeholders.Methodologically, our investigation is based on interviewsand document analysis to explore different viewpoints on thecontent in HETT among students, university teachers, centraluniversity managers in four Swedish new universities and the government. Theoretically the analysis will be guided by Ellström's (2006) and Dreyfus' (1986) approaches to the relationbetween theory and practice.Preliminary results indicate diverging views between differentstakeholder groups where teachers and university management, expect HETT to be primarily practically oriented andrelate to constructive alignment (Biggs, 2005). However, inthe national recommendations on outcomes for HETT, theemphasis is on theoretical rather than practical applicability(SUHF, 2017).In the seminar, we wish to discuss the following suggestionsfor HETT:– Introduce and emphasize practical recommendations aslearning outcomes for teaching qualifications required foremployment as academic teacher,– Include concrete practical teachings tips in physical anddigital learning environments,– Present and problematize the concept of constructivealignment including course improvements and teachingquality regarding: learning outcomes, concrete teachingmethods and a variation of examination forms,– Compile HETT-evaluations not only on a regular and localuniversity basis, but also nationally and clarify how progressand improved quality is promoted in HETT-courses based onprevious local and national evaluations,– Encourage and enable for teams of teachers to participatein the same HETT,– Closely link the HETT content to the documentation ofquality work at the university.

  • 42.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Virtanen, Turo
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Pietilä, Maria
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Priority-setting in Research Management: Organisational and Leadership Reactions to Institutional Reforms in Finnish and Swedish Universities2013Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Den politiska entreprenören: en introduktion2015In: Politiskt entreprenörskap: Den offentliga sektorns sätt att skapa bättre förutsättningar för entreprenörskap lokalt, regional och nationellt / [ed] Daniel Silander & Charlotte Silander, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2015, p. 7-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Förändrad transatlantisk relation med Barack Obamas ledarskap2009In: EPOK Utrikespolitiska institutetArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Introduction: the political entrepreneur for regional growth and entrepreneurisal diversity2016In: Political Entrepreneurship for Regional Growth and Entrepreneurial Diversity : the case of Sweden / [ed] Karlsson, Charlie; Silander, Charlotte; Silander, Daniel, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 3-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Political entrepreneurship: final remarks2016In: Political Entrepreneurship for Regional Growth and Entrepreneurial Diversity: the case of Sweden. / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Charlotte Silander & Daniel Silander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 189-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, CharlotteLinnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Politiskt entreprenörskap: Den offentliga sektorns sätt att skapa bättre förutsättningar för entreprenörskap lokalt, regionalt och nationellt2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    State of the Union for a Prosperous Europe2018In: Governance and political entrepreneurship in Europe: promoting growth and welfare in times of crisis / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Charlotte Silander, Daniel Silander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, p. 271-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    The European Commission: the EU as agenda-setter for economic growth and entrepreneurship2018In: Governance and Political Entrepreneurship in Europe: Promoting Growth and Welfare in Times of Crisis / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Charlotte Silander, Daniel Silander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, p. 57-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Silander, Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Bryder, Tom
    Swedish Identity and the Transformation of Europe2002Report (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 58
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