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  • 1.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bolivia under the Left Presidency of Evo Morales: Indigenous People and the end of Postcolonialism?2013In: International Studies - Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal, ISSN 1641-4233, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 35-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the development in Bolivia under president Evo Morales, through a critical postcolonial approach.  From a traditional liberal perspective, this article concludes that the liberal democratic system under Morales has not been deepening, though certain new participatory aspects of democracy, including socio-economic reforms have been carried out. In contrast, this article analyses to what extent the presidency of Evo Morales may be seen as the end of the postcolonialism, and the beginning of a new era in which Bolivia’s indigenous people finally have been incorporated into the forward development of a multi-ethnic society. By analysing issues such as time, nation, land, space, globalization and language, the conclusion is that the new constitution marks a fresh beginning, one beyond the colonial and postcolonial eras, for indigenous groups, but it will not bring back the old indigenous societies as was dominating the territory of today’s modern state.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Brasilien2015In: Komparativ politik: Nio politiska system / [ed] Carsten Anckar & Thomas Denk, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 167-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Brasilien2018In: Komparativ politik: tio politiska system / [ed] Thomas Denk, Carsten Anckar, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 2 uppl., p. 169-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Civila samhället2012In: Motståndskraft, oberoende, integritet - Kan det svenska samhället stå emot korruption: National Integrity System Assessment Sweden 2011 / [ed] Staffan Andersson, Stockhom: Transperancy International Sweden , 2012, 1, p. 421-437Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Climate and environmental politics: resource efficient2019In: Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive Growth: Political Entrepreneurship for a Prosperous Europe / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Daniel Silander & Brigitte Pircher, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 225-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Demokratins återkomst till Latinamerika2000Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Demokratisering i Latinamerika under 1900-talet: – vänstern och demokratins fördjupning2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the issue of democratization in Latin America during the 20th century, and in particular the role of the left in this process. The purpose of this study is to empirically analyze the role of the left as a political actor in the process of democratization toward the deepening of the democratic rule in Latin America. The research questions are: what role did the left have in the transitions to electoral democracies during the 20th century in Latin America? Why did the left have the role it had in the transitions? How does the left’s view of democracy affect the transition to electoral democracy, and the further democratization to deepen democratic rule? What structural constraints affect the left’s ability to deepen democratic rule?

    A comparative qualitative method and different theoretical concepts of democracy, democratization, elite perspective, mobilization and organizations have been used, and examples from different Latin American cases are given. One empirical conclusion is that the role of the left in the transitions to electoral democracies varies from participation with active left leaders, collective left actions, to not have any significant role at all. A second empirical conclusion is that in cases where left wing governments have tried to enforce a model of participatory democracy, the result has been “ coup d’état” or rebellions conducted by military forces and supported by the economic elite and the United States of America. In other cases when left parties in government instead have remained within the framework of an elite democracy, the result has rather been stabilization of the liberal democratic rule.

    The main theoretical conclusions are as follows: the theoretical discussion about democratic consolidation and the deepening of democracy have to consider that different actors’ (in this study the left) preferences for various models of democracy differ; the actors’ view of democracy matter in the game of democratic development and democratic consolidation; and the relations between the elite actors’ preferences for different models of democracy determine the outcome of a specific form of democratic model (in this study electoral democracy, liberal democracy or participatory democracy).

