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  • 1.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    A Valid Matter for Managerial Foresight2012In: Journal of Futures Studies, ISSN 1027-6084, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 59-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively assess the validity of the managerial foresight concept. Social, environmental and technological aspects of past developments of a company, as well as self reported managerial behavior are interpreted and analyzed in terms of foresight and in terms of eight sub-components of the managerial foresight concept. The results of the study reveal that developments of the company and the managers’ behavior may be interpreted in terms of their foresight. It appears that individuals rather than structured procedures have been the ones who decide and define technology and operations. Evidence is provided for the construct validity of a definition of managerial foresight and for the potential significance of specific individuals’ foresight. Qualitative empirical evidence is added to theexistent pool of quantitative evidence for the construct validity of the managerial foresightconcept. The potential importance of foresight at the level of individual managers’ is illustrated.

  • 2.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Managerial foresight and firm performance2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – To specify what defines managerial foresight and to assess the association between managerial foresight and firm performance

    Methodology/Approach – First, previous research was reviewed and foresight was defined. Second, an instrument for measuring managerial foresight was developed. Third, an empirical case served as an illustration and as anassessment of validity. Fourth, managerial foresight was tested for association with firm performance.

    Findings – Foresight was specified as behavior with eight sub-components. A moderate and statistically significant positive relationship between managers’ foresight and firm performance was found.

    Research implications – The empirical evidence for the importance of managerial foresight provides a strong rationale for further studies. In distinguishing eight sub-components of foresight, and developing a managerial foresight measurement instrument, the dissertation makes relating foresight to various research fields possible, both on individual managerial andorganizational levels.

    Practical implications – Managers may consider whether foresight is important to them or to their organization. Managers, practical foresight tools, foresight programs et cetera, may now be assessed and compared in terms of foresight.

    Originality/Value – The dissertation provides empirical evidence of the importance of managerial foresight to firm performance. It conceives and advances foresight as a distinct construct. In developing and estimating aninstrument for measuring managerial foresight, the dissertation advancesforesight into a quantitatively measurable concept.

  • 3.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. Marknadsföring.
    Managerial foresight: concept and measurement2008In: Foresight, ISSN 1463-6689, E-ISSN 1465-9832, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 53-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to establish what foresight is, to review past usages and

    definitions of foresight and to synthesize them into one generic definition, in order to make the concept

    measurable.

    Design/methodology/approach – A discussion on how to classify variables in the social sciences

    serves as the starting-point. Next, a review of past definitions and usages of the concept foresight is

    followed by further analysis and then synthesizing of the generic definition. The generic definition is

    finally compared and contrasted with the related concepts of forecasting, strategic analysis, and

    intuition.

    Findings – Foresight is defined as behavior along three dimensions: degree of analyzing present

    contingencies and degree of moving the analysis of present contingencies across time; degree of

    analyzing a desired future state or states a degree ahead in time with regard to contingencies under

    control; and degree of analyzing courses of action a degree ahead in time to arrive at the desired future

    state.

    Research limitations/implications – The article makes foresight quantitatively measurable, which in

    turn makes it possible to empirically measure the existence of foresight among managers and to test the

    relationship between foresight and organizational performance.

    Practical implications – Practical foresight tools and programs, etc. can now be assessed and

    compared by both practitioners and researchers.

    Originality/value – In identifying three fundamental behavioral dimensions of foresight, the article

    conceives and advances foresight as a distinct concept that can be related to several research areas,

    both on individual (e.g. managerial) and organizational levels.

  • 4.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Managerial foresight: measurement scale and estimation2011In: Foresight, ISSN 1463-6689, E-ISSN 1465-9832, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to develop and assess an instrument measuring managerial foresight.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper outlines the construction and estimation of the instrumentthrough a seven-step process. A total of 57 preliminary Likert items were developed based on an extantreview and synthesis of definitions of foresight. The items were assessed through interviews andpre-testing. A preliminary instrument was administered to a selection of managers. Exploratory andconfirmatory factor analyses were employed to assess sub-scales and model fit. The instrument wasevaluated in terms of reliability and validity.

    Findings – The study demonstrates a valid and reliable 12 Likert item scale for measuring managerialforesight.Research limitations/implications – Managerial foresight can now be assessed and tested forassociation with, for example, managerial or organizational performance variables.

    Practical implications – Managers can now be assessed and compared in terms of foresight.Originality/value – In developing and estimating an instrument for measuring managerial foresight, thepaper advances foresight into a quantitatively measurable concept.

  • 5.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Managers' foresight matters2011In: Foresight, ISSN 1463-6689, E-ISSN 1465-9832, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 64-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – To assess the relationship between the foresight of managers and firm performance.

    Design/methodology/approach – An evolutionary perspective is deployed to specify thepresumed relationship between managerial foresight and firm performance measures. Apositive relationship between managerial foresight and firm performance is proposed. Thehypothesis is tested through Spearman’s rho, on Swedish managers, and firms in the computerprogramming industry. Managers’ foresight as well as performance is assessed as indexes.