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Den politiska opinionen om Turkiets EU-medlemsskap2010In: Avstamp: Svenska folkets värden och syn på brännande samhällsfrågor / [ed] Magnus Hagevi, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press , 2010, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    European Union (EU)2017In: International Organizations and The Rise of ISIL: Global Responses to Human Security Threats / [ed] Daniel Silander, Don Wallace and John Janzekovic, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, p. 72-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Från industrisamhälle till globalt informationssamhälle2001In: Politik i Globaliseringens tid / [ed] Christer Jönsson, Magnus Jerneck, Lars-Göran Stenelo, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2001, 1, p. 178-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Globalization and the Formation of the Political Left in Latin America2012In: Latin American Responses to Globalization in the 21st Century / [ed] Manuela Nilsson and Jan Anderson, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 1, p. 76-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Globalization and the Left in Latin America2008In: Conference on Latin America and Globalization - Views from the Americas and Europe: Globalization’s Impact on Latin America, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Grannskapspolitiken: Från svensk politik i Östersjön till EU:s östliga partnerskap2016In: Svensk politik och EU: Hur svensk politik har förändrats av medlemskapet i EU / [ed] Daniel Silander och Mats Öhlén, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2016, p. 237-254Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Statsvetenskap.
    International Donor Institutions and Promotion of Democracy, Macro-Economic Policies and Poverty Reduction - a Contradiction?2007In: European Consortium for Political Research, Joint Sessions of Workshops at Helsinki – 7-12 May 2007: Workshop 25: Inequality, Poverty and Democratic Governance in Developing Countries, ECPR , 2007, p. 25-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Left Democratic Presidencies in Latin America: New Challenges to U.S. Foreign Policy?2009In: Latin American and Caribbean Politics, Panel 8-9: U.S. Foreign Policy toward Latin America., 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)2015In: International Organizations and the Implementation of the Responsibility to Protect: The Humanitarian Crisis in Syria / [ed] Daniel Silander, Don Wallace, Oxon: Routledge, 2015, p. 174-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)2017In: International Organizations and The Rise of ISIL: Global Responses to Human Security Threats / [ed] Daniel Silander, Don Wallace and John Janzekovic, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, p. 169-180Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Enlargement of the European Union - the Democratic Perspective behind the Copenhagen Criteria2001In: Political Change in the European Union / [ed] Ryszard Machnikowski et al,, Lodz, Poland: University of Lodz , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The European Union and global climate change2018In: Climate Change, Policy and Security: State and Human Security / [ed] Donald Wallace and Daniel Silander, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 131-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Latin American Left in the 2000s: Why two Paths?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Latin American Left in the 2000s:Have We Seen This Before? (Open Access)2011In: Asian Journal of Latin American Studies, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 91-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though the left wave in the 2000s appears to be a new phenomenon inLatin America, there are parallels with the past. First, it is still accurate todivide it between one more radical and one social-democratic left. Second, itis furthermore still divided into two paths, which were somewhat establishedunder different circumstances and reasons in Central America, the Andesand in the Southern Cone. Third, the division between the moderate andradical left has clearly been witnessed before. In previous (Costa Rica 1949-,Venezuela 1958-) as well as contemporary cases (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay)social-democratic parties have always promoted liberal democracy and theeconomic order of today, but have never challenged the elite actors' positionin society or the democratic stability. In addition, the contemporary radicalcases (Venezuela, Bolivia and Ecuador) have similarities to old cases(Guatemala 1944-1954, Chile 1970-1973) in the attempt to challenge liberaldemocracy and accomplishing drastic socio-economic reforms, but while theold cases ended in military coups the radical left is still in power in thecontemporary cases. Ultimately, the left in government is not a newphenomenon, and today it has two paths, but the scope of its influences, inthe radical cases, will probably have deeper consequences for society anddemocracy than ever.

  • 22.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Left and Democratic Consolidation - Deepening Democracy in Latin America2009In: The Democratization Project: Challenges and Opportunities / [ed] Ashok Swain, London: Anthem Press, 2009, 1, p. 87-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Statsvetenskap.
    The Left in Government – Deepening or Constraining Democracy in Latin America?2007In: 2007 Annual Conference of the Swedish Network of Peace, Conflict and Development Research, October 23-24, 2007 Uppsala – Sweden: Theme: The Democratization Project: Challenges and Opportunities, 2007, p. 22-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 1990s, after the transition from dictatorship to electoral democracy in Latin America, the left began to win elections, or became the major challenger against right-wing governments—setting off a massive and relatively long-term wave of democratically-elected left leaders. This article, in focusing on the left of this political continuum, aims to explore the nature of democracy in the context of its resur-gence in Latin America, specifically attempting to understand whether and how the new left as a political actor can move beyond an electoral democracy, toward a deepening of democratic institutions. After dis-cussing the societal and political transformations that led to the left’s resurgence in Latin America, the article moves into an elaboration of its conceptualization of the left, addressing both the radical participa-tory and the social democratic left in relation to their fundamental views on democracy and the economy. Subsequently, the article turns toward a historical discussion of past leftist governments—both radical and more social-democratic cases—which in turn points to structural constraints that, at least historically, have hindered the accomplishment of radical participatory democracy in Latin America. The question that this article conclusively attempts to address is what implications this might have for democratic stability, when Latin America is once more facing the reality of democratically-elected, but radical left leaders.

    One conclusion is that the new tendencies of the left in Latin America can be said to have followed two distinct paths in the democratic consolidation era. One is the reformist, social-democratic left, which sup-ports the development of liberal democracy and neoliberal economy therewith complies with the political, social, and economic order of the day. In contrast, the radical left would like to develop a participatory democracy with socio-economic reforms that may potentially challenge societies’ major actors. Like simi-lar cases before them, the development of democracy in today’s Latin America is inevitably influenced by these paths, and is simultaneously constrained and deepened. Another conclusion is that democracy is deepended in both these routes. It is deepened in a liberal democracy, because it means more civil and political right for the people and a more well-functioning democracy, in relation too just free and fair elec-tions as in an elite democratic system, in which the competion to win elections is the main thing. It is deepened in a participatory democracy, because it means more possibility for people to actively participate in political decions-making on a local grassroots-level and on issues related to daily-life socio-economic issues. But it is also constrained because radical left reforms is challenging the elite actors - radical left governments might eventually bring about a downfall of democracy. Furthermore, it is constrained through the reformist, social democratic platform, because social reforms that the people may want are not instilled because they do not comply with the elite’s interests (as in the case of Chile in the 1990s). In this case, it means to maintain elite democracy and neoliberal policies democracy, without challenging the interest of the elite.

    A final conclusion is that changes in democratic models within transitioning countries potentially necessi-tate support from the dominant elite actors. Radical political and economic changes that took place in historical Chile and Guatemala were challenged by the same kind of actors as in today’s Venezuela, Bo-livia, Ecuador and Nicaragua—namely, the economic elite, the military, external (mainly U.S.) forces and the parliamentary right. With the historical record countries such as Chile and Guatemala, the main ques-tion might not be if radical cases such as Venezuela, Bolivia and Ecuador will meet the same destiny; rather it could just to be a matter of time when it will happen in, at least, one of these cases.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Left in Government - State, Civil Society and Deepening Democracy in Latin America2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Left in Government: Deepening or Constraining Democracy in Latin America?2008In: Latin American Democracy: Emerging Reality or Endangered Species? / [ed] Richard L. Millett, Jennifer S. Holmes, and Orlando Perez., Routledge, USA , 2008, p. 265-283Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Radical Left in Goverment: Deepening and Constraining Democracy in Venezuela and Bolivia2013In: Revista Andina de Estudios Políticos, ISSN 2221-4135, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 70-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the radical left in Latin America, particular in Venezuela and Bolivia, and discusses to what extent the achieved political and socio-economic policies have contributed to deepening democracy, either related to the concept of liberal democracy or participatory democracy. It is argued that democracy both has been weakening and deepening. On the one hand, democracy has been weakening, to some extent, if we measure democracy as equivalent to liberal democratic institutions such as elections, political freedoms and accountability, particular in the case of Venezuela. However, on the other hand, it can be argued that new participatory dimensions have increased, resulting in deepening of democracy, for example as in Bolivia. Still, all radical left administrations are facing several obstacles to overcome in order to deepen democracy, both when it comes to develop democratic institutions in accordance with the liberal as well as the participatory traditions.

  • 27.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    The Radical Left in Goverment: Deepening and Constraining Democracy in Venezuela and Bolivia. 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    U.S. Foreign Policy and Democratization in Latin America - Hostility against Democratic Left Governments?2008In: Virginia Political Science Association Conference of Political Scientist, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA, USA , 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore the overall role of the U.S. Foreign Policy’s consequences for demo-cratization in Latin America, in an era when Latin America has democratically elected left presi-dencies, and when new-born democracies (in most cases at least) are supposed to become con-solidated. After a historical overview of the U.S. foreign policy towards Latin America during the 20th century; showing that doubts consistently could be raised on the issue of U.S. democratic assistance and Latin America; the paper moves into three main parts. In the first part cases when the United States promoted democratic development and liberal democracy with capital-ism is explored. In the second, cases when the United States defeated democratic left-wing rule with strong anti-capitalism measurements is explored. Finally, the third part deals with the question that this paper conclusively attempts to address - what implications the U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America might have for democratic development and democratic setbacks when the region once more is facing the reality of democratically elected left presidents?

  • 29.
    Nilsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bromander, Tobias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Political Entrepreneurs, Higher Education and Young Entrepreneurship2016In: Political Entrepreneurship: Regional Growth and Entrepreneurial Diversity in Sweden / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Charlotte Silander and Daniel Silander, Cheltenham Glos, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 171-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Nilsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bromander, Tobias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Politiska entreprenörer inom högre utbildning2015In: Politiskt entreprenörskap: Den offentliga sektorns sätt att skapa bättre förutsättningar för entreprenörskap lokalt, regionalt och nationellt / [ed] Daniel Silander & Charlotte Silander, Santérus Förlag, 2015, p. 113-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Nilsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Democracy and Security in the EU:s Eastern Neighborhood?: Assessing the ENP in Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine2016In: Democracy and Security, ISSN 1741-9166, E-ISSN 1555-5860, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 44-61, article id 1135744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the European Union’s (EU) democratic and security objectives in the European Neighborhood Policy (ENP) toward three post-Soviet states: Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine. By discussing the ENP’s objectives, this study concludes the following: first, despite long-term ENP democracy promotion, there have been very limited democratic developments in the partner states between 2005 and 2014; second, security challenges remain in partner states in the breakaway regions in Transnistria in Moldova, Abkhazia and South Ossetia in Georgia, and Crimea, Donetsk, and Luhansk in Ukraine. Therefore, EU’s Kantian view of security through democracy has failed, and its ambition to create a ring of Eastern friends has not led to improved relations in the Eastern neighborhood. On the contrary, the EU’s push eastward has instead intensified insecurity in its partner states due to limited democratization.