    Findings – A moderate and statistically significant positive relationship between managers’foresight and firm performance.

    Theoretical implications – There is support for the theoretical relationship betweenmanagerial foresight and firm performance. There is a strong rationale for further studies.

    Originality/value – The paper provides empirical evidence regarding the importance ofmanagerial foresight for firm performance.

  • 6.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Subjective Performance, Managerial Foresight, and Objective Performance2014In: Strategic Change, ISSN 1086-1718, E-ISSN 1099-1697, Vol. 23, no 3-4, p. 133-146Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    The origin of foresight2012In: World Futures: Journal of General Evolution, ISSN 0260-4027, E-ISSN 1556-1844, Vol. 68, no 6, p. 390-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to develop a framework for the origin of foresight. Following a review of arguments for foresight as genetically inherited versus environmentally acquired, the understanding of foresight is expanded through a behaviorist perspective and through an evolutionary perspective. The framework established makes it possible to deploy evolutionary logic to explain foresight as well as to enhance our understanding of foresight, both on individual (e.g., managerial) and aggregated (e.g., organizational) levels.

  • 8.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    The Validity of Divergent Grounded Theory Method2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 13, p. 71-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to assess whether divergence of grounded theory method may be considered valid. A review of literature provides a basis for understanding and evaluating grounded theory. The principles and nature of grounded theory are synthesized along with theoretical and practical implications. It is deduced that for a theory to be truly grounded in empirical data, the method resulting in the theory should be the equivalent of pure induction. Therefore, detailed, specified, stepwise a priori procedures may be seen as unbidden or arbitrary. It is concluded that divergent grounded theory can be considered valid. The author argues that securing methodological transparency through the description of the actual principles and procedures employed, as well as tailoring them to the particular circumstances, is more important than adhering to predetermined stepwise procedures. A theoretical foundation is provided from which diverse theoretical developments and methodological procedures may be developed, judged, and refined based on their own merits.

  • 9.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Al-Shaaban, Sarah
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Wallin, Emmy
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Sjöqvist, Sarah
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Colors in Marketing: A Study of Color Associations and Context (in) Dependence2015In: International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, ISSN 2308-3816, E-ISSN 2222-6990, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mirroring an increasing awareness of the importance of colors, today marketing managers are paying increasing attention to the deployment of color in marketing as well as to the applicability of universal color associations. Two colors considered to carry several specific universal associations are blue and black. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to assess the contextual independence/dependence of consumers’ associations with the colors blue and black. Associative learning theory was deployed to specify the hypotheses. The hypotheses were tested through a paired sample t-test. The results show that the universal associations with the colors are different from the associations with the colors when they are displayed in a specific context. The implications for further research and limitations of the study are presented. Managers may want to consider the associations colors have in the specific context rather than relying on universal associations of colors.

  • 10.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Andersson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Henriksson, Dan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Johnson, Emma
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    The Sound of Choice2016In: International Journal of Business and Social Science, ISSN 2219-1933, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to testthe effect of suggestive music on consumer choice in cafés. It is proposed that suggestive music influences consumer choice in cafés. The hypotheses were tested through Chi-square on a totalof 283 measures. The results show that suggestive music has an effect on consumer choice in cafés. Managers who want to influence consumer choice in cafés through suggestive music may be able to do so. The results provide empirical support for the idea that suggestive music and the associations it carries represent information that consumers use for assessing choices and making selections.

  • 11.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    de Vries, Simon
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Hwang, Vidar
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Scent in Mail: The Effect of Scented Direct Mailings2015In: Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, ISSN 2220-6140, E-ISSN 2220-6140, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 24-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study is to test the effect of scent on response time and sales in direct mailings. It is proposed that congruent scent influences response time and sales in direct mailings. A total of 1571 direct mailings were sent out.The hypotheses were tested through a Mann-Whitney U test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The results show that scent influences response time to direct mailings but that it does not influence sales.Future research should perform exploratory studies to test the effect of scent with regard to various forms of direct marketing and offerings as well as in general product and service contexts. Managers may want to consider scenting direct mailings when a fast response is critical. The result provides empirical support for the idea that scent has an effect on response time in direct mailings.

  • 12.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Liljegren, Felicia
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Markovic, Sandra
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Månsson, Malin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Chocolate or Succulent Chocolate: the impact of sensory descriptions on choice2016In: International Journal of Business and Social Science, ISSN 2219-1933, E-ISSN 2219-6021, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to test the impact of sensory descriptions on customer propensity to select among appetizers, main courses and desserts in restaurants. It is proposed that sensory descriptions lead to decreased customer propensity to select an appetizer, unchanged customer propensity to select a main dish, and increased customer propensity to select a dessert. A field experimental design was used to test the hypotheses on menus through Chi-square on a total of 1367 measures. The results show, in line with the hypotheses, that sensory descriptions have a statistically significant negative impact on propensity to select an appetizer; virtually no impact on the propensity to select a main course; and a positive but not statistically significant impact on the propensity to select a dessert. The results problematize the notion that sensory descriptions make customers choose a specific dish from a restaurant’s menu. The results are limited to the field setting in that original menus were used as controls. Managers may want to be cautious when deploying sensory descriptions on appetizers and more generous when deploying them on desserts.