  • 32.
    Nilsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Silander, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Demokratins förutsättningar i Ukraina: EU, Ryssland och den nationella politiska elitens roll2015In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 191-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a theoretical perspective linking international actors with domestic elites, this article explores how Ukraine’s process of democratization in the 2000s should be understood in terms of international pressure from the European Union (EU) and Russia squeezing the domestic elites into two alternative roadmaps for Ukraine. Ukraine, as a “swing-state” of democratic progress and problems, is assumed to have great impact on the regional democratic landscape. The contemporary hybrid nature of Ukraine’s political regime is a consequence of Ukraine being located geopolitically between the authoritarian Russia and the democratic member states of the EU, leading to competing political elites with alternative visions for the future of Ukraine.

  • 33.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    A Wider Europe: Does the European Neighborhood Policy Work?2014In: International Relations and Diplomacy, ISSN 2328-2134, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 336-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the European normative power of the European Neighborhood Policy (ENP). By analyzing EU democracy promotion for Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine, the author assesses EU normative capacity. Based on the analysis of EU democracy promotion and institutional impact in the six targeted states, the author argues that the EU has been a weak normative power in the region. Instead of building a “ring of friends” as argued by the EU Commission, in an enlarged democratic community, the EU has achieved poor democratic records in all six states, with Azerbaijan as the worst case and Georgia as the best. The result may call into question the idea of the EU as normative power and democracy promoter in European politics.

  • 34.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    A Wider Europe: Does the European NeighborhoodPolicy Work?2014In: International Academic Conference on Law andPolitics (IACLP), April 25th-26th, Istanbul, Turkey., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Be Like US, But Not One of Us: Exploring the EU Normative Power in Neighboring States2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    China and Global Climate Change2018In: Global Climate Change, Policy and Security: State and Human Impacts / [ed] Donald Wallace and Daniel Silander, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 150-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Democratization Without Enlargement? : The European Neighbourhood Policy on Post-communist Transitions2013In: Contemporary Politics, ISSN 1356-9775, E-ISSN 1469-3631, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 441-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the concept of normative power in Europe by assessing the democratic impact of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) in Eastern Europe. By focusing on democratization as a normative objective of the ENP, the authors argued that the European Union (EU) should not be assumed to be a normative power in international politics. It is argued that the EU vision of creating a ring of friends through the ENP has failed. Although the number of EU member states has significantly increased, and the Western European norms and values have become consolidated in most of Europe, Europe remains divided between EU member states and the others. The democratic decline in Russia, the conflict in Georgia in 2008, and the growing authoritarianism in Belarus and Ukraine have had negative effects on the notion of a whole, free, and democratized Europe.

  • 38.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Democratization Without Enlargement EU and Postcommunist Transitions2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Europe without Dividing Lines?: Democratization in the New Eastern Europe and the International Context2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    On Democracy Promotion: The Impact of the Arab Uprisings on Democratization?2015In: Global Challenges to the Transatlantic World / [ed] Cristina Crespo, Daniel Silander, Donald Wallace, Isabel Albella, Alcala, Spain: Instituto Franklin de Estudios Norteamericanos , 2015, p. 63-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Protecting and Promoting Europe: The ENP and the Security-Democracy Nexus in Partner States?2014In: Journal of Applied Security Research, ISSN 1936-1610, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 460-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the early 2000s, the European Union (EU) enlarged eastwardinto postcommunist territory. This was a successful foreign policystrategy to protect and promote European norms and values.In 2004, the EU decided on a new European Neighborhood Policy(ENP) toward neighboring states. The ENP aimed to create aring of friends. This article assesses the ENP on democratization ineastern and southern partner states, 16 partner states altogether,in 2004–2014. It is argued that, despite the ENP effort to protectEurope by promoting democratic norms and values, the EU’s bordersare under heavy pressure from authoritarianism and politicalinstability.

  • 42.
    Silander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sustaining global democracy?: Exploring patterns of democratization in strategic swing states2014In: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, International Science Index, Economics and Management Engineering,, 2014, Vol. 1, p. 509-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How may the international community sustain global democracy? This paper explores the patterns of democratization in strategic swing states around the world. Based on Larry Diamond’s conceptualization, swing states refer to those about 30 politically, economically and demographically major states that will have a disproportionate impact on the future of democracy in their regions. These swing states are among others Brazil, Colombia, China, India, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, South Africa, Thailand, Turkey and Ukraine. It is argued that the patterns of democratization in these swing states will have regional and global impact on the status of global democracy. This paper includes an overall analysis on level of democratization in these swing states, followed by an in-depth analysis of illustrative strategic swing states in different geographical regions.

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