  • 13.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Lindgren, Victor
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Management Accounting and Logistics.
    Think Outside the Package: Context Congruence and Product Placement on Packaging2015In: International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, ISSN 2308-3816, E-ISSN 2222-6990, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 72-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of context congruence on attitudes towards product placement on packaging. It is proposed that congruence-/-incongruence between the context (packaging) and the (product featured as a) product placement has an effect on the attitude towards the (product featured as a) product placement. The hypotheses were tested through Man-Witney U tests on a total of 238 respondents. The results show that a congruent context and an incongruent context impact attitudes towards a product placement differently. A congruent context does not influence attitudes towards a product placement, while an incongruent context influences attitudes towards a product placement negatively. Managers may want to consider using a congruent product package context rather than an incongruent one when placing a product.

  • 14.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Olsson, Helena
    Paulsson, Rickard
    The Scent of a Successful Venue: (In) Congruent Scent and Consumer Attitude towards a Café2015In: International Journal of Business and Social Science, ISSN 2219-1933, E-ISSN 2219-6021, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 232-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to test the effect of (in) congruent added scents on consumer attitude towards a café facility. It is proposed that adding a congruent scent in a café has a positive effect on consumers’ attitudes towards the café and that adding an incongruent scent has a negative effect on consumers’ attitudes towards the café. The hypotheses were tested through t-test for independent sampleson 209respondents. The results show that adding an (in)congruent scent in a cafédoes not have a statistically significant impact on attitudes towards the café – with the exception of a statistically significant positive effect of congruent scent on attitudes among women towards the café. Managers may want to consider deploying congruent scent specifically with women in mind.

  • 15.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    von Koch, Christopher
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    En kvartetts arv av kvalitet och framtida rangordning2009In: Från barkbröd till ciabatta: En generationsväxlingsbok tillägnad: Lars-Göran Aidemark, Göran Andersson, Torbjörn Bredenlöw, Tomas Prenkert / [ed] Karin Jonnergård och Rolf G Larsson, Göteborg: Intellecta Infolog, Växjö University Press, , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Sarpong, David
    et al.
    University of the West of England, UK.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph
    University of Bristol, UK.
    Cultivation and management of strategic foresight in contexts of rapid change, greater complexity, and genuine uncertainties2015In: Foresight, ISSN 1463-6689, E-ISSN 1465-9832, Vol. 17, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Zineldin, Mosad
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Amsteus, Martin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Negativity hurts your style?: A study of leaders' negative emotions and their leadership style2014In: International Journal of Work Organisation and Emotion, ISSN 1740-8938, E-ISSN 1740-8946, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 327-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between leaders' negative emotions and leadership styles. Faculty members at a Swedish university between 1995 and 2007 were surveyed. Members who had worked at the same institution the entire period provided a total of 48 assessments regarding the styles and emotions of their leaders (deans). The results show that some negative emotions and leadership styles are related. For an organisation to perform well (e.g., in terms of work environment), leaders should consider managing their emotions.

  • 18.
    Zineldin, Mosad
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Ho, SamuelHong Kong Buddhist College.Amsteus, MartinLinnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    ISO, TQM, Medical Toursim & Patient Safety Best Practice2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International Standards Organisation (ISO) series sets out the methods that can be implemented in an organization to assure that the customers’ requirements are fully met. Moreover, the organization’s requirements will be met both internally and externally and at an optimum cost.  This is the result of efficient organization of the resources available, including material, people and technology.  The most important standard in the ISO Series is obviously ISO 9000.  Over the past fourteen ICIT’s the focuses were on ISO 9000.  However, with the advancement of mankind, there is a pressing need for other equally important standards for organizations to develop and compete.

    Because of the significance of the ISO Series of standards, and its close relationship to TQM, the Ufirst objective of this proceedings is to consider the impact of ISO implementation on TQM.  

     TQM and TRM provide the overall concept that fosters continuous improvement in an organization.  They stress a systematic, integrated, consistent, organization-wide perspective involving everyone and everything.  It focuses primarily on total satisfaction for both the internal and external customers within a management environment that seeks continuous improvement of all systems and processes.  TQM has been considered by many organizations as the way to survive and succeed.  The Usecond objective of this proceedigns  is therefore to provide a forum for the identification of the contemporary development in the theories and practices of TQM´and TRM.

     In view of the importance of Cooperation & Competition as developed by Prof. Mosad Zineldin (2000), the third objective of this porceddings is to research on the Cooperation & Competition approach to healthcare quality/safety and patient satisfaction as well as medical tourism.

     

